Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center

 

Green Creek Township,
Sandusky County, Ohio

 

LG - 8

 


Introduction

Agency History

Scope and Content

Inventory

Abstracts

Introduction

The materials that make up this incomplete collection of Green Creek Township records of Sandusky County, Ohio, were donated to the Hayes Presidential Center over a period of years.

Agency History

Green Creek Township of Sandusky County, Ohio, is bounded on the north by Riley Township, on the east by York Township, on the west by Ballville Township, and on the south by Seneca County. The township’s first settler was Samuel Baker, Sr., who emigrated from New York in 1818. Other early settlers included Samuel Pogue, Jesse Benton, Lyman F. Miller, Silas Dewey, Giles Thompson, and Amos Fenn. Green Creek Township was organized in April 1822. Residents assembled at the home of Samuel Baker to hold their first election. Josiah Rumery, Samuel Pogue, and Samuel Baker were elected the township’s first trustees.

The adoption of the Ordinance of 1787 by the federal government provided for the legal establishment of the first governmental unit in Ohio, the township. When Ohio became a state in 1803, the township became a political subdivision of state government. Its powers were granted by the state legislature and its functions were directed by the state of Ohio. In 1804, provisions were made for the care of the poor, maintenance of roads, and the general peace of the township, the registration of livestock marks and brands, and generally to meet the basic needs of township residents.

Elected officials, a board of three trustees, a clerk, two overseers of the poor, a selected number of highway supervisors and constables, and a justice of the peace carried out these duties. In later years, boards of education and health, an assessor, and a treasurer were added.

Many of the functions of nineteenth-century township officials were assumed by county and municipal governments. Currently the number of elected officials has been reduced to three trustees and a clerk. They are elected to four-year terms and fulfill their duties on a part-time basis. Their responsibilities include the care and maintenance of cemeteries and roads, providing for sanitary waste disposal, rural zoning, and police and fire protection.

Ohio’s poor laws - including the indenture and apprenticeship of children under the age of 18, binding out of orphans and destitute children, the settlement of children, and the contracting out of care of the poor to the lowest bidder - were modeled after those of eastern states. In turn, states formed from the Northwest Territory based their poor laws on those of Ohio. In 1850, Ohio passed statutes directing orphans be removed from almshouses and to institutions specifically dedicated to their care.

The Board of Education was established in the early 1850's. Each board was responsible for its township’s educational functions, including the creation of school districts, construction and maintenance of school buildings, procurement of supplies, employment of teachers, selection of curriculum, collection of assessments for educational support, and distribution of funds for educational purposes. In 1914, the state legislature eliminated the township Board of Education system and reorganized rural school districts into a single system that was supervised by the County Board of Education.

Scope and Content

The collection of Green Creek Township records consists of five ledgers, loose papers, and a township Board of Education check book. The records date from 1820 to 1896. While the records are incomplete, they provide information about the township’s organization and development and its early residents during the settlement period when few other records were created. Perhaps most important are the ledgers containing minutes of township trustee meetings. The minutes are complete from the formation of the township through 1877. Additionally, the ledgers contain records dealing with nearly every important function of the township trustees during this period.

A single ledger is devoted to the Civil War service of township residents for the final year of the conflict. The township assessor listed each man’s name, his regiment, and the number of children under his care. This volume also contains a list of township residents who volunteered for Civil War service. According to notes in the ledger, the list was copied from records kept at Columbus, Ohio.

Agreements involving indentured servants and apprenticeships were recorded in a single volume. The ledger contains a continuous record of all contracts for the indenture and apprenticeship of Green Creek Township minors from 1834 to 1876. Abstracts of these contracts appear in the description of this collection. The final pages of this volume contain a continuous record of township residents’ livestock brands and ear marks from 1822 to 1886. In conjunction with these records are some estray notices.

The loose papers primarily consist of road tax duplicates for the years 1836 and 1839. They provide the names of all township property owners, descriptions of their land, acreage, and tax assessed. A single page lists the names of school-age children and their parents or guardians for School District #2 for the year 1840.

Inventory

Ac. 1796, 1939, 4299, 4476

1. Green Creek Township Trustees’ Records: 1820 to 1833, 1833 to 1860, 1860 to 1877 (The records
    contain meeting minutes, lists of electors and jurors, bonds, treasurer’s payments for labor performed,
    organization of school districts, payment for care of paupers, road orders, ditch and road petitions, and
    other township business.

