Lucy Webb Hayes Correspondence
January 31, 1864 - December 21, 1864



to Sophia B. Hayes dtd Camp White, WV, January 31, 1864
to Sophia B. Hayes dtd Chillicothe, May [1864]
to Rutherford B. Hayes dtd Chillicothe, May 6, 1864
to Sardis Birchard dtd Chillicothe, May 8, 1864
to Rutherford B. Hayes dtd Chillicothe, May 14, [1864]
to Rutherford B. Hayes dtd Chillicothe, May 26, 1864
to Rutherford B. Hayes dtd Chillicothe, June 1, [864]
to Sophia B. Hayes dtd Chillicothe, June 6, 1864
to Rutherford B. Hayes dtd Chillicothe, June 15, 1864
to Sophia B. Hayes dtd Chillicothe, June 16, 1864
to Rutherford B. Hayes dtd Elmwood, June 26, 1864
to Rutherford B. Hayes dtd Chillicothe, July 8, 1864
to Rutherford B. Hayes dtd Chillicothe, July 21, [1864]
to Rutherford B. Hayes dtd Chillicothe, July 26, 1864
to [Margaret Scott Cook Boggs?] n.p., [July 26, 1864]
to Rutherford B. Hayes dtd Chillicothe, August 1, 1864
to Sardis Birchard dtd Chillicothe, August 1, 1864
to Rutherford B. Hayes dtd Chillicothe, August 9, 1864
to Sardis Birchard dtd Chillicothe, August 10, [1864]
to Dr. Joseph T. Webb n.p., August 11, [1864]
[from Webb C. & Rutherford P. Hayes, Lucy's children] to Dr. Joseph T. Webb dtd Chillicothe, August 11, [1864]
to Maria Cook Webb n.p., August 18, 1864
to Rutherford B. Hayes dtd Chillicothe, August 22, 1864
to Rutherford B. Hayes dtd Chillicothe, August 30, 1864
to Rutherford B. Hayes dtd Chillicothe, September 8, 1864
to Sardis Birchard dtd Chillicothe, September 10, 1864
to Rutherford B. Hayes dtd Chillicothe, September 13, 1864
to [Dr. Joseph T. Webb?] dtd Chillicothe, September 14, 1864
to Rutherford B. Hayes dtd Chillicothe, September 21, 1864
to Rutherford B. Hayes dtd Chillicothe, October 18, 1864
to Rutherford B. Hayes dtd Chillicothe, October 29, 1864
to Rutherford B. Hayes dtd Chillicothe, November 1, 1864
to Sardis Birchard dtd Chillicothe, November 15, 1864
to Rutherford B. Hayes dtd Chillicothe, November 23, 1864
to Rutherford B. Hayes dtd Chillicothe, December 8, 1864
to Rutherford B. Hayes dtd Chillicothe, December 21, 1864


Camp White West Va
Jany 31st 1864

Dear Mother Hayes-

We have been having most delightful spring weather- the children enjoy it very much- we are living in an old home- that years ago must have been highly improved- even now the garden is full of choice roses- and flowers of various kinds- the boys Webb and Rud are perfectly happy- hunting around for the first appearance of the little plants- great quantities of daffodils and jonquils - are springing up all over the yard and to day they found the Snowdrop just bursting its first leaves- We have a good deal to occupy our time - a little visiting each day - watching the arrival of the boats with our Companies returning- some sewing- a little sweeping and dusting- but no housekeeping the boys have a little dog which is a fine playfellow for them and a great favorite of mine as he shows a decided preference for me-

So many of our Soldiers and Officers had gone home on Veteran Furlough- that Camp had quite a deserted look it was really lonesome- but now we are cheering up- quite a number returned last week- and to day Company A- with their new recruits arrived- a little later in the Afternoon- we heard Music at a distance- there was a general outpouring from Camp. Our Band was on the way- and they were gladly received- the absence of the Band was felt by all- the influence of music over all is very great-

The Winter Quarters- are comfortable board houses- all of them I think with an upper room- great large stone fireplaces and chimneys- in the centre of the house- Our Camp now looks like a neat little village-

Mother's health is quite good- though she does not venture out- but very little- indeed she has not crossed the river since she came- I want her to see a little of Charleston at least- before she goes home- it must have been quite a pretty town before the war broke out-

We are getting anxious to see Birch- I did not think he would be absent so long- but he has been very happy and from Uncle's letters- he has enjoyed having Birch with him- Rutherford's furlough- will come along some day - though it seems quite long- since I first expected it- Mother and the boys join me in love and kindest regards to yourself and Mrs Wasson.

Yours Affec.
L.W.H.
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Chillicothe May- Monday Morn [1864]

Dear Mother Hayes-

Just received your letter to Mother - and have time to write but a few lines- We did not go to Cincinnati last week- as we had not been able to get our rooms- We will go in this morning train - will be there probably this week- expect to have our boarding on our return- The house we expect to go to- is not large- and is full we could not be certain of our own prospects- as we had to wait on the family- (Man and Wife) going out-

Aunt Phebe looked at the other boarding house for us but this was the only place she could get- it fortunately was the most desirable place in town - at least I think so- as to finding private boarding I do not know of any place in the town- Excuse the haste with which I have written as the omnibus is coming- I was surprised to hear you had decided to leave Delaware- So my letter travelled there first- My love to all-

Yours Affec
L.W.H.
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Chillicothe. May 6th 1864

Dearest R.

We reached here safely- the little boys in fine spirits and bright anticipations of seeing the Cousins- We passed through the City stopping only from day light till the afternoon train- Mother and the boys did not leave the boat- I hastily visited Mr Stevenson- then called to see his wife- but she has been very sick again- then said how are you to Aunttie [sic] Warren- a few moments to congratulate Sallie Perry now Mrs Pollok- then five minutes with Mrs Davis- and back to the boat-

So much changing and bustle- since we parted- that the full realization of my loneliness- has not been felt-

Brother Jim was very kind to us all- Seeing Mrs Ellen- Rice and Shermice on the Cars- I hope they will reach home safely- The friends here are glad to see us- welcomed us warmly and truly- Uncle Scott I think was particularly gratified with your remembrance of him- the chair is so comfortable- just fits his back- Birch and Webb are there- little darling wants to go- but our sorrowful countenances prevent him- We have seen the rooms we are to have- two rooms (one a front room) about the size of our rooms at Camp- a little wee room - joining them intended for a servant- but which our boys will have for their own property- we will have them in about ten days or a week- Mrs Smart who has been occupying them- is going to house keeping- and was to have given them up- the first of May- but the sudden and dangerous illness of her father- Mr Woodbridge- has prevented her leaving- night before last he died leaving nothing for his children- as is supposed- We will go to Cincinnati next week- I think- and have what I want to make us at home sent up- Myself and three children will be fifty dollars a month- Our rooms are in the wing and can be entirely separated form the rest of the house- that will suit me you know-

Mrs Comly has a son- but you have probably heard it before- Remember me to all- With much love dearest

Your Affc-
L.W.H.

