DRAFT OF A SPEECH
(WRITTEN IN RBH'S HANDWRITING, MAY OR MAY NOT HAVE ACTUALLY BEEN GIVEN)

[September 4, 1884]
[Cumberland, Maryland]Go back through all the history of the Indian Wars from the earliest colonial times down through more than two hundred and fifty years of warfare with the savages, and you will find no man who is more untiring, more sagacious, more daring, and more successful as an Indian fighter than General [George] Crook.

Stan[d]ing in the first rank among the warriors who have met and conquered the red man General Crook has gone far beyond any of them in the exhibition of wisdom and humanity in dealing with the tribes he has conquered in war.

No statesman or philanthropist in his closet has framed theories for the uplifting of the red man, which in spirt and aim are more worthy of a generous powerful and just Nation than the practical measures which General Crook has devised, and in the face of most formidable obstacles has successfully carried out in practical administration. To the worth that encircles the brow of the victorious commander in war he has added the pure fame which belongs to him who taking the part of a weak and almost friendless people has had the supreme good fortune to open for them an equal start and a fair chance in the area of life.