Correspondence of Rutherford Hayes Platt, 1871-1886

 

[Rutherford to Wm. A. Platt]

                                                                                                                        New Haven Conn.
                                                                                                                        May 6th 1871

Dear Father

    I reached here yesterday noon several hours late but otherwise all right.
    The train reached New York nearly on time, about 9 oclock Thursday eve. and I took the 11 oclock boat for New Haven which was due here at 4 oclock in the morning but on account of a storm on the sound it had to anchor after going a short distance from N. Y. and wait for morning and the wind and tide being against us then. We did not reach here until 12 oclock.
    I saw my tutor right after dinner and began my duties with the afternoon recitation. My excuse for absence was of course sufficient.
    The rain was unceasing all the way here and poured down in torrents just as the boat reached here. It was such a cold rain that I missed my overcoat a little but still am not sorry that I left it at home. Rao has been here twice since the beginning of the term as I find from notes he has left in my room.
    I want to get this into the morning mail it possible and so must close.
    I trust you are getting along as well as when I left home.
    With love to all at home

                                From your aff. son
                                                    Ruddy

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[Rutherford to Wm. A. Platt]

                                                                                                                                    Washington D. C.
                                                                                                                                     28th April 1878

My dear Father,
    Instead of returning direct to New York, I have come this far-about way to spend a quiet Sunday here at the White House and will go up to the city tonight. The trip has been a very enjoyable one throughout, but I am going to skip over that now to say something concerning another matter which I trust you will not be sorry to hear about.
    You know that when Minnie & I were in Paris, we had friends there Mrs. & Miss Luthill with whom our relations were particularly pleasant and of whom we thought a great deal, and to come to the point by the shortest cut I have kept up a correspondence with Miss Luthill since our return home, am now engaged to marry her, & want to tell you and Laura and Fannie and Minnie about it; but we both think it should not become an open secret just yet. Of course next year I must continue at the Law School but after that I hope we may fix some time for our marriage with your full approval and when that can be done it shall no longer be a secret. I wish I could write so fully & well that you might know Miss Anna Luthill from my letter as she really is. But after all a letter can give only a vague, general outline and the finer details of character one’s own acquaintance & observation alone can fill in. She is bright and accomplished and one year younger than myself. I am sure you will learn to love her when you know her, and there’s but one thing in which she is not equal to any daughter in law which you may picture as the desirable one & that is she’s rather delicate - never an invalid, but still not robust.
    Mr. Luthill, Anna’s father, was editor at one time of the N. Y. Times, afterward he removed to San Francisco. In the latter part of his life he went abroad with his wife & daughter in search of a climate that might restore him to health, but shortly after their return to this country and before they had reestablished themselves in a home he died and then Mrs. Luthill and Anna returned to Europe and have lived there almost ever since, only coming back to see their friends here at intervals for a few months at a time. It seems as though our family had suddenly taken the matrimonial fever - with Minnie’s engagement and Frank’s and now mine, but as you have h___ed Minnie’s, so I hope you will mine. It is rather hard to have to write about it, when it would be so much more satisfactory to both you & me to be able to talk it over - but it is better so than to wait, I think.
    One more thing I must tell you, it had almost escaped me for I never think of it as a matter of importance myself. She is lame. One of her limbs was paralyzed when she was a small child.
    Now, father, please read this all over again & then think it over, and then write me.

                                                        Affly-
                                                            Your Son
                                                                    Rutherford

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[Wm. A. Platt from Rutherford]

                                                                                                                             22 East 20th St.
                                                                                                                             N. Y. City March 3rd/ 79

My dear Father,
    Your favor of Feb. 28th with draft for $100 - came to had today. I thank you very much for so promptly remembering my wants and so fully forestalling them.
    Am sorry that you find it necessary to remain at home just now when the trying weather is coming on. I hope for better news of little Laura.
    Am very well & getting on satisfactorily.