Jim McKell is Capt- on General Butterfield's Staff- Tell Joe Mother is well- and I think we will be pleasantly situated- Where are. you now-
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Chillicothe May 8th 1864

Dear Uncle-

We are once more in the States- and having decided to remain in Chillicothe- through the Summer at least- and probably have it for home until Rutherford returns- Of course I do not know how we will like it- but intend to make the best, the house where we have engaged boarding- has always been a desirable place- I will have two small rooms- pleasant and convenient with children- then the yard is very large and the family like children- when we get settled I will write you more fully- the little boys are all at Uncle Scott's- Mother and I will go to Cincinnati this week- to get some articles of furniture- and arrange the carpets and things for summer- Rutherford wrote you before he left. We saw the last of R and the Regt [sic] last Sunday Morning- just a week ago- but it seems much longer- we reached Cincinnati Tuesday Morning- took the Afternoon Cars for Chillicothe- tired saddened and feeling desolate and lonely- but looking forward for better days when we will all be at home-

Monday Morning- All well- the little boys have just come in from Uncle Scotts- to start to school- they would rather be in the country- I had a few lines from Rutherford- not saying where they were ordered- so all I know is the march to Gauley Bridge- our old camping ground Camp Reynolds Birchie talks a great deal about his friends at Speigle [sic] Grove- he has a letter to write to you but commenced printing- then wanted me to write and so his letter is still on hands- he sends his love to all and would like this Summer to be with you- how is Rock- though I say he has no right to hear from him till he writes himself-

Mother wishes to be remembered to all the friends- Love to all

Yours Affec.
L.W.H.
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Chillicothe- May 14th [1864]

Dearest R-

Time passes so slowly- and sadly- without a letter from you- There is but little mention of Gen Crook's division- Princeton was the only place mentioned- I try to think where you are- for if I only know where you are or have been- it brings you closer to me-

The little boys are well- Birchie and Webb are at Uncle Williams- little Rud went home with Aunt Margret yesterday- we did not go to Cincinnati this week as we expected- but will go Monday- next week we will be settled the boys will have a fine yard to play in- no other children in the house- and I do hope the little fellows will be happy they are dear boys- and I long - to be quietly settled with them- I am very well- and for your sake I will be cheerful- and hope for happy days to come- The news from Gen Grant- is confirmed- it is almost with fear and trembling I hear of our successes- then Butler he has been doing all right- and every thing looks hopeful- oh that it may be so- last night we heard that forty thousand prisoners had been taken- that Gen Grant held the battle field and the wounded and all the news has been good no dispatches of victory one day- to be taken back the next- the anxiety the fear- it is terrible how could we stand news of reverses now- I have written to your Mother and Uncle Birchard- not time for a reply from them yet- Chillicothe is very quiet- very few of the old people are now living- Mr John Woodbridge died last week- and Mrs James is failing fast- The girls and Aunt Phebe send much love to you Mother is quite well- love to you and Joe Remember me to all my friends I have but little hope that you or Joe have received my letters or that this will reach you

Good bye dearest

Yours L.W.H.
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Chillicothe- May 26th 64

My dearest R-

After weeks of great anxiety- I received your dispatch of the 20th (on 21st ) dearest I do not think you know- the great joy it is to hear so speedily that you are safe and well- thinking of the dear wife and loving boys- Saturday I received the letter of 13th it was sad news to hear so many true noble souls had fallen- every where are weeping mourning souls- yet I am spared- I cannot tell you the sorrow and sympathy I have for our mourning friends- -

You can have no definite idea where we are- and as it is so unpleasant to me to think of you- without being able to follow- or at least imagine I can follow your route- I will try and give you some idea- of our new home- The house is kept by three sisters- the table is always nice- good food- well cooked- like home cooking- no style- but comfort- the children eat with us at the table- and they are little gentlemen- Our rooms are in the wing- second story- fronting the St- (4th St) a little back in the yard- three windows in the front room- one opening on the porch- bed room back- a pleasant room- though smaller- then on the porch a little wee room- just the sixe [sic] for the boys- to have for their Study and play room- the desk you gave them is a great source of happiness- they are so loving- so anxious to be kind to me- dear boys- their best natures are shown- Little Webb cannot think of the loss- the suffering and sorrow- but the glory the victory you have gained- Birchie thinks more of desolate homes and hearts- Ruddy darling is with Aunt Margret- we look for him soon- we all want to see him- I feel dearest that I will be happier here than I could be any where else- separate as I am from you- the little boys will make garden- and have a few chickens- I will try to raise them the best I can- and as near like what their dear father would have me- I know my weaknesses and failings dearest-

Where is brother Joe- and how is he have you either received letters from me- I have written often- to both of you- Mother is quite well- busy getting our new home settled-

Has the flag been received yet- I did not see it- then heard it was gone- and did not write to any of you about it- Let me know if you have received it and whether it has been presented-

I hope to hear from you very soon- from the dispatches the wounded were being sent to Gauly- then I suppose to Charleston- if you have time give me as many particulars as you can- Remember me to all friends- not forgetting my friends the soldiers-

With anxious hearts we wait to hear from you again- Webb would like to be remembered to Gen Crook- he gained the boys heart-

Nobody reaches Danville- so our poor cousin will still linger in prison- Remember me to all-

Your Affec
Loving L.W.H.
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Chillicothe June 1st [1864]

Dearest R-

Yesterday received your letter of the 19th although a long while on the way it was warmly welcomed- With what happiness I read of the noble daring and courage of our own 23rd but I do not boast of it or repeat- "only roll it like a sweet morsel under my tongue"--

You do not know darling- what happy feelings of love and joy are with me- when in your letters you wish I had been with you- that I would enjoy and appreciate with you-

Last night- I could hardly shake off- the sadness and loneliness I felt but I read your letter over again and again- My boys talked of dear Pa Pa- and I began to feel all the goodness that was shown to me- and that follows me all the time- but if I could only see you- but I will make it up in loving and thinking- I will quit talking of myself- and tell you what we are doing- We have been here a little more than a week- are feeling quite home like- the little boys have a nice garden laid off prettily- partly vegetables the rest flowers- that is the seeds are planted- I bought them a small rake and hoe- the yard is large- and they stay in it- you need not fear they will run the Streets- School will be out in three or four weeks- and now they are preparing for examinations- so I still attend to them the boys myself- a while- Aunt Margret still has Rud- I told them it was a hard case when I loaned them a child not to be able to get him back- the little rascal sent me word he was coming to see me on his birthday- The anxiety with which we watch Grants movement's- is intense I fear and tremble- then hope and believe that it will soon be over- the right- justice- and mercy prevail-

I wish I could have seen the Flag before it went- now I fear it may not be what it ought to be- or that you have not got it- Not an hour passes that I do not think of our wounded and dying- and wish that I could do something for them- if they are near you now- remember me to them- that I sympathize with them- and would esteem it such a privelige [sic] to be able to do something in their suffering- Our band must feel proud of their endurance but as Webb says- "Why it is the the [sic] Twenty third- to his mind that is conclusive-

We have had many of our old friends call to see us- all are glad to see us- I shall write to Uncle Birchard and Mother Hayes soon- We have had no late word from any of the Cousins- Mother is quite well- joins in a great deal of love to you and Dr-

Remember me to my numerous friends- With best wishes and prayers for your safety and success- Mama and the boys say Good bye to papa-

Yours
L.W.H.

Uncle Scott is very unwell- looks worse than I have ever seen him- if you could write to him- I wish you would I would forego my own pleasure in a letter to have him enjoy one from you-
Lu

I am boarding at McClures- if any one comes or you send a dispatch- a young man from the Telegraph office boards here- also-
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Chillicothe June 6th 64

Dear Mother Hayes-

We returned from the country Saturday evening - had a very pleasant visit- Birch and Webb were with us- but little Rud is visiting on his own account we expect him home soon-

We do not hear often from Rutherford or the Dr- not a word since the 20th I was very much disappointed to receive no word last week- but I know it is almost impossible to get letters from their present march- they were very well- when they wrote and liking their Gen- very much- You speak of coming here for a visit if we could arrange it- here in our boarding house it is full- and I have but one bed- I have not fixed yet for the children- they have a little Mattrass [sic] - I shall either get a trundle bed for them or a lounge that can be made into a bed- I could not think of asking Aunt Phebe- to take you to board- but if she were well I should not hesitate to invite you to visit her- She has been quite sick for the last week- not able to be out of her bed much of the time- she is in miserable health- and we all feel great anxiety about her- she is in great distress about her son poor fellow he has been a prisoner for eight months- and has heard nothing from him for more than three months- the two little girls and the oldest son at home - have had chills for the last month- it seems almost impossible to get rid of chills when once they come on- The children often speak of you- and Birch says he owes you a letter but he will have to wait till he writes plainer- he dont want to print-

We have just received a letter from Dr- dated 30th they were well- to move the next morning- Children send their love-

Yours truly
L.W.H.
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Chillicothe June 15th 64

