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MANVILLE MOORE POST NO. 525
FREMONT, OHIO
GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC

Manville Moore 8th Ohio Voluntee Infantry

Manville Moore
8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry

PERSONAL WAR SKETCHES

On June 22, 1885, Post No. 525, Department of the Ohio, G. A. R. was organized at Fremont, Ohio. Veterans unanimously adopted the name Manville Moore for their post. Moore was born in Sandusky County, Ohio and enlisted in April 1861, as a corporal in Company G of the 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. After three-months service, he re-enlisted and served with his comrades, chiefly in Western Virginia. He fought in the battles of Winchester, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. He was mortally wounded July 3, 1863 at Gettysburg; he was taken to a hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, where he died soon after. His remains were brought home by his father. He was laid to rest in Fremont's Oakwood Cemetery. He was 25 years old.

[The following sketches were transcribed with minimal editing from the Manville Moore Post's volume of "Personal War Sketches," dated 1891. The post records are part of Local History Collection 220]

Adams, William p.13

Albritton, Rev. Josiah. L p.14

Was born the 13th day of September, A.D. 18___ in _________, County of Graves, State of Kentucky. He first entered military service June 12, 1864, at Paducah, Ky., as a private in Co. C. 53rd O.V.I. He was discharged Dec. 20th, 1864, by reason of expiration of term of service, six mouths. He re-enlisted and in February following he was promoted to the office of Hospital Steward. The first battle in which he was engaged was with some guerrillas in Henry Co, Ky. He was never wounded, but was sick with typhoid fever, and was confined in a hospital at Paducah, Ky.

He considers the most important event in his service, the search for the guerrilla Chief Col. Jesse. Down the Kentucky River, his military experiences were mainly in the vicinity of Frankfort and Bowling Green, Ky. The names of some of his intimates comrades were: Ben Stewart, Ben Rhoads, D.S. More, Capt. J.W. Swinker, LT. W.A. Bloodworth, Chas William.

He was finally discharged in Sept. 1865, by reason of the close of the war.

Transferred to Post Toledo, Ohio Feb. 7, 1898.

Barringer, John p.15

Was born 17th day of February, A.D. 1841 in __________, County of Marion, State of Ohio. He first entered military service Oct. 28th 1861, in Marion, Ohio as a private in Co. B. 64th Regiment, O.V.I. He was discharged in July, 1862, at Louisville, Ky., on account of disability from lung trouble caused by measles. He re-enlisted in April, 1863, in Co. B., 136th Regiment, O.V.I. at Marion, Ohio. He was sick for a time, and was confined in a hospital at Nashville, Tenn., and at Louisville, Ky., Barracks. While in the Hundred Day service he did duty in Heavy Artillery practice, or drills, five hours a day, and two hours in Infantry Drill, and at Firing at targets two day in the week while at Fort Ellsworth, and while at Fort Lyon, eleven miles below Washington, D.C.

He deems the much important event in his service the battle of Stone River.

Intimates: Samuel Bierbauer, Gust Keltner, Dave Scott, Henry Hildebrand, Samuel Harberson, and Thomas Ward.

He was finally discharged June 27th, 1862 by reason of disability.

Beery, John V. p.16

Was born the 20th day of December, A.D. 1834 in ________, County of Wood, State of Ohio. He first entered military service July 17th 1862, at Fremont, Ohio, as Capt. of Co. A. 111th Regt. O.V.I. He never took part in a regular battle; but had charge of the skirmish line when it was attacked by the Rebel forces at Frankfort, Ky. When detailed as Officer of the Day at Bowling Green, Ky., and while in the line of duty, making his rounds about one o’clock at night, he was accidentally thrown from his horse and ruptured. He never missed a day off duty from the time he entered service until he was disabled; and then did not resign until the regimental and Brigade Surgeons urged him to do so, on the ground that it would be impossible for him to stand the marches and hardships of army life while so disabled.

He considers that the most important event in his service was the misfortune of becoming disabled so soon, and of being obliged to part from his comrades.

He was discharged at Bowling Green, Ky., by reason of a wound.

Intimate comrades: Capt. J.H. McCord, Capt. J.W. Smith, Chas Hampshire, Samuel Jackson, Joseph Schwartz, and James L. Tindall.

Barnes, Charles E. p. 17

Benner, Louis J. p. 18

Blosier, Henry p.19

Was born the 8th day of August, A.D. 1834, in Buffalo, County of Erie, State of New York. He first entered military service Aug. 22, 1862, at Sandusky, Ohio, as a private in Co. G. 123d Regt. O.V.I., under Col. Wm. T. Wilson. First battle was at Morefield West Va., next at Winchester, June 13, 14, 15; and later at New Market, Piedmont, Lynchburg, Snicker’s Ferry, Opequan, Fisher’s Hill, Cedar Crk., Hatcher’s Run, High Bridge, and many skirmishes at other places. He was taken prisoner at Winchester, June 15th 1863, and was imprisoned at Belle Isle and at Libby. He was exchanged while at Libby prison, sometime in July, 1863.

He considers that the most important event for him was his getting out of prison alive. His friend Timanus had stolen some provisions and shared them with him, which gave him strength to get out promptly when the order came for an exchange of prisoners. They went from Libby to Annapolis, Md., in July, 1864 and rejoined their regiment under Col. Horace Kellogg of Norwalk, Ohio.