                                                        Your loving son
                                                            Rutherford

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[Rud to Emily]

Dec. 11th, 1882

Dear Emily -
    I was not minded that Christmas was so near as well as your natal (?) day until seeing this morning certain preparations for a parcel to you ----- I will not try to send anything more than a Christmas greeting though I should like to drop something into Santa Claus’ sack for the darling children - I find that Henry Taylor is quite in the notion of going to Bermuda in the spring - I think we shall arrange it, & come down upon you then.
    With love to the Genl. the children & yourself & wishing you all a Merry Christmas & good appetite for your plum pudding & turkey.

                                                    Yours
                                                        Rud

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[Rud to Emily]

Jan 7th 1884

Dear Emily - Thank you very much for the pretty holiday remembrance, the wheat sheaf- The coffee pot you wish should have gone by the last steamer but supposing your N.Y. agents could find it there & save expressing it from here, I wrote them the name & description with direction to procure & ship to you. they were unable to find it however so now I have bought one here & it is on its way to N.Y. - not so large as Laura’s but the largest to be found.
    We have been enjoying a spell of real winter - the thermometer below zero by a large majority - with good sleighing. Evening entertainments numerous as usual at this time of year. I have been accepting invitations for almost every evening.
    The local matter of widest interest at present is the election of a U.S. Senator by our legislature assembled today - a democrat but all feel interested in knowing who he is to be. - I made calls on New Years day - going with Henry Taylor, Capt. Smith & U.S. Henderson. There were few out & not so many receiving as usual - It looked like the very last of a good old custom -
    With love to Russell & the dear children & yourself.

                                                                    Yours
                                                                        Rud

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[R(ud) to Emily]

Columbus, O. Monday, March 31/84

Dear Emily - For once you see I commence my letter before it is time for the last mail to your steamer to close - and as this may indicate I have a plan of importance to suggest for Russell & yourself to consider. I do not understand that you have bought the Burlington lot, or made any special arrangements for spending next summer there or any place else, and my suggestion is that you come home & take the old house for as many months as you will - Mother’s house is about finished - only mantles & gas fixtures to put in yet. She talks some of moving into it in May thought it seems to me better that she should wait until near the time of Susie’s return & I think it more likely that she will not move until early in July.
    The carpets & probably much of the furniture of the old house will be left, & I will see to it that all, furniture & house, are thoroughly cleaned, & necessary additions supplied. - I have two horses & an excellent man and a cook as well as nurse girl, if wanted, can be found for you without doubt.
    You could entertain & have visitors then as much as you liked - quite different from the little Albany house - and it seems to me that on many accounts the plan must strike you favorably. We shall be impatient for our next mail and until then will entertain strong hopes that you will decide to come directly to Columbus when you come up from Bermuda and to stay here until after thanksgiving day.
    You know the old house with its thick walls is cool even though we should have a hot summer.
    The children were of course disappointed at giving up their Bermuda trip - but yet took it very cheerfully. Jeanie & John have gone up to Fremont with Aunt L. for their week’s vacation.
    Our spring has opened - the usual garden work well under way - buds swelling - and our lawns all perfect.
    Ralph Smith & Katie Comstock are to be married in Trinity Church the evening of April 17th - I am to be one of their ushers since I gave up the Bermuda trip.
    If you are still without a cook & not expecting to get one, why not break up housekeeping in B. earlier than Aug. 1st & come home with the children leaving Russell to follow as soon as he gets his bulbs disposed of.
    I will send you about $1100 by next steamer. Bermuda onions are in our market & we have had them several times for dinner -

                                                                        Yours with love
                                                                                    R.

[on envelope]
    Aggie aint a very cook I must say.
    The envelope is very nice and I hope you will be able to come with us and not go to your homes all the time.
    I have plenty of books and no horses.

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[Rud to Emily]

Columbus, O. Tuesday, April 1, 1884

Dear Emily - Your telegram reached me yesterday afternoon, after I had mailed my letter to you - I should pack my bag & come right along if it were possible to arrange matters now - but it is not. If I had had it in view for the past two weeks I should have found some difficulty in shaping matters for an absence at this time - The steamer must have been late this week so no letter has come from you yet.
    I hope that when the ‘Orinoco’ comes back next time she will bring us the good news that you & Russell will be here next summer in the old home.
    You will read in your papers of the troubles in Cinti - We have been very much steamed up about it; One young man serving in a military company from here has been killed and several others from here more or less severely wounded.