Dearest R-

Yesterday noon I received the dispatch you sent from Staunton on many accounts it was a great relief to me- once more you are within reach by letter or telegraph- it is terrible to think you are marching over the mountains- no way to reach you-

This beautiful morning- June 17th we are all well- the little boys very happy in their new home- their play room is small- but it has room for a great deal of happiness- Webb is now standing by me- looking loving and smiling- just now he says- writing to Papa with a pleasant smile- showing his new teeth- and sending messages- Little Rud is at Aunt Margrets- very happy- does not intend to come home till his birthday- which is the 24th Birch and Webb miss him very much- they want him especially to play ball- I often think darling as I look at my boys- what dear good children they are- loving and sympathizing - and what a comfort dear papa will have with his boys when once more with us all-

Last evening I received your letter of the 25th and Mother Joe's of 24th- from Meadow Bluff- and all though we have both received of later date- 30th and 31st yet they were so welcome- Moses's happiness made me happy- I hope the wife and little chicks may yet be united with him- Capt Hood has been here- brought your Valise- Send shoe and leather case with R Candles- Mother having no confidence in any thing Rebellious fears the Candles- very much to Birchard's surprise and astonishment-

Now about the flag- Why did not Major Mc or who ever took it take it to you- I want our soldiers to know that I sent it to them- It is something like the Apples I sent to Capt Gilmore's men- I dont think they ever knew it- Well enough of that- let them know how near they are to me- that not a day passes that our gallant soldiers are not remembered by me- Capt Hood was looking better- and really felt better when here- he had a pleasant visit at Uncle Scotts- and his old friends Mr Jordan received him warmly- I sent some little things- fruit and pickles to our wounded at Charleston- he went back on Monday- Yesterday poor Duncan Coons died very suddenly poor fellow- his Mothers property never did him any good- I suppose the Hon William Allen- feels better now that the dependent heir is gone-

All our friends are well- all feel so much solicitude about you- the paper yesterday in speaking of Hunter's movements- say Danville will yet be visited by you- My poor Cousin and to think our poor wounded at Cloyds Mt- have all been taken there- As I thought of Lt Abbot when I heard- the brutal rebels had taken them away- I was sick sick [sic] at heart- Why is it God allows such terrible cruelty in any human being- I do not dare to let myself think of our prisoners- for then I can almost imagine- President Lincoln as their tormentor- and keeper- by his cruel kindness to rebel prisoners- God grant you may be saved to us- I shall direct this in a formidable manner- Mother wrote Joe a long letter last week- and I have written every few days to you- We all think constantly of you- and wish you could only see how pleasantly we are situated- Poor Mrs McCulloch of Circleville- her only boy Tommy was killed in a Skirmish in Georgia- he was Capt- she is left poor- and dependent-

Remember me to all my friends- Webb sends his love to Gen Crook wishes he could write to him- Remember me to him.

Your Affc.
L.W.H.
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Chillicothe June 16th 64-

Dear Mother Hayes-

Yesterday I commenced writing to you but was prevented all day- and now it is so late I fear you will not get it- I have had no letters since they left Meadow Bluff- which was the 1st of June- but on the evening of the 14th I received a dispatch from Staunton Va- they had joined Gen Hunter on the 8th and on the 13th the day he sent the dispatch they were all well- it is a great relief to have some idea where they are- We are all quite well- little Rud is in the country- which is a great convenience as I have not got their little bedsted for them yet- Birch and Webb are very well- have a garden some flowers- corn and tomatoes- they enjoy working in it very much-

Our friends are all well in the country- Aunt Phebes little girls have the chills- but are not very sick with them Birch and Webb are just now chopping very lively across the St- it is a great treat to them to have any chopping they can do- I have just written to Rutherford but am in doubt where to direct- Love to all- Birch says tell Ruddy he wishes he was here- they would have a nice time- Let me hear from you often-

Yours Affec.
L.W.H.
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Elmwood June 26th 64

Dearest-

I am thinking of you constantly- longing to hear from you thinking of the dangers and suffering through which you are passing- but while sad thoughts are with me- I think of your love- your tenderness and kindness to me- and feel that could I only be with you- could I only know that you will be returned to me- Oh darling one what would life be without you- Our dear boys have many anxious thoughts of papa- Birchie is kind and sympathizing and a companion- little Webb- is affectionate and loving- hoping for papa return- but not thinking of danger- they talk constantly of you and many plans are laid when papa comes home- I have been at Elmwood since Thursday- will be here this week that will be the last of my visiting for a while- without I had a chance to see you- that I dont think I could resist- Little Ruddy is here- has been here nearly six weeks- a noble little fellow- he will go home with me- then you can think of a loving wife and three dear boys sitting together- thinking of you- hoping and praying that you will return to them- I had a letter from Mother hayes a few days ago she wrote cheerfully- was in Columbus I think I told you in my other letters that Capt Hood came to C brought your Valise with its contents and the sword- Last Tuesday Carrington and the little sorrel reached Chillicothe- Uncle Scott is attending to him will have him sold I think- he has had him taken care of by a good horse man- they all think him a fine animal and looking very well for such a journey- I paid Carrington $47- $30 you mentioned in your letter then the expenses on the way- and his fare to Columbus I saw Gen Scammon's name among the prisoners taken to Charleston- L Co- I feel so sorry for his family- his daughter was married a few weeks ago- We have had very hot dry weather- for some weeks but have had a little rain last week and to day- enough to do a little good- but rain is wanted very much- Our dear boys have been experiencing the anxiety of a farmer for his crops- their corn has suffered much for want of rain- but now they are happy- I have received your two letters from Staunton- 8- 9th though old they were read with great delight- also Joe's

I was surprised to hear Capt Rice and Canby had left the service- and very sorry to hear that Lt Chamberlain had also- but I cannot judge of their reasons- We hear occasionally from Jim McKell- a letter yesterday then John Boggs in with the National Guard of Indiana- 135 Regt- they are at Bridgeport- Alabama- he has stood it well- and in fine spirits-

I have no news to write- nothing in our little quiet town- and I do not hear from Cincinnati- any thing of our friends- indeed dearest- I dont believe we think talk or care for any thing but the War- and many and fervent prayers are offered that it will soon close- and once more have the dear ones with us- Good bye dearest remember me to my many friends in the Twenty third- God preserve you all- All join in love

Write often as you can-
Yours L.W.H.
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Chillicothe. July 8th 64

Dearest R.

What would I not give to be starting to see you- but as I am here- must be contented- The little folks were almost wild with joy at seeing Uncle Joe- I have been very well- but to day am almost nervous- so you may pass that by- do write to me as often as you can- you know my weakness- so I send a picture of little Rud- which I wish you to place in your book- and also one of Birch- it is the best I can get of him- I do not like the ones you have of Webb and Rud- so please place there in and gratify a Mother's foolish pride-

Good bye dearest- what would I not give to see you-

Yours truly
L.W.H.
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Chillicothe. July 21st [1864]

My dearest-

We are all thinking of you- and feeling so thankful for the few moments we were with you- this hard separation makes us dearer to each other you forget all failings of Spouse and only the lovely things are present with you- Our dear little boys are all with me When they left you- or rather watched the Car which carried dear papa away- they came home a little sad- but Birchie- sat down and cried as though his heart would break- he could not say anything to me- for a long while- and then with sobs told me how hard it was to see you go- he loves you very dearly- and now if there is any thing for him to do which is not suited to his feelings- I say to him- Birchie papa would want you to do it- that is enough- I received your letter from Parkersburg- how I envied the day spent there- since then I have hoped for a letter- We hear nothing from you- Mother and little Rud were out at Uncle Williams- Rud says tell you he helped pick potatoes- and is a very useful boy- Webb was right sick one day- I trembled when I thought of the chills- and what would I do- but by dint of scolding coaxing and reasoning with an unreasonable little youngster- I kept him comparatively quiet- and out of the Sun now he has recovered- but I keep watch over him-