2. Green Creek Township record of Civil War bounty payments, March 1864 to March 1865. (This record
    book also contains the township assessor’s list of residents enrolled as soldiers, giving each soldier’s
    regiment, company, and the number of children in his family. A list of Green Creek Township residents
    appearing on the roll at Columbus, Ohio, and credited to the township as volunteering for service is also
    included.

3. Loose papers:

    Green Creek Township Road Tax Duplicate, 1836, 1839.

    Green Creek Township Enumeration of School Age Children for School District #2, 1840.
        (This record lists the name of each parent or guardian, names of school age children under their care,
        and the sex of each.)

4. Green Creek Township Clerk’s Check Book and Check Stubs for the Office of Board of Education for
    Tuition Fund, 1892 through 1896.

5. Green Creek Township Record of Indentures of Apprentices and Servants "Book A," 1834 to 1876.
    (This record book also contains a record of estray notices and township residents’ marks and brands for
     livestock, 1822 to 1886.)

Abstracts of Record of Indentures of Apprentices and Servants "Book A"

Page 1: On December 4, 1834, George NETCHER, aged 18 years on November 19, 1834, was indentured to William McPHERSON by consent of his mother, Fanny QUACKENBUSH, to learn the art of black smithing. His term of indenture was to last until he was 21 years of age. McPherson agreed to provide board, clothing, washing, lodging, four months schooling, a new Bible, and new suit of clothes at the expiration of his service. Witnesses: John J. QUACKENBUSH and Wesley ANDERSON.

Page 3: On March 22, 1838, John Clemons FAILING, a "certain destitute boy," aged 7 years on August 16, 1837, was indentured to Lyman F. MILLER for 13 years, 4 months, and 27 days. Conditions: Miller was to provide board, clothing, washing, lodging, and sufficient schooling so as to be able to read, write, and do arithmetic to the single rule of "3." At the expiration of his service, John was to receive a new Bible, two suits of common wearing apparel, one pair of oxen between three and six years old, and one cow.

Page 5: On March 12, 1840, James ALEXANDER, aged 6 years on June [?], 1840, was bound out to John O. FORBES until June [?], 1855, to learn the occupation of farmer. Conditions: Forbes was to provide meat, lodging, clothing, medicine, and sufficient schooling so as to be able to read, write and do arithmetic to the single rule of "3." James was to receive a new Bible, two suits of wearing apparel, and $20 at the expiration of his service.

Page 7: On April 24, 1839, Chaney BUEL, aged 5 years and 11 days, was bound out to James GUINALL, of this [Green Creek] township by his father, Elijah BUEL, also of Green Creek Township. His term was to last until the age of 21 years, during which time he was to learn the occupation of husbandry. Conditions: Guinall was to provide meat, lodging, washing, and wearing apparel. Witnesses: Henry MOE, John WASSON.

Page 9: On April 20, 1841, George ABBEY, "destitute orphan boy of Green Creek Township," aged 10 years on January 18, 1841, was indentured to Lemuel BAKER to learn the occupation of common servant and common farmer. His term was to last until January 18, 1852. Baker was to provide meat, lodging, medicine, washing, clothing, and schooling so as to be able to read, write, and do arithmetic to the single rule of "3." At the expiration of his service, George was to receive a new Bible and two suits of common wearing apparel.

Page 11: [no date] David ABBEY, who was seven years old on April 17, 1841, was indentured to John PHINNEY [also spelled FINNEY] of York Township until April 17, 1855, to learn the occupation of common servant. Conditions: Phinney was to provide meat, lodging, washing, clothing, medicine, and schooling so as to be able to read, write, and do arithmetic to the single rule of "3." At the expiration of his service, David was to receive a new Bible and two suits of common wearing apparel.

Page 13: [no date] Mariah PEMBLETON, aged 5 on February 10, 1841, was bound out as a common servant to W. W. and Hannah CULVER until the age of 18 years. Conditions: The Culvers were to provide comfortable and suitable clothing and schooling so as to be able to read, write, and do arithmetic to the single rule of "4." At the expiration of her service, Mariah was to receive a new Bible and two suits of common wearing apparel. [Additional note by Amos FENN, Township Clerk, "Mariah is the child of Betsey PEMBLETON of said township, who will not provide for said child."]