                                                            Affly. Your Brother
                                                                      R.

[on envelope]
    Uncle Ruddy came here and I will show you my birthday cake and Aggie put some candles in it. We went down town and we went home to get some apples and I bumped my head right here
    And we we [sic] came home Mama was "feeding" the chickens and I am glad they was ______     And I’ve got a stomach ache and a headache and so goodbye. Come without any fear and do not cry but wipe your tears of course I send you my cotograph. I wash the dishes and help Mama all that I can with pealing one potato I cut my hand.

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[Rud to Emily]

Tuesday Apr. 29th 1884
    Columbus, O.                

Dear Emily - Your’s of 18th is at hand with receipt. Did you receive from me in Feb. last a draft for $371.06 - Am not sure that I ever heard from it.
    We are all much delighted that you & Russell fell in with our plan for having you here in the old house next summer & fall - and I have been telling the good news among your friends.
    Mother plans to move early in June. Perhaps I will secure a cook & keep bachelor’s hall until you come.
    Maggie Taylor has come home from the South. She does not seem to have altogether liked Florida, because it was not enough like Bermuda. The Failings are moved into their new house and have made a very tasteful and attractive home of it. - Ralph Smith & Katie Comstock had a big wedding at Trinity Church and are now returned form their wedding journey, & keep house on Park (?) St. just beyond the railroads. I had a glimpse of Bermuda lilies at the house reception but did not think of your having sent them - they were a little drooping.
    We have not had much use from our Spring clothes yet - but there is now a fair prospect of their being called for.
    With love to Russell & the children & yourself.

                                                                                Your’s
                                                                                    Rud.

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[Rud to Emily]

Columbus, O. May 13th/ 84

Dear Emily - Your letter of 7th is at hand - the fixing of the date of your arrival here gives a very delightful sense of the certainty of your coming - though I had hoped it would be two weeks earlier.
    You will want your house linen, or else buy or borrow here - also your spoons, forks, & knives .. I will make sure of a good cook, never fear.
    We will have a good lawn for tennis at the back of the house, among the fruit trees - the croquet lawn is not long enough & is too exposed.
    Laura & John Sr. went down to Cinti. last evening to be gone a couple of
days, leaving the children to keep house. - Your’s with love to all -
                                                                                    Rud

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[Rud to Emily]

Columbus O. June 10th /84

Dear Emily - We are all wishing for a letter from you - I have not written much myself of late & can not complain but I have in mind daily the thought of your being here next summer with the babes & all in the old homestead. Mother moves into her new house next week - the cleaning & furnishing there are now in progress - Laura is on the look out for a cook - I will engage one the first opportunity & keep house by myself till you come. Mrs. Dennison expressed a wish to rent our house for a year from next Dec., she has sold hers, but on looking it over thought it too large. It is possible she may want it yet -
    Of course the house is not generally for rent - but I think it would be well to have some one living in it. & would be glad to let the Dennisons have it.
    We are having fine June weather - picnics are in order. There is every reason to expect a delightful summer.

                With love to all
                            Your’s
                            Rud

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[Rud to Emily]

Columbus, O. June 24th /84

Dear Emily -
    Here’s good news just come, viz. that you will sail two weeks earlier. You could not write anything better than that. Mother moved into her house last week - She is not yet fully settled, and there are still pictures, books, & c. to move from the old house. The old house will be rather bare, but a thorough cleaning shall begin as soon as the moving is quite finished, and I think we will succeed in making it comfortable & attractive. Mrs. Dennison did not want the house in the fall - The first of Dec. would have suited her as well as any time - but she finally decided not to take a house for the next year. Their plans take them away from here, I think. I am sure of getting a good cook. Mrs. Daugherty has two or three of the very best on the string for me. We will have a good place for the tennis net behind the house. We are having some real summer weather now but rain frequently, and the old house is cool as always.