The little fellows are still very happy with their garden- I have a beautiful boquet sitting on my table from it- but wont you be tired of my scrawl- nothing but the old song my boys- My boys- Heard from James McKell on Monday he was well- in yesterdays paper we saw the death of Brig Gen Dan McCook- that family have given their blood freely for our country- his poor wife- -

I must close- children and Grand Ma send much love-

Write often if but a few lines

Love to You.
Your Affec. L.W.H.
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Chillicothe July 26th 64

My dearest R-

The time passes slowly and wearily when day after day no letters- but all the time I know and feel that I am not forgotten- that the long looked for letters will come some day- and however old will be joyfully received-

My dear boys occupy my time pretty closely and they are happy have very loving pleasant memories of their dear father- I have just called them from their play for a little study- all right says Birch- and of course Webb and Rud must come with their Oracle- Birch and Rud are very well- but Webb our little fine know[?]- has grown quite thin- had a little fever one or two days which pulled him down very much- he is now beginning to look better- Mother keeps well- though she has great anxiety about you and Dr-

I am as well as could be hoped for dont go out but little- but constantly strive to look on the bright and hopeful side- General McPherson's death was like hearing of a friend I knew and loved- so many good brave men are falling that it makes the heart heavy-

We have another stricken family with us now- Mrs Rerrick has lost one of her twin boys he was wounded in Georgia lingered awhile in the hospital at Nashville- his Mother got to him before he died- and in the midst of her sorrow has the consolation of closing his eyes in death- I have just returned from the funeral- he wanted to be buried at home- I hope you have got well of your boil- a right severe thing I expect it has been-

Now I have a little business- a request or favor to ask- if possible- Uncle Williams son Isaac- is subject to the draft- he is anxious to be in service again- but we all fear he could not stand the exposure

Mr Hough called to see me- yesterday- and said he wished me to write to you- that if Ike could get on a Staff he could get him the appointment- he stood well at the Military School- and can get recommendation from his Col- is there anything you or brother Joe could do- any vacancy that he could fill- I do not know how to write asking any thing of the kind- but you will excuse my blunder- and for my sake if there is any thing that could be done for him in the Brigade or Division I know you will do it- let Joe know what I have written- he is a fine young fellow- We are well let us hear from you as soon as possible- Write so I can show your letter- I fear you can do nothing- and yet I hope you will

Affc.
L.W.H.
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[Jly 26, 1864]
Wesnesday [sic] morning

Dear Aunt

Enclosed I Send Joes last letter received Friday. They have had a severe time - Saturday received a few lines from Rutherford dated 29th they were just preparing to leave. Again we do not know where they are - but trust in a kind protecting Providence - Joe wrote another letter on 29th which we sent to you - in it he says R was struck by a spent ball on the shoulder - but not hurt. How is Birtie I hope he is a good boy - We are all well - also at Aunt Phoebs Uncle McKell left for New York this morning -

Good bye
L

[See verso letter of RBH to Lucy dtd Jly 26, 1864.]
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Chillicothe. August lstl864

My dearest-

I can hardly believe it is the first of August - the time has passed so rapidly that I can not realize it- I can not write of any change in our life- My dear boys are good and loving- all I could wish- talk a great deal with me of their dear father- and all want to hear the news- read it loud Ma Ma- any thing from the 23rd As I read Major General Crook- Webbs eyes glistened and say it again Ma-Ma- then Birch says that is your General- Webb- so they had a happy time over the General promotion I dont think any of his friends rejoiced with more sincere true joy- Birchie is now making a visit to Aunt Margret- I am getting so petted on my boys that I hate to part with them even for their own happiness-

We were wakened this morning by Music from the Band- soon found that the 1st of August was being "celebrated" in grand style- poor negroes- will they ever be much better off.

Our house is very quiet- only Mrs Douglass Mary- Mother- self children- and too [sic] gentleman [sic] here at present- all the others away visiting- it suits me exactly and if it was not such intensely warm weather- I would be very glad to be over my troubles- six weeks or two months at the farthest- some times I feel badly almost low spirited dread so much the change of doctors but what am I complaining for- when I think of all the goodness and kindness showered upon me- I dont want to utter a complaint- but what joy it will be to meet you again- I think either my boys or their mother must be very popular- from their daily visitor- little boys and girls- When my powers of endurance are at an end- I send my boys to Aunt Phebes-

When I shall want money- Mr Stevenson has it- but I wish you would write him to send me some- Our board is $50 a month- then washing $5 or $6 and various little articles to be got- I am not out of money- but I dislike to write to Mr S- for it- I also think the house rent should be raised if we do not think of it- he will not- at least I would like my board and washing to come from 6th St- I am getting quite brave- the terrible rumors of disaster- defeat and destruction of your little army which came last week- while I could not help fearing- yet did not overwhelm me- and then your dispatch so kind and considerate you are- how it relieved my mind- you were safe- I now look every day for a letter- Saturday I received your letter that was mislaid- only a few lines from Harpers Ferry - but showing you thought of me- I received a letter from Laura- she wrote in good spirits they were all well-

Uncle Scotts health is very poor- we cannot help feeling very uneasy about him- I wrote you last week- asking if any thing could be done for Isaac Cook Uncle Williams - son- Mr Hough is very anxious and spoke to me about it- he is pretty well- but could not bear the life of a private- All the friends join in love- Mother and the boys send their love to father and Uncle Joe-

Yours Affc.
L.W.H.
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Chillicothe. Aug 1st 64

Dear Uncle-

We are all well and think of you often- but we are living such a hum drum life- nothing to write about- and the weather so intensely hot- that we can hardly keep ourselves comfortable much less cool- the little boys keep well and have a happy time- they often speak of you- Birch talks a great deal about his friends at Fremont and the happy times he had there- We were made very happy by a call from Dr Joe and then to our great joy Rutherford was allowed to come by Chillicothe- when the troops were ordered East- it was but a short visit- but occasioned the greatest joy.

We were very uneasy last week- the terrible rumors of disaster and defeat to Gen Crooks little army was dreadful to hear- but something keeps me from being overwhelmed I have been so kindly dealt with for the past three years- that now I feel I must trust and look on the bright side- Some times every thing is dark and gloomy- but my children they are with me- and we talk constantly of their dear father- he is their idol their pattern of all that is good- I think R- felt very happy to see how home like we were living- said he wished you could see us- We all second the wish- Our little town is pretty hot but we have not an usual amount of sickness- this fall you must certainly make us a visit- Uncle Scott is not well- we feel more anxiety about him- he has such a large family that it is very sad to think he may be taken from them- Birchie is now making a visit to Aunt Margret's. If you get Cleveland papers with any news from the Regt send them to me I have not seen much mention made of them in our papers- I had a dispatch from R. dated the 27th the disaster was greatly exaggerated by stragglers- I cannot tell you the sadness the death of Gen McPherson occasioned us all- every person seemed to feel it peculiarly losing him - it was a dear bought victory- All join in love- remember me to the friends-

Yours Affc.
L.W.H.
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Chillicothe. August 9, 64

My dearest R-

Your letter of 29th is before me- though but a few lines your love for me is shown so plainly that I could not read it without weeping- how often I think I am the happiest woman living-

I was so fortunate as to receive the dispatch you sent me- the relief was great- although I would not allow myself to think evil could have happened you- do not think me selfish- for while my heart is full of joy of thankfulness that my dear ones are spared to me- My tears are flowing for the thousands mourning- but our own Regiment- oh how near they are to me- The new flag has been baptized in blood- I would like to know who is Color Bearer this terribly hot weather- we all think of our soldiers- we have had the Agents of the Christian Commission in Chillicothe- Judge Storer- Mr Chamberlain - (do you know him personally- for he alluded very prettily and feelingly to our friend Col. R.B.H. who had just been nominated by the 2nd district- and of the happiness the news gave him) Puds was not at meeting- to hear it- may be a few tears would have stolen down her cheek- had she been there- but what am I writing-

Our dear boys are well- Birchie in the Country- Webb and Rud tormenting Ma Ma- or Aunt Phebe they have a grand play house- there and have commenced school with Lizzie and Ellie for teachers- they are so good and loving- talk so much of dear papa and Uncle Joe- I have just heard an interesting conversation near my window- with the old gardener who supplies Mrs Strader - and some person wanting to buy Onions- Well I sells them for $1.50 a bushel- but if you wants them for the soldiers- why $1.25- that is the feeling- We hear from Joe Fullerton- Jim McKell- often they are well- Gen Force was wounded through the face- Col Noyes has lost his foot- glorious wounds- If you have time dearest- and could write to Uncle Scott- or Aunt Phebe or Lu- I would be so glad- will let an old letter do for my share that time- have you the slightest idea of the estimation in which R.B.H. is held- by divers and sundry persons persons near of Kin- to your spouse

If proper remember me affectionately to my friends Webb joins with Mama- in kind regards to Gen. C.