He continued in the service till the close of war, and was discharged June 12, 1865 at Camp Chase Columbus, O., Exp. Serv. He contracted disabilities in the service from which he still suffers.

Names of some intimate comrades: Sergt. Wesley B. Jennings, James Cross, Jay Bogart, Richard H. Timanus, Joseph Groff, Henry Baruard, Peter Sherer.

Boor, Samuel p. 20

Was born the 25th day of August, A.D. 1835, near Bedford Springs, County of Bedford, State of Pennsylvania. He first entered military service, Sept. 21st 1860, at Helena, Ohio, as a private in Co. J. 72d Regiment, Capt. Fickes. He was promoted during service to Corporal and 2d Sergeant. He was on detached duty three months before his first discharge and six months afterward; working on forts at Vicksburg and building R.R. bridges. He was first discharged in winter of 1863-4, for purpose of re-enlistment as veteran, for 3 years, or during the course of the war. The first battle in which he was engaged was at Shiloh, or Pittsburgh Landing, Tenn. Later ones at Corinth, Jackson, Vicksburg, Jackson, Tupelo, Monterey, Miss., Nashville, Spanish Fort, and skirmishes at Black River and Tallahassee. He was never taken prisoner. He was wounded at the battle of Shiloh, but was never in hospital.

The names of some of his intimate comrades: Capt. Fairbanks, Abe Alrich, Edwin Kemmerling, Chad Robinson, John Hails, John Kemmerling, Marc Bates.

He considers the Battle of Pittsburgh Landing the most important event in his service.

Bolen, Louis p. 21

Was born the 22d day of October, A.D. 1830 in _______, County of Perry, State of Ohio. He first entered military service in the summer of 1863, as a private in Co. A. 50th Regiment Ohio Home Guards and served in the Fall on guard duty at Sandusky, Ohio, near which, on Johnson’s Island, rebel officers were confined as prisoners of war. He was next entered service May 2, 1864, at Fremont, Ohio, in the same Co. and Regt. which was mustered into U.S. Service at Cleveland, O. and became the 169th Regt. O.V.I. Here he was promoted to the rank of Corporal.

He was finally discharged Sept. 4, 1864, at Cleveland, O, by reason of expiration of term of service.

The names of some of his intimate comrades: Darwin Ulark, Henry Stacy, Selah Anderson, Harvey Arlin, Peter Kessler, Russell Smith and Henry Cochran.

He considers the most important event in his service the drill on light artillery at Fort Ethan Allen, Va.

He was mustered into Manville Moore Post in 1891 and has held and honorable membership.

Bolton, Austin Q. p. 22

Was born the 14th day of August, A.D. 1841 in ________, County of Genesee, State of Michigan. He first entered military service Aug. 16, 1861, at Fremont, Ohio, as private in Co. F, 49th Regt. O.V.I. He served for some time as Acting Hospital Steward. He was discharged Dec. 31, 1863, at Strawberry Plains, Eastern Tenn., (Exp. Serv.) He re-enlisted Jan. 1, 1864 in the same Company and Regiment and on May 10, 1864, was transferred to duty in Field Hospital. First Battle – Shiloh – later ones: Dog Walk and Missionary Ridge. Served as Hosp. Steward at Nashville and on Atlanta campaign, and at Marietta, Ga. He was never wounded, but was sick, and confined in Cumberland Hospital, and at Murfreesboro Tenn. he was taken prisoner twice in one day, but escaped. At Stone River he was rescued by Union Cavalry.

The most important event in his service – the storming of Missionary Ridge.

Some of his intimate comrades: Josiah R. Rollins, J.Q. Russell, Levi Laughlin, Ross Wilson, John W. Ash, John Parish, and John Durfee.

He was finally discharged Nov 30, 1865, at Victoria, Texas, by reason of close of the war.

Bowles, Hanson R. p.23

Was born the 25th day of December, A.D. 1836 in Sandusky Tp., County of Sandusky, State of Ohio. He first entered military service in the Fall of 1863 at Fremont, Ohio as 1st Lieut., of Co. I. 50th Regt. Ohio Home Guards and was on duty several weeks at Sandusky, O., to aid in guarding Johnson’s Island, where Rebel officers were confined as prisoners of war. On May 2, 1864, he again entered active service and soon after was mustered into the U.S. Service at Cleveland, Ohio as Captain of Co. K., 169th O.V.I. and served 125 days at Fort Ethan Allen, Va., under Col. Nathaniel E. Haynes. While in the line of duty, he had one of his knees fractured by accident, and received hospital treatment from the Regimental Surgeon, Dr. P Beaugrand.

His company was at one time selected by lot and detailed to go out from the Fort about five miles on the Leesburg Pike, to guard the road, before Gen. Early attempted his raid on Washington D.C., which he considers one of the most important events in his personal experience.

He took much interest in and became expert at Artillery Target Practice.

Intimate comrades: William Deemer, M.W. Seibert, Philip A. Overmyer, A.F. Wolf, Josiah Wolfe, and Will Benner.

He was discharged Sept. 4, 1864, at Cleveland, Ohio by expiration of term of service.

Bristol, E.A. p. 24

Was born the 17th day of August, A.D. 1846 in Ravenna, County of Portage, State of Ohio. He enlisted in the U.S. Naval Service Aug. 31st 1864, at Cincinnati, Ohio, as a Landsman, and service on the Gunboats Fort Hindmand and General Bragg. In Sept. 1864, while serving on board the Gunboat Hindman, he was promoted to the position of Paymaster’