                                                                            Your’s with love
                                                                                        R.

P.S. Laura has brought down your letter to her.- I am laying in some household goods - so you need not bring so very much in that way. I shall have the necessary linen & c. for four beds - with two servants that will give me one spare bed - also table linen sufficient probably - but perhaps you had better bring a few napkins – and I have two doz. towels. You have better bring some more towels and some of your silver. I will get a doz. spoons, forks & c. plated ware.

                                                                              Your’s
                                                                                 Rud

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[R. to Emily]

Columbus, O. July 8th, 1884

Dear Emily -
    I am fairly started at housekeeping - just keeping the pot boiling until you come. My cook, I think, will do her part.
    I have invested to some extent in household goods, & the housecleaning will go bravely on under Laura’s supervision. She is really presiding genius over the two households, so that the burden of house-keeping does not weigh very heavily upon me.     I have at present no plans for going away this summer, but if an opportunity presented itself to spend a week-ten days at the sea shore with good company at the end of this month just before you come up, I should do it. Fanny packed off to Gambier yesterday, for the month.
    We never had a pleasanter summer than this, so far. The climate of Central Ohio seems to hold its own.

                                                        Your’s with love to all.
                                                                    R.

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[R. to Emily]

                                                                                Monday             Columbus, O.             July 21, 1884

Dear Emily,
    One last word of encouragement & admonition to you before you sail - of encouragement, viz. that a cohort of scrubbers, that it would have done your housewifely breast good to see, have done the work for carpets, floors, walls &c. and the old house is clean for your reception. Of admonition, that you change not your plans between thus & two weeks hence, and go not aside to Burlington or elsewhere, nor defer the time of your coming - My cook Bridget does her cooking just to a taste and I have three good meals every day. She is not over-spry & and it is well that you bring both Aggie and your house girl.     Our weather is perfect - yesterday thermometer 81,E today about the same. - A little rain just now would not come amiss, that is the only concession to be made.
    Susan came home yesterday with John - looking well & and every way improved by her school life.
    I expect to have a telegram from you from N. Y. announcing that you will be home Monday afternoon, two weeks from today. Train gets in at 3:30 - I will order dinner for five o’clock.

                                                                            Your’s with love to all
                                                                                            R.

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[Rud to Emily]

Columbus, O.   
June 21st 1885

Dear Emily -
    I have missed you & the General and the dear children some, but nevertheless am getting on very well, not being in the old house much except to sleep.
    Gov. Hoadly did not come out to look at the house, but decided to take the Ben Smith house, which was offered to him, in case he brought his family here.
    I take a one o’clock dinner at Fanny’s and then a six o’clock dinner at Laura’s - and very good dinners they are. There is daily talk of the Fullerton migration to Bermuda and it seems to be one of the things sure to happen.
    You have your way as usual, and a very good thing it will be for Fanny, I am sure. It is well you have fifty acres and a large piazza for the youngsters. They are active & can cover a good deal of space.
    Last Sunday I took dinner with the Taylors & we talked considerably about Bermuda & the Hastings. Their garden has produced a crop of 17 year locusts - the little holes in the ground through which they come up are all about - they swarm about in the trees, and keep up a tremendous racket.
    Dr. Greenleaf whom I saw a day or two ago wished to be remembered to you and the Genl -
    We have had frequent rains since you left, and a real down-pour today - washing the face of all out doors as clean as the surface of your bay & soaking down to the roots of all green things.
    Don’t forget the beauties of the old home, and the advantages of a Central Ohio climate.
    With love to Russell & yourself & kisses to the darling children.

                                                                        Your’s
                                                                            Rud.

22nd your letter of 17th at hand R.