Love to Dr-

Yours Affc-
L.W.H.

Mother and little ones join-

Many thanks to you and brother Joe for your letters- since the reverse at Winchester- had such a good kind letter from Uncle Birchard-
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Chillicothe August 10 [1864]

Dear Uncle

I received your very kind letters- and would gladly visit you - but cannot this summer it may be well for you- for undoubtedly I would make the "Corner Store" suffer- I have had one long letter from R dated 29th and one or two very short but expressive ones- They have been having a very severe Campaign- and where they are now I have no idea- it is a very anxious time for us all- but hope for the best- I have great confidence in Gen Crook- I received a letter yesterday from our friend John M Herron announcing his great pleasure in Rutherford's Nomination of course dear Uncle it is very gratifying to know how he stands with our citizens and friends- I wonder if all women or wives have such an unbounded admiration for their better half- but that I must keep a secret- I often think I am a little like the children- Call in question something they have done and they answer- "Why papa said so"- it is sufficient- If you knew how glad we all are to receive a few lines from you- you would often write- We are really suffering for rain- the corn look well- but rain is wanted to fill it out- the boys little garden looks well-

Last year I was to have got some Vinegar from Mr Vallettes for pickles but was too late to put up but a few- now I want to do a little more in that line- pickles either for R's Mess- or Hospital- and I can get no cider vinegar here if without to [sic] much trouble and expense you could send me some from Mr V- I would be so glad Sent either to me or care of Wm McKell- but dont take any trouble about it- I was very sorry to hear Mr Vallette health was not recovered- give my love to them- how I should enjoy stepping in quietly and seeing you all- Love to friends-

Yours Affec.
L.W.H.
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August 11th [1864]

Dear Brother -

The boys were delighted they have not recovered their equanimity of temper yet - I have written several times lately which I do not suppose you will ever receive - day before yesterday I wrote to R - but it may wander round- Webb wishes you had sent such a pretty envelope like Birchies. The box you asked for I remember very well - it was sent to Gallipolis with Lt McKinley box - this I know positively and certainly - All our friends are well and received cards from Miss Kate Myers now Mrs Taylor - Write soon - so you have seen our old friends the Rudys - When war is over we will visit them - This Envelope is Birch Webbs selection - All send love.

Your affec
L.

He would like to send you one with Col. Gen - but Birch would price him out-
Lu

[This letter on verso LWH to Joseph Webb same date]
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Chillicothe August 11th [1864]

My dear Uncle Joe-

We went to the Post office yesterday and there found your letter directed to us- We came home on double quick Our garden does pretty well we have had twenty two cucumbers- and will have a good many more if it will only rain- Our beans were full- We made frames for the tomatoes- but they grew so fast and are so full that they have broken the frames. Our pop corn is very high and on some of the stalks I counted 6 ears- the Ever green sugar corn is nice and I want you to have some of it-

I wish you could be here to eat the big Cantalope [sic] that is growing I know it will be good-

But oh the flower garden- this morning we got a beautiful boquet-[sic] White red pink purple scarlet- and crimson Verbenas- Mignonette- Portulacca red white and yellow- sweet fern- geranium leaves- and Salvia- if I could only send it to you- how glad I would be- this leaf is from my last- We have a play house at Aunt Phebe's and we go there every morning- Mama says to torment Aunt Phebe- but we are going- to school to Lizzie and Ruddy to Ellie- we have had two parties and we dont like to have too much company it spoils our fun- Lizzie and Ellie are making Comfort bags for the soldiers- they put in Scissors- button needles and fine comb and thread- dont you think it is nice- Papa little horse is out at Uncle Scott's- he is looking better and behaves himself has not eaten any body yet- Uncle Birchard has got me a little colt- he says it is halter broke so now I guess it is almost ready to ride- Rud says nobody has a colt for me- I have not been to see Aunt Lucy since but Birchie is there now-

Aunt Diathea Ed and Mary went on East for May- Dr Comegys boys are all there so Mama wont let us be out there much-

Good bye dear Uncle
Webb Hayes Rud Hayes
X X
[his mark] [his mark]
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August 18, 1864

Dear Mother-

All well this morning. Mag McKell staid with me last night. A letter from Jim yesterday, he is well, no news.

Poor Harriet Wilson and two of her children died very sudden, supposed to be poisoned - poor things. You know how badly she felt about leaving her children.

If nothing happens he will be up some day next week. He is not positive.

Good-bye and love to you all

Yours Lu

I have just written to Jim, telling him what Joe has written you.
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Chillicothe Aug 22nd 64

My dearest R-

The time is very long when we do not hear from you- day after day I look and hope for something from you- nothing since your letter dated 8th but even then we are better off than you- we do get the old letters while you have nothing except to know that we have written regularly and constantly- and that no day nor hour passes that you are not in my thoughts- Our dear little boys are well- Birchie still in the country- Webb and Rud so loving and affectionate- clinging around us- talking of dear papa- or Webb's merry singing laugh as he thinks of some funny story you have told them Every Memory or thought they have of papa is one of pleasure- they often say if papa was only here wouldnt it be nice- he would do it for us- and so with Mama and children every thought and recollection of papa is sweet and pleasant-

My birthday is coming round again how rapidly the years pass- and what a joyous reunion it will be- when once more we are all together- I have felt so confident always- that at times I almost tremble- at the bare thought of what might be our sorrow-

But dearest we think of you constantly hoping and praying- I have not felt well enough to go about any hardly since you left- indeed I do not attempt to walk out any where- Uncle Scott comes to see us nearly every day- and all our friends seem to remember us kindly- I write as often as I can to your Mother and Uncle-

Always on receiving a letter from you- I have no news to write- I have not heard from Cin- for sometime- Col Noyes is there- you know he has lost a foot- and Gen Force who was shot through the face- I did hear that his tongue was cut- but hope it is not so- I had a a [sic] very kind letter announcing your Nomination from John W Herron- they have moved to the city

Corner of 4th and Broadway- and have a welcome corner for their friends- The little boys send a sweet smelling leaf from their garden- and with it a great deal of true love to papa and Uncle Joe- Mother joins me in much love to you- both-

Good bye, dearest-

Your Affc.
Loving L.W.H.
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Chillicothe. August 30th 64

My dearest R-

We were so glad to receive your letter written to Birchie dated 20th You will probably receive a large batch of letters if ever they are distributed- for I have written generally twice a week Yours I think we generally receive about 8 or 10 days after date- but we are so glad to receive them that we do not mind the date- Birch was very happy on receipt of your first letter- with fancy picture and envelope- Webb and Rud at the same time- by one from Uncle Joe which they answered immediately but Birch being in the Country- when he received it has not done so yet

The boys are very well- have not been sick at all this summer- they are happy- and a great comfort to Mama and Grandma- next week Birchie and Webb start to school-

I wrote you some time ago about Isaac Cook- he was supposed to be enrolled and as the number from his township was near 100- there was not much chance that he would escape- but on examination of the roll- he was not down- so with a lightened heart he and Ed Cook- have gone back to school- Military Academy at West Chester- Pa-