Page 15: On October 5, 1841, Milton STONE, aged 18 on August 8, 1841, was apprenticed to Elisha and David E. ALVORD to learn the wagon and carriage-making trade, with the consent of his father, Christopher STONE. His term was to last until August 8, 1844. Conditions: The Alvords were to provide meat, lodging, medicine, washing, clothing, $50 the first year, $75 the second, and $100 the third year. Witness: James R. BARNES.

Page 16: On July 19, 1841, Amelia Elizabeth WILSON, a "destitute orphan," aged 7 years on September 27, 1841 was indentured to Samuel NICHOLS as a common servant until September 27, 1850. Conditions: Nichols was to provide meat, lodging, medicine, washing, clothing, and schooling so as to be able to read, write and do arithmetic to the first four rules. At the expiration of her service, Amelia was to receive a new Bible and two suits of common wearing apparel.

Page 19: On January 6, 1842, John SHILTS, aged 16 on March 24, 1842, was indentured to Joseph VOLLMER until November 1, 1845, to learn the trade and occupation of tailor. Consent was given by his mother, Leah SHILTS. Vollmer was to provide meat, lodging, medicine, washing, clothing, and nine months of schooling. John was to receive a new suit of clothing at the expiration of his service.

Page 21: On June 20, 1842, an article of agreement was signed between Lemuel BAKER, York Township, and John P. BUTLER, Green Creek Township. Baker agreed to release and sign over his right, title, and claim to George ABBEY to Butler for the rest of George’s term.

Page 22: On April 22, 1843, Frederick STIGALL, "destitute orphan," aged 6 years on April 1, 1843, was bound out to Elisha DAWLEY to learn the occupation of common farmer until April 1, 1858. Dawley agreed to provide meat, lodging, washing, clothing, and schooling sufficient to be able to read, write, and do arithmetic to the single rule of "3." At the end of his service, Frederick was to receive a new Bible and two suits of wearing apparel.

Page 24: On April 1, 1843, Sarah Ann STEPHENSON, aged 14 on November 28, 1842, was bound out to Stephen T. FITCH to learn the art of housework. Consent was given by her guardian, Samuel EBER. Her term was to expire November 28, 1846. Finch was to provide meat, lodging, medicine, washing, clothing, and schooling including knowledge of arithmetic to the single rule of "3." At the end of her service, Sarah Ann was to receive a new Bible, two suits of wearing apparel, one bed, one bedstead, and bedding.

Page 26: On April 28, 1843, William PEMBLETON, aged 6 years on July 26, 1843, was bound out as a common laborer and farmer until the age of 21, to Ransom JONES. Jones agreed to provide suitable, comfortable wearing apparel and sufficient schooling. At the expiration of his service, William was to receive a new Bible and two good suits.

Page 28: On August 2, 1843, Richard M. C. JOHNSON, "destitute orphan," aged 2 years, 6 months, 22 days, was apprenticed to George JONES to learn the occupation of farmer. Jones was to provide meat, lodging, medicine, washing, clothing, and schooling. At the expiration of his service, Richard was to receive a new Bible and two suits of common wearing apparel.

Page 31: On September 30, 1847, Abigail HAYDEN, aged 7 years on August 22, 1847, was apprenticed to William W. GREEN to learn the occupation of housekeeping, with the consent of her father, William W. HAYDEN. The term was to last until August 22, 1858. Conditions: Green was to provide meat, lodging, clothing, washing, and schooling sufficient to read, write, and do arithmetic to the first rule of "4." Abigail was to receive a new Bible and two suits of common wearing apparel at the expiration of her service.

Page 33: On May 13, 1850, William HERALD, aged 18 years, was apprenticed to Miles W. PLAINE to learn the occupation of harness and saddle making. His term was to begin June 1, 1850, and continue for four years. Consent was given by James and William HERALD. Plaine was to pay William $25 after the first year, $30 after the second, $35 after the third, and $75 after the fourth year.

Page 35: On January 14, 1852, Sarah Elouisa FRANCIS, aged 2 years on November 23, 1851, was apprenticed to Thomas GRANGER until November 23, 1868, to learn the art of housework, with the consent of her mother, Charlotte FRANCIS. Conditions: Granger was to provide meat, lodging, washing, clothing, and schooling. Sarah was to receive a new Bible and two suits of common wearing apparel at the expiration of her service. Witnesses: Wm. H. REYNOLDS and Wm. BOYD.