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[R. to Emily]

July 1, 1885

Dear Emily - I have about $4500 belonging to the estate - not income but capital - & think the best & safest application of it I can make is to pay it on the note held by you and this is what I therefore wish to do with it. You would probably rather let the note stand as an investment - but some equally good investment can no doubt be found for it. - Let me hear from you by next steamer in regard to this, & if you would like to have me do so I will make inquiry for some good loan here & report what I find to you. Perhaps next Spring we might build further on our Case property - 4th st - and your money could go into that - and if you put in more than your share there could be an arrangement to secure it & allow you interest - that would probably be as safe & advantageous a disposition as you could make of it - & perhaps until then it could be loaned to the D. S. & L. Co. at 5 or 6% with one or more of the directors as surety. You might stipulate to loan at 5% if all the directors would sign the note.
    I may write again before the steamer goes but send this off while it is on my mind.

                                                                        Yours,
                                                                            R.

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[R. to Emily]

Columbus O.  
Oct. 27, 1885

Dear Emily - It is about time you had a line from me - not pretending to give news or entertainment but just to assure you that I am thinking of you all, & especially now when we look for the news from Bermuda with more than the usual interest, & hoping each time that it will tell more decidedly of Russell’s increasing strength & your relief and happiness. There are many inquiries for the last word about the General from his friends here.
    Do you remember the beautiful autumn days of last October when we had such drives into the country - It is just so now, but I don’t have so many drives. There are the horses - old Prince & Charley just the same - but they don’t get enough exercise - Every bright morning as I walk down town I think I will go out for a drive after lunch but it does not often happen so. I am growing quite accustomed to living alone in the old house. Am not there very much in the evening, but when I am, the bright library fire & lamp with my books & papers about in undisturbed disorder are very genial.
    The Jewetts seem to have given up coming to Columbus this year.
    There are the usual gayeties – wedding cards come for you every now & then but from people of last winter’s acquaintance & not especially interesting to you so I do not forward them. e.g. Mary Joyce and another is Harry S. Abbott - I send you a photo if I can get it done up in time for the mail.
    Your’s with love & for the dear children kisses.
                                                                        R.

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[Rutherford to Emily]

Jan. 2, 1886

Dear Emily - I did not send check to Am. Ex. Nat. Bank promptly on receipt of your request to do so — waiting to make up your account, which I might have done almost any day, but put off when other matters were on hand, thinking the money would only lie at the N.Y. Bank, & that the matter was not pressing. I did send check Dec. 9th for full balance $829.33 as shown by enclosed copy of account.
    Yesterday was a beautiful New Year’s day — but not much like mid-winter of the north – thermometer above 50E - there was very little calling - none in the old style of going the grand rounds - that custom is gone, & I think a few visits to one’s more intimate friends will become the regular thing, & much more satisfactory. I have constant inquiries for the General & yourself. Dr. Greenleaf sends kind remembrances. I hope you can soon give us better news of the General’s condition to report to his friends here than has come of late.
    Your’s with love and the heartiest of "Happy New Years" to all
                                        Rutherford

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[R. to Emily]

March 25,1886

Dear Emily - It has been one while since you have had a letter from me - perhaps longer. There are sometimes other things than bazaars to occupy my time but I believe the habit of not writing merely social or brotherly letters, (if that can be called a habit), which a man falls into, has more to do with my lapse --- I am intending to build on the back part of our property s.w.. cor. State & 4th strs - a building to cost $16000 to $18000 - Am satisfied that we can rent rooms there on terms that will make the investment a good one. Have the plans for such a building & hope to get contracts mad and cellar begun early in April. - As I want money for your share I will let you know or if you or any other prefer, I will furnish the funds & deduct from your share of the rents enough to pay 8% on any such advances -
    Am not likely to get away from home this spring - Thanks for you offer to send me flowers to N. Y. if I should be there - Don’t you think you may all come home for a while this summer - or some time soon. The old house is ready for you. The signs of Spring are all about, & and in another month you could come with the assurance of pleasant warm weather. Think of how happy it would make us all.
    We brag a great deal about your children & it is only just that you should bring them back to the old place from time to time.
    Mr. Gibson, who married Nannie Campbell & lived near Greenlawn, accidentally & fatally shot himself a week ago while cleaning a revolver. He was quite a sportsman, & expert with all fire arms.
    I hope that you get loads of news in your other letters and take it for granted that you do.
    Probably I am writing as wide (?) as possible from a steamer day, but no matter it goes into the post office and if it don’t reach you by the next steamer, whenever that is, just let me know & I’ll have a row about it with this democratic administration.
    With love & kisses to the dear children & all of you ----

                                                Your’s
                                                    R.

