PRESIDENTIAL MIDWESTERN TOUR
CLYDE, OHIO FAIRGROUNDS

October 9, 1879
Clyde, Ohio

MY YOUNG FRIENDS, LADIES AND GENTLEMEN--

I shall detain you but a moment long enough only to make a sort of acquaintance with you , whom as residents of the county of my old home I am especially glad to meet. It so happens that I have not become so much personally acquainted with the people of the eastern part of Sandusky County as with those of the middle and western, and I rejoice at this opportunity of meeting you; and first let me say to the older ones about me, this is the farmer's season--much of your work is done, you are gathering in its fruits, and any one who sees the great productions of this year, and the good times again at hand can but feel that this is emphatically the farmer's year. Prosperity is returning to the people and it is largely due to the farmers of our land. Increased production, relying upon a good market abroad for a balance of trade in our favor, and upon the faithful redemption of our currency, is restoring prosperity to the people. Never before has so large a proportion of our crop gone abroad, and it will be still greater in the future. The city populations of the old world are becoming so great that the farming classes on across the water must raise more of the perishable products, fruits, etc.; and supplies of other products must come from this country more largely in the future than in the past. Not only is it our advancement in production, but our institutions and the stability of our agricultural classes, that will give us a[s] people increased prosperity. Whoever heard of a mob of farmers, or a lawless class of farmers? Such a thing is unknown. I am glad to see farming made more profitable and thus made better. It is a hopeful sign that the fairs, county, district and State, are this year being very largely attended. It has come to this, that not alone the products of the farm, but whatever adorns, educates and interests, is being represented at these fairs. Now we see at the Fair not merely the products of the soil and the herd, but fine arts, manufactures and woman's varied handiwork. Every where on my late visit to the West, so far as I could observe, the people brought of their production in all of these departments of labor to add to their interest. To these children gathered here today I freely say, I am glad to see them. They are an important part of society, and, my gray haired friends about me, it will be but a few years before these children will be a more important part of society than we. I greet you, children, cheerfully. I thank you for the compliment you pay me in coming out here to see me and hear what little I have said, and will not detain you longer.