Last week I heard from Columbus all were well there- Uncle Birchard speaks of Mr Vallette as failing rapidly they have gone to Canada- but Uncle seemed to think it doubtful whether Mr V- would live long- We received cordial invitations to visit him- but I could not- the boys would have been delighted- but it would have been too much care for Uncle Webb is very happy in anticipation of his Colt- he is extremely fond of horses- It is very hard to feel cheerful and hopeful about our Country- the butter nuts are very free in their talk and in some localities- speak openly of barns being burnt- miserable wretches- both in Uncle Williams and Uncle Moses- neighborhood- they have insinuated such a thing as likely to happen- All well a [sic] Aunt Phebe's but her anxiety is most intense- she has almost given up hope of ever hearing of Willie's fate- James McKell is well writes in good spirits- I wish he would be promoted- This little town is quiet beyond endurance almost and I really fear that were I not so tied down- and likely to be so this winter- I would get almost too homesick but it is the best place for us now and will not be so lonesome to me- when I can go about a little more. Another birthday has passed- Puds is growing old-

Capt Douglas family are well- the little boys have been here this morning playing with our boys- I have sent you papers and will do so again to day- although you do not receive any letters from us- you do not doubt the love- the daily prayers for your safety- I never felt more deeply my happy lot- and although separated from you- you are constantly in my heart- filling it with love and pride in the one so dear to me-

I wish I could give you some thing of interest in my letters- but I can only repeat my old thoughts- Good bye all join in a great deal of love to papa and Uncle Joe- Ever your devoted wife-

L.W.H.

I hope it is true- "The darkest hour is just before day-" may it be so- all is dark and gloomy-
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Chillicothe. Sept. 8th 64

My dearest R-

Yesterday was a happy day for me- two letters from you of late date 30- Aug- 1- Sept- I felt that I was near to you again with the Receipt for Money- $700 safely enclosed- Uncle Scott will attend to it for me- We are all very well- Birchie and Webb started to school last Monday- it was a very important day- Birchie enters into his studies with great interest- Webb is very amusing- it is his most important time of life- actually gone three days to school- and no black Marks yet- in spelling "he is even" to use his own words- been turned down once himself- and once the turner down- you would laugh to hear him talk- dear little fellows- they are no trouble to me- Birchie watches Webb- and then Webb is so honest and kind he dont want to make me feel bad- and his love for papa so great and unbounded that he dont want me to have any black marks to report to him- At night you can imagine us all around the stand- Birchie studying faithfully- Webb recounting his good deeds to me- with the multiplication table in his hand- of which he knows twos- he plays so hard through the day- that a few moments quiet reflections- makes him sleepy- and with a good night Kiss he is gone- Little Rud is in the country- he is a great pet- but is very positive that he is too young to go to school almost every day some of my Aunts Uncles or Cousins come to see us- and to hear from you- so the time passes- the dear absent one- always in my thoughts-

Union Victory in Vermont- Oh how earnestly we pray for this coming election- The Color Sergant- [sic] loves the flag- My heart warmed towards him, I can imagine what his feeling must be towards it after having borne it in battle- do you know him or the guard personally- if you do I shall feel that the Flag is nearer to me- that I will not be forgotten- it is a very pleasant recollection to me- that our soldiers felt kindly towards me- away from you all- I think of every pleasant word and smile- But I commenced to write a short letter- I am afraid my miserable scrawls will not always interest you- Conference has just met in Chillicothe- I do not expect to know or see any of the meeting or members

Mother and I both received letters from Joe also yesterday- Webb wanted to bet which letter would have "most amusing- " decided on Uncle Joe's- but your account of all hands running to see prisoners changed him- I am very much obliged to you for your interest for Ike Cook- they found he was not enrolled- and so he has gone to Military School- but your kindness is felt as much as though it was needed- We are all well- little Sorrel is at Uncle Scott he says no trouble- and as yet not the slightest exhibition of viciousness- I was so glad you wrote to Uncle Scott- at the time you did- he was quite blue- but now is cheered and hopeful- Aunt Lu always wants her love mentioned- she is in town this week- indeed I might fill a sheet with love from all sides- Mother and boys love to PaPa and Uncle Joe-

Congratulations to Capt McKinley- Webb and his mother rejoice over every advancement of Gen Crook with true sincere joy. I heard lately from Uncle- and Mother Hayes- and Laura all well

Yours Affec
L W H
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Chillicothe. Sept 10th- 64

Dear Uncle-

I received your last letter- and was very glad to hear from you- I dont want you to feel obliged to answer every scrawl I send you- but let us hear from you as often as you can- I have received letters from R dated 30th 1st Sept- his letters to me are always cheerful and hopeful- they had just received a large mail- letters and papers all of July- from all of us- Last Monday the hopeful boys started to school and so far have done well- even Webb has received words of praise from his teacher-

Birchie is very constant and faithful- the boys give me no trouble- I have no news to write- but felt this morning that I would let you know how we were all getting on- Mothers health is very good- though her cough troubles her still My congratulations to Mrs Morehouse- and Mr- not to forget the groom- Birchie was much pleased- laughed heartily- and read it several times-

Remember me warmly to Mrs and Mr Vallette- I do hope he will be benefited [sic] by his trip- I was sorry after I sent my letter in which I mentioned the vinegar- fearing you were not well- but you must excuse me-

Boys and Mother wish to be remembered- My love to all friends

Yours Affc.
L W H
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Chillicothe. Sept 13th 64

My dearest R-

I was made so happy by receiving your letter of the 4th of Sept- I had seen in the paper that Crooks Division (and 23rd - 36th were specially mentioned had borne the worst- with the joy of hearing of your safety came the sorrow and sadness of others- Our Regt has suffered severely this Campaign and thinking of you all - those that are gone- the mourning weeping friends my heart is filled with sadness-

Capt Gillis is at rest- but the sad aching heart of his wife- we can none of us feel for her- the desolation and gloom has not entered our homes Where is Capt Austin left- are the wounded taken to Winchester- and poor Brigdon- Mortally wounded- I have often thought of him- he had such a cheerful happy countenance- and I remember the last time I saw him from the Steam Boat- as he was bearing the Brigade Colors-

You speak of anxiety for me- I am very well yet- thinking all the time of dearest ones absent but trusting and praying that they may still be saved- You have passed through many dangers- in the last three years- and my hopeful heart thinks of all and still feels it may be so again-

Dear little Rud was talking with Aunt Lucy when in the country about you- says "dont you wish papa would get a little wounded- then he would come home again- and we would keep him"- You are not forgotten by the boys- every pleasure they have brings papa to their thought

I wrote you Birch and Webb had started to school- they seem to enjoy it much- and I think will do well- they are all looking so well and hearty- Their little garden has been the source of a great deal of happiness- the flowers bloomed beautifully- tomatoes were delicious- and yesterday they pulled part of their pop corn- the prettiest looking corn I have seen- the sugar corn is just getting ready for eating- they have kept their garden free from weeds- and when the frost comes- I have promised a pair of chickens for their winter amusements- I wrote you that Isaac Cook- was back at School- Uncle William was in since I received your and Joe letter- and he wished me to thank you sincerely for your great kindness- they all feel it very much-

There is one if he ever returns from prison- that I want you for my sake whereever [sic] you may be- to do something for him- poor Willie McKell - we think from some things that he may be still at Danville-

Yesterday I thought I would not be able to write to you very soon- but this morning I find myself hobbleing [sic] around- and may be about till the last of the month- Good bye darling all join in a great deal of love to you-

Good Bye.,

Your Affec
L.W.H.