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[Rud to Emily]

April 27, 1886

Dear Emily    — Your Bazaar (?) arrived in due time - The distribution was so well managed that I secured for myself the bag of pine needles which pleases me very much. Probably Fanny will explain to you how particularly useful to her the cravat case, which fell to her lot, will be — at all events I made a square trade with her.
    Your letter to Laura yesterday seems to dash all hopes of your coming home this summer — and it is a disappointment to all of us. Another year is such a long time to wait.
    I have the new building on 4th st. commenced. You need not at present arrange for more than $4000 for your share. - I hope to have it competed early in the fall and ready for tenants.
    I can furnish money from the estate for your share if you wish — the interest to be paid out of your share of rents but the rate of interest should be 8%.
    Fanny does not seem to regain strength as fast as we could wish. The weather is beautiful & she is out probably every day –
    With love to the general & yourself and kisses to the dear children -

                                                Your’s
                                                    Rud.

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[Rud to Emily]

June 22, 1886

Dear Emily - You deserve a prompt answer to your hearty call for Jean & me to come down to see you – I would answer by taking the next steamer & bringing Jeanie with me - but there are matters & things - there is our new building just progressing on Fourth st. for one thing.
    The time will come, though, when I shall be on the Bermuda steamer again - D. V. - for a delightful lazy time with you & Russell & the dear youngsters.
    You should have come home this summer – that would have been the best for all of us.
    I am dead tired from being out late at a dance last night, so please with a forgiving spirit accept this as all for the present - not unmindful than even people living all summer in Bermuda sometimes write hurried 
notes.     With love to Russell & yourself & kisses to the delightful children.

                                                                Your’s
                                                    Rud

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[Rud to Emily]

THE OCEANIC
STAR ISLAND, N.H.

Aug. 10th 1886

Dearest Emily   -   I have been & went & gone & done it - to wit: found the sweetest girl in the world & persuaded her to tolerate me. The next time I come to Bermuda you will have to open your arms to a new sister - God willing. - She will be very welcome & will become very dear to you for her own loveliness.
    You dear child, away off in your paradise, knowing nothing of the world and the talk of the gossips - are you at all curious at this point.
    Do you skim over this page for a name. It is a dear sweet name.
    You wonder whether it is one heard before, or strange, calling up no familiar face & with which the thread of associations just now begins.
    If I could stand it, I would stop right here & let you enjoy yourself guessing for the next two weeks -- but I can’t. It has been hard enough to wait for your steamer day to make you a share in my happiness – So you are not to guess once but are to know that my Love is Maryette Smith - and now you are to write me a good letter and put your heart into it.
    We are to be here at the Oceanic until the 20th or later. - Your letter addressed here will follow me up if it does not find us still here.
    I think I shall be away from home till near the end of the month.
    With love to Russell & yourself & kisses to the dear children -

                                                                Your brother
                                                                    Rud

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[R. to Emily]

Wentworth Hall                    
White Mts. N. H.                 
Wednesday, Aug. 25th 1886

Dear Emily -
    We came in here from the Isles of Shoals last week & your letter reached us yesterday.
    Your plan is a charming one but I will have to wait a little longer – perhaps some months later we can come down and realize all the attractions you hold out — The Shepards from Fanwood, (?) N.J. are all here and inquired particularly after you & the Genl.
    We have done enough mountaineering to recall to me many times our days in Switzerland & the Tyrol. - Went up Mt. Washington on Monday by the carriage road from this side getting out & walking ahead at times as you & I used to do in the passes.
    It is just five weeks since I left home, a long stay for me but there has been every reason to prolong it. We have been a very happy party. On Monday next we start homeward. Capt. & Mrs. Smith & Maryette will stop a week or so in New York while I go directly to Columbus.
    We are off for a mountain climb this morning.

