Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center

 

 

Dr. Francis (Franz) Hermann

 

LH-362

Introduction

Biographical Sketch

Scope and Content

Inventory

 

Introduction

 

The Dr. Francis Hermann collection was donated to the Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Center in 2009. Hermann also wrote his name Herrmann, and Herrman, The ledgers were microfilmed by the Center for Archival Collections, Jerome Library, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio.

 

Biographical Sketch

 

Dr. Francis Hermann was born August 23, 1821 in Kaiserslautern, Germany. According to family tradition Dr. Hermann escaped to the United States in 1850 with three friends, who are believed to have participated with him in a student revolt. Hermann married Christina Hemley September 15. 1855. She was daughter of John Hemley of Putnam County, Ohio. They were the parents of at least five known children: Francis, Amelia, Armin, Minnie, and Ottilie.  It is unknown where Hermann gained his medical education, but by 1857, he had established a flourishing practice in New Riegel, Seneca County, Ohio. In 1866, Dr. Hermann and his family moved to Bluffton, Allen County, Ohio, where he continued to practice medicine. He died May 24, 1882.  Christina Hermann never remarried. She lived with her daughter Minnie Hermann and granddaughter Lillian Riehling in Bluffton, Ohio. Christina died December 1, 1906. Dr. Hermann and his widow Christina are buried with her parents in Pandora, Putnam County, Ohio. 

 

Scope and Content

 

The collection contains four ledgers, each inscribed with the opening date and the village and county where Dr. Francis Hermann practiced medicine.  Ledger “A” provides an accounting of each of his patients, giving the dates of visits, amounts charged and the payments received from 1857 to about 1863.  In addition to cash, Hermann accepted payment in the form of hay, corn, pork, oats, veal, and labor including washing, cutting wood, and mowing.  An index appears in the front along with a genealogy of the Hemley/Hermann family.

 

Daybooks “A,” “B,” and “C” are a record of daily calls on patients by Hermann. He lists the name of the household and patient, date, treatment, and fee. Dr. Hermann delivered babies, set fractures, opened inflamed wounds, treated head injuries, and vaccinated children.  Hermann noted the birth of each child he delivered, writing  geburt” in the margin, the German word for “born.” He also recorded the father’s name and the sex of the newborn. At the end of each daybook, he listed the total number of “confinements” which seems to indicate the number of deliveries he attended in the span of time covered by each daybook. Dates in “Daybook C” indicate that Hermann appears to have closed his practice in New Riegel on April 27, 1866. On page 99 of “Daybook C,” Dr. Hermann wrote “Bluffton, Allen Co., Ohio, May 4, 1866.” From that date forward, the ledger’s pages are listed “Bluffton, Ohio.”

 

Predigten uber die Evangelien des Kirchenjabres by Georg Cronenwett (1889) was transferred to the library’s general collection

 

Inventory

 

Ac. 5755

Four ledgers

 

  1. Ledger “A,” dated April 25, 1857 – November 1860, New Riegel, Seneca County, Ohio, 259 pages
  2. Daybook “A,” dated April 25, 1857 – November 1859, New Riegel, Seneca County, Ohio, 239 pages
  3. Daybook “B,” dated May 1859 – December 1860, New Riegel, Seneca County, Ohio, 148 pages
  4. Daybook “C,” dated January 1, 1861, New Riegel, Seneca County Ohio – July 21, 1867, Bluffton, Allen County, Ohio, 260 pages.