I received your letter with the State Receipt Say to Joe Mother is looking better than usual- she has written to him very lately but he may not have received it- all well-
Lu
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Chillicothe Sept 14th 64

My dear Brother

It has been some time since I wrote to you- and even then it is doubtful whether you receive all we do write- We are living very quietly and home like in this old home place- the Conference has just met here which enlivened the town some what- Yesterday the Ohio and Cincinnati Conferences met in Chillicothe- So making quite a large crowd- in the afternoon Bishop Simpson delivered an address upon the State of the Country- every body old and young Presbyterian or what not- declared it to be unequalled- Our Union loving people came away feeling all was not lost- Our country must and would be saved- Mother from being rather desponding now feels safe and hopeful- the sound Country loving talk of a good and great mind sway the people- I wish he would deliver his address generally-

Then in addition to the peace gathering of Ministers was a slightly beligerent [sic] one on Monday at Erskin Carson's office in which Carson and Gilmore Charley took part in fact were the actors- Carson had the best of it- until old man Gilmore struck him on the head with his cane- Carson was choking G pretty well- a little more choking or hitting was done and by that time the parties separated- Carson is very hot and impetuous- and I guess couldn't stand Gilmores Copperheadism when it came too close to him- Our side was nearer being victorious if it was a crippled soldier- Well that is passed Conference has adjourned- and my boys are pulling their pop corn I wish you could see the little rascals- Rud takes great delight in showing the distance your tent was from the river- "three jumps of a fat man like Rud"- Yesterday the three walked out to spend the day at Uncle Scotts- there was no school- they came back in the evening very happy and very tired- All the friends are well - poor Aunt Phebe can think only of Willie- to strangers she appears cheerful- but we can see the daily effects of her anxiety- we have got to thinking he must yet be in Danville- Sergeant Wm J.McKell Co D. 89th O.V.I. there would be no chance of your writing to him would there- You may not have received my letter in which I told you your box of papers went with Capt McKinleys to Gallipolis- Yesterday received a letter from Jim- he was well- wrote in good spirits- Mother says do write as often as you can- The elections have commenced right- Vermont and Maine for the Union- we will still hope for victory- Kate Stillwell has another daughter- Mother boys Aunts Uncles and Cousin join in love to you- Mother is looking better than when you saw her actually I think fattening though not corpulent - Remember me to my numerous friends

Yours Affc.
L.W.H.
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Chillicothe- Sept 21st 1864

My dearest R

Yesterday the news of the battle in the Shenandoah- was received- we are said to be victorious- but with what terrible loss we do not know- it will not do to think of what might have happened- but hope and pray- that sorrow and grief has not come to our hearts- All our thoughts are with you- and our brave suffering soldiers- How changed the Regt. must appear - Capt Austin's death- was very sad to me- you know I have a fine picture of him- it looked so beautiful and full of life- that as I sat and looked at it- I could not keep back the tears- and then all the changes the fearful loss of noble spirits- mourning wives and mothers came in my mind- and feeling that your dear life had been spared to me- through so many dangers- it seemed that I could not be thankful enough- Yesterday the little boys were made happy by a letter from Uncle Joe- dear boys they are a great comfort- they love to talk of papa and Uncle Joe- and indeed a great deal of our time is spent in that way- Birchie is very much in earnest at school- and was much amused with Uncle Joe's "feeling afraid lest Webb would study too hard- he is good at a joke- and Webb looked mischevious and shook his head- Little Rud has gone to Aunt Margret's- he will stay there until my troubles are over- I suppose I might say I am in a state of "expectancy" all the time- never did I so long to have any thing over with- but that is useless- do not feel uneasy about me- I am very well- never was in better health- although I am quite helpless about walking or moving around- but Uncle Scotts buggy is in every day- some of them are here each day to know how we are and whether I want to go any where- except for your absence dearest- I am surrounded by the kindest of friends- Mother keeps very well and we all strive to be cheerful- I had a letter from Uncle Birchard- he and Mrs Vallette were going to New York- if he returns well- and the weather is still pleasant- he will try and come to see me- I do not write quite as often to the friends just now- as my hip pains me a good deal when ever I write- Give my love and best regards to Dr and all friends- Mother and boys and Auntties and Cousins all send a great deal of love- I must close-

Good bye dearest-

Your Affec
L-

Received the check- and have got the Money-
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Chillicothe Oct 18th 64

My dearest R-

It seems a long while since I wrote you- but all the time I have been thinking of you- and longing so to see you-

Our boy is nearly three weeks old- I sometimes think you may not have heard of the darling's arrival- while I was confined to my bed my great happiness was your letters dated from the 26th of Sept to 2nd of Oct- each day I received a letter- short tis [sic] true- but containing so much in the least few lines- Our boy is a fine large child- weighed 10 lbs at his birth- no little stranger was ever so warmly welcomed by Uncles and Cousins We have given Uncle Scott the title of Grand father- not a day passes he does not call to see us- and always the first thing kisses his little General- he is called nothing else by the friends- Birch has taken him for his own in dear little Joe's place- the children all call him Joedie-[sic] and it comes very natural and sweet to me- But I must stop writing- I am looking so anxiously for a letter have had none more recent than date Oct 2nd

Mother is quite well- All join in love to you and Uncle Joe- Good bye my darling-

Your Affec.
L.W.H.
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Chillicothe Oct 29th 1864

My dearest R-

You know with what dread the news of battle is received- and then for days we heard nothing- except the loss of Officers is very great- All that Kept me from being in despair was your promise to me- that whatever happened I should hear it- if it was possible to do so- Your dispatch send [sic] by Capt Reed from Martinsburg went to Cincinnati- I did not get it till Saturday- but then it was received by thankful hearts- Uncle Scott spent a sleepless night- I received your letter written since the battle on Thursday- truly dearest you have had many wonderful escapes- how you received no serious injury I cannot imagine- As the fall months wear away I long for this Campaign to be over- it seems that you are almost ready to be with us- and yet what may happen- it requires some effort for me to look on the hopeful side- but yet we will hope for happy years- To day the little stranger is a month old- you want to know what he looks like- Uncle Scott is so wrapped up in admiration for the General as he calls him that he would give a good account- but I will try- he was quite large- but not being well- has not fattened any- to day he is so much better that I can see he is gaining flesh- his eyes are large dark blue- nose like Webb- an inclination upwards- but I have no doubt his nose will be like his Mothers- a mouth like Ruds- taken as one whole baby he looks well- and will be a handsome boy- the dear little fellow has suffered severely with Colic- but we think if well- he would be a sweet happy little one- the children have all called him Joe- and I find that name seems to bring our dear little one that is gone- back to me again- our dear little Joe seems to be with us again- but I have told the children we must try and call him baby- till we hear from papa- Birchie and Webb have gone to spend the day at Uncle Scott- their employment gathering Walnuts they are doing very well- Birchie is fond of studying and has too much pride to not know his lessons his teacher said she wished she had a few more pupils to behave as Birch does- he is a boy of such good principle- Little Webb actually has taken to study five days he was head of the Spelling class- I find him in the morning with his Reader in his hand waiting for me to hear him read before going to school- since baby has come- I find my hands full- with attending baby and hearing lessons- what this portion of the Hayes family would do without Grand ma I dont know- Rud is still visiting at Aunt Margrets- he has been home once to see the baby as it was a boy- he would like to see it- It is right sad that beautiful little girl- didnt come instead of a great boy- but be consoled tis [sic] all for the best- Have you heard that you are a Great Uncle- I suppose it is no news to you- Little Miss Lillie Mitchell- they were all well when I heard last-

Uncle Birchard with his usual Kindness has sent me apples- I often wonder whether he really can like me or only tolerates for your sake- any way he writes me very kind letters- Mrs Vallette met with a very serious accident- in crossing the rail road by some means her carriage was broken all to pieces and Dolly the horse killed- Uncle had written to Webb that Dolly had a fine colt which was for him- so he has been a good deal troubled about it since-

Aunt Phebe has heard that Willie is dead- though she still clings to a little hope- I had not seen her for a week after- she heard it- and she looked so changed weeks of sickness could have changed her no more- then the husband is no kind sympathizing friend but only finding fresh fault with the government-

Monday Morn

Mother went to church yesterday morning- and in the afternoon instead of finishing my letter- we both had our hands full- with Colic- and again this morning- so I must hurry in time for the office- Yes baby has the Colic worse than any other of the boys- but we still hope for better days

with him- I had so much to ask you- but I must close Where is Capt Bottsford- We are all well-