Page 37: On November 11, 1852, William STEVENSON, aged 15 years and 3 months, was apprenticed to Miles W. PLAINE to learn the occupation of harness and saddle making. His service was to begin November 12, 1852, and continue for 4 years and 6 months. Consent was given by Nancy STEVENSON. Conditions: Plaine was to pay $25 after the first year, $30 after the second, $35 after the third and fourth years, and $70 after the last six months.

Page 39: On June 30, 1857, Clarissa MARSHAL, a "destitute orphan" aged 7 years, was apprenticed to Charles RAMSEY until age 18. Consent was given by the Sandusky County Infirmary Directors: P. BEAUGRAND, Joseph BIRDSEYE. Conditions: Ramsey was to provide meat, lodging, medicine, clothing, washing, and schooling sufficient to read, write, and do arithmetic to the single rule of "3." Clarissa was to receive a new suit of common wearing apparel at the expiration of her service.

Page 41: On January 15, 1859, Mary PARKER, born October 28, 1858, was bound out to George PORTER until October 28, 1876, to learn the occupation of seamstress and housework. Consent was given by her father, Ephraim PARKER. Conditions: Porter was to provide meat, lodging, medicine, clothing, washing, and schooling sufficient to read, write and do arithmetic to the single rule of "3." Mary was to receive a new Bible and two suits of common wearing apparel at the expiration of her service.

Page 43: On October 3, 1859, Charles Albion CLOUGH, aged 6 months on April 3, 1859, was bound out to Elaner [Elanor] CLOUGH as a servant until April 3, 1880. Consent was given by P. BEAUGRAND and J. BIRDSEYE, Directors of the Sandusky County Infirmary. Elaner CLOUGH was to provide meat, lodging, medicine, clothing, washing, and schooling sufficient to read, write, and do arithmetic to the single rule of "3." Charles was to receive a new Bible and two suits of common wearing apparel at the expiration of his service.

Page 45: On February 9, 1861, Mary BEACH, aged 4 weeks on February 12, 1861, was apprenticed to Martin RATHBUN as a servant until age 18. Consent was given by Peter BOGRAND, Saxton S. RATHBUN, and James PARK, Sandusky County Infirmary Directors. Conditions: Rathbun was to provide meat, lodging, medicine, clothing, washing, and schooling sufficient to read, write, and do arithmetic to the single rule of "3." Mary was to receive a new Bible and two suits of common wearing apparel at the expiration of service.

Page 46: On July 4, 1866, at Clyde, Ohio, Willis R. FORESTER, aged 4 years on December 19, 1865, was apprenticed to Jesse RHODES until age 21 [December 19, 1882] to learn a trade of his choice, "be treated as a member of the family and to have a complete, thorough education in the common sciences," and to learn to read, write, and do arithmetic. Consent was given by his father, John B. FORESTER.

Page 49: On March 3, 1873, Clara HOGLE, a "destitute girl", aged 11, was bound out to George W. Harding of Green Creek Twp., until the age of 18 [November 1,1879], to learn the art of housekeeper. Conditions: Harding was to provide meat, lodging, medicine, clothing, washing, and schooling sufficient to read, write, and do arithmetic to the single rule of "3". Clara was to receive a Bible and a suit of wearing apparel at the expiration of her service. Consent was given by the Directors of the Erie County Infirmary: George DIMON, D. D. WEST, H. P. STAR. Witnesses were A. W. and Fred FISHER.

Page 52 & Page 54: On June 10, 1875, Franklin TEE, aged 12 on July 30, 1875, was apprenticed to John D. KEYSER until the age of 18. On the same date, James TEE, aged 8 in September 1874, was apprenticed to West KINNEY until the age of 18. Both were to learn the art of farming. Consent was given by their father, William R. TEE. Conditions: Keyser and Kinney were each to provide meat, lodging, medicine, clothing, washing, and schooling sufficient to read, write, and do arithmetic to the single rule of "3". At the expiration of their services, Franklin was to receive $50 and a new suit of clothes and James was to receive one good suit and $100.

Page 56: On October 15, 1875, Grace E. RATHBUN, aged 6 years, was bound out to Martin RATHBUN until October 15,1887, to learn the art of general housekeeping. Conditions: Rathbun was to provide meat, lodging, medicine, clothing, washing, and schooling sufficient to read, write, and do arithmetic to the single rule of "1". Grace was to receive a suit of good clothing at the expiration of her service.

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