                                                        Yours with love
                                                                R.

P.S. Maryette wishes to thanks you for your note to her & sends her love. R.

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[Rud to Emily]

Oct. 19, 1886

Dear Emily - I have not sent you any money since last April and have now a balance of something over $900 to your credit. - On the other hand your share of cost of our new building on 4th St. down to this time is something more than $3000. When your balance is $1000 I will transfer it to this new building account, unless you otherwise direct, & when we get through with the new building will take your note to the estate for the amount still due from you secured by your interest in the Case property.     Will send you statement of your account when I thus balance it by carrying to the new building account.
    I have divided the furniture and effects left in the old home - except for the Bierstadt picture — into four parts, as equally as possible - & propose to assign these parts by lot - then when each one has his or her share thus determined by lot, perhaps we may effect trades or purchases with one another - There will doubtless be things falling to your share which you will not want & some of which I will perhaps want & be willing to buy of you.
    I propose to take the old house for a time of five years if all interested concur in such arrangement & desire it ---- agreeing to put the house in order & keep up repairs during the term and to pay the taxes which amount to about $700 per year.
    Let me know how you feel about such arrangement -
    I think that Maryette & I will be married in Dec. or early in January & you may expect to see us soon after - With love to the General & kisses to the dear children & yourself –

                                                                                Your’s
                                                                                    Rud

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[Rutherford to Emily]

Nov. 30th, 1886

Dear Emily - I have your’s of the 24th - Will see Fanny about exchanging the portraits & will have the things you mentioned packed and sent by the steamer two weeks hence - except two articles which do not fall to your lot. The little stand with drawers went to Laura & she prizes it especially, so that I shall say nothing to her about parting with it - and of the swinging mirrors, Mother asked for one some weeks ago & and I sent her the one that used to stand in her room before she moved, the other two as you see by the lists fell to Laura’s & Fanny’s lots. I can probably make some use of the rest of your things and am willing either to give you credit for $60 for them or to have some dealer in such things come in and put a value upon them. Write me in regard to this.
    The weeks pass rapidly & we will soon be with you if all goes well.
    We have changed from a morning to an evening wedding so as to give the Fremont relatives time to come down. They have a wedding there the evening of the 4th - Miss Addie Cook’s. I have had painters in the house cleaning the walls for more than two weeks past. The effect is good. Am only cleaning the down stair’s part.

                                                    Your’s with love.
                                                            R.

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[Rud to Emily]

Columbus, O.                 
Sunday, Dec. 26th, 1886

Dear Emily - I missed writing you by the last steamer - and none of us had a word from you. This time I will not put off to the busy week days the last message to go to you - the next will be our ship with ourselves on board I trust –and how eagerly we will be looking out for the f irst glimpse of Soucy and those who are there.
    I know that we will be glad to stay longer and feel sure too that you will be glad to have us - So please add another week which we know count on staying, and engage our return passage for Feb. 10th - Leaving N. Y. Jan. 10th I suppose we should arrive on the 16th and that will give us a good long visit - You must think of us the evening of the 5th at the Smith home – Dr. Babcock performing the ceremony, the house comfortably filled with the kinfolk on both sides and some few other friends - such as Henry and Maggie Taylor. Henry is to be my best man.
    The old house will be very charming when we get our things about us here. The painters have been at work for six weeks - mainly washing the walls & ceilings all of those down stairs - most of which came out as clean and bright as when first painted.
    New carpets in your two bed rooms down stairs and in the library. The upstairs we will have no use for until you & Russell come with your family and then the old home will be gay indeed.
    The clock, portrait, bedstead & bureau were sent in time for the last steamer & I hope to hear this week of their arrival in good condition. - No more at present but love and a Happy New Year to you & Russell & the dear children.

                                                                                Rud.

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