Aunt Lu is here- she says that if any thing happens to you send for me- that she can will take care of the little one- The friends all feared something had happened to you- and that you feared to let me know- but all their uneasiness they kept from me- All send love- Birch and Webb are writing to you- Love to Joe. What name do you propose for baby- if we do not call him Joe- -

I think brother Joe- feels that it would be leaning little Joe,y [sic] away from us-

Yours.
L.W.H.
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Chillicothe- Nov 1st 64

Dearest R-

Your dear boy Webb- has labored hard to print you a letter- All afternoon he was printing never discouraged but once- when he said I dont believe papa can read- I read it for him- and told him you would prize it from him- He tells you we are going to Uncle Scotts Saturday- that he and Birch were there last Saturday- that he is doing well at school- was head of Spelling class five days- We are all well having most delightful weather-

Just heard from Ruddy- he is well sends me word he is burning leaves- Birchie is also writing you a letter- it has not been handed to me for perusal yet- do let us hear from you as often as you can- it is such a comfort to me- Mrs Douglass and her little family are well- we see each other nearly every day-

I am so sorry hear that Capt Hastings wound is so serious- is his sister with him- Our poor dear baby has the Colic terribly- the boys are now home from school- and I have just got baby down- Mother had to go out- so I have been alone with him- I still hope he will get over it-

Remember me to all friends- What name do you propose for the boy- he will be a noble looking little fellow-

Your Own-
L.W.H.

M- stands for me- in Webb letter- Just received your letter of 25th so glad to hear from you Yesterday received Joes letter of 21st
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Chillicothe, Nov 15th 64

Dear Uncle

Your letters are always so welcome- that I try to keep you in my debt by promptly answering- but the small addition to our family- has proved himself so inconsiderate- and selfish- that he requires constant care- He has not been very well at any time and has suffered most terribly with what they call Colic- Mother insists with all his crying- that he is a good baby and whenever he is not suffering wants to sleep- so we jog on hoping from day to day that he will be better- but enough of the baby- Birchie is kept pretty busy at school- he studies well- and his teacher's say his example is good. - Webb has actually got stirred up- and studies his reading and spelling with great earnestness- although he understood his father- that he need not learn anything but Arithmetic- he likes figures- and is getting along nicely with the little aritmatic- [sic] Rud has left us- he has been nearly three months at Aunt Magaret Boggs- sent me word a few days ago- that he was not coming home till after winter- they all say he is one of the best children they ever knew- but then you know Uncle- he is away from his Mother and Grand mother- Birchie was writing to you last week- and one of his principal items was to thank you for the apples- they reached us safely- and we are enjoying them very much- Mother especially with the Pear- Mains- He is very willing and glad that Auntie Vallette should have Rock- but on Rock's account wants her to be careful of the Rail road- her escape must have been wonderful- was she going to town or coming home- I cannot imagine how with the Carriage torn to pieces poor Dolly killed- she escaped-

I am so glad to hear Mr V- health has improved- My best love to them- I am very much obliged to you and he about the vinegar- but if you have not sent it- do not send it this winter I did not need it this fall as the drought cut short the cucumbers- and tomatoes- and I was sick when the late cucumbers came on- but next year if I am alive and well- I shall be very glad to have it- I do not want the interest and will be glad if you will get Bonds- I would like to have a

Fifty or One Hundred dollar- Bond for the three boys- as I have been Birchie banker for near eleven years- Webb and Ruds also- The beginning of Ruds fortune was ten dollars which he found- as they never buy candy- their money is deposited with me- if it would be no trouble I would like it fixed that way- My last letter from R was dated the 2nd this fall has been one of the most anxious periods of my life- the suspense after a battle- was terrible- and then the feeling that I have constantly strived to have- that R's life would be spared- would almost frighten me- as I would think why should his life be any more precious than thousands of others- but his many and narrow escapes- do seem dear Uncle that he is specially cared for- But I will weary you- Next summer with all the little chicks I hope to visit Spiegel Grove-

My kindest regards to Mr Phelps and family- Remember me to the friends-

Yours Affec-
L.W.H.

There I have forgotten Webb and his colt- he was quite troubled when he heard its mother was dead-
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Chillicothe. Nov 23rd 64

My dearest R-

We are all well- baby getting better- and beginning to grow- We all love the dear little fellow- with all his trouble and crying- Birchie and Webb are at school- and yesterday I sent an invitation for Master Rud to visit his Mother and Grand Mother the little rascal sent me word he was going to stay six years- that he had helped sow turnips pull cabbage and pick apples- and now he was going to stay and help eat them- Webb expects a letter every day- he is applying himself closely to his studies- in anticipation of your visit- every night they talk of the stories papa and Uncle Joe will tell them- and discuss your merits as to story telling-

Birchie while being very fond of his books- is just as fond of play and he wants the hardest kind- I notice when he has been running much that his hearing is worse- I wish you would ask him to be careful and not run and play too hard this cold weather- A letter from Jim all the friends in Cin- are all well- he says he has a nice room and will be happy to have visit from you-

Last night was terrible cold- we all thought of the soldiers- as the cold severe weather comes on- we think of you with sadder hearts-

Dearest you have not proposed any name for the little General- but I think of calling him for one of my ancestor Capt Bilious Cook- you remember his grave or rather his tombstone-

Good bye dearest- remember me to my friends- Love to Joe-

Yours Affec-
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Chillicothe- Dec 8th 64

My dearest-

With out intending I have neglected writing to you for a week- but you know you are not forgotten- or less frequently in our thoughts- Every day I hope to hear you are in Winter Quarters and that soon we shall see you-

Our little family are all with me- and I often feel that one is absent more vividly than when the darling was taken- Our boy for he has no name- is getting much better- beginning to grow a little- and notices- especially Uncle Scott- till we really think he knows him- we all love him dearly- and his sufferings were keenly felt by us- Birch and Webb are at school- doing well- I am astonished with Webb's earnestness and perseverance in studying- this morning he was reading his lessons over and over- do write to them soon- a letter is daily expected- Rud has come home- and he is equal to three or four boys- a great big hearty loving fellow- hanging around his Grand Mother - telling her a dozen times a day how much he loves her- This is a beautiful day sun bright- air cold and bracing- did Joe receive his Valise- or rather yours- had a long letter from Laura- very sweet and pleasant for me to receive. the little Lillie is a good baby- that is to my mind a wonderful happiness- Uncle Scott and the Auntties [sic] send love and want to see you very much- whether your own merits- or the fact of being my husband- has placed you so high in the estimation of my side of the house- I will let you answer- "suffice it to say"- you are loved dearly by all- Rud says Mother sends a Kiss- as grand ma was sending love- Remember me to all friends- Mrs Douglas and I meet nearly every day- we both want letters- Good bye my dearest

Your Affc.
L.W.H.
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Chillicothe. Dec 21st 64

Dearest R-

I shall be able to write but a few lines- our dear little George C can manage to occupy more time than is allowable for so young a child- You say I do not mention about the name- Now I will explain- You know what my feeling about the Gen has always been- and yet I could not propose the name for fear a smile might cross your face- and you try to ease me off in as quiet a way as possible- so now dearest nothing would give me more pleasure- and even now as I write- I think perhaps you are seeing how far you can draw your simple little wife-

We are all well- the boys very happy over their Christmas- their kind Uncle Birchard remembered them- sent $10 dollars to me for them- I think they felt your and Joe absence very much- Baby does not get over his Colic- poor child when ever he does get over it- he will be the merriest little fellow and I think handsome- but that is a Mother's partiality-

How glad I shall be to see you with the old star on your shoulder even though it is dimmed I look to see the public announcement- and have kept my news to myself- proud yes dearest such a feeling of love and happiness pervades my whole feeling when I think of you that my letters are tame- We hope so soon to see you- I must close and yet I have not written any thing I wanted to say-

Good bye darling my love to brother Joe- Remember me to all friends- All send love-

Yours Affec.
L.W.H.

Mrs Douglass and family are enjoying the Mumps- now recovering-
L.W.H.

Glad to hear Joe was pleased with the contents of his Valise-
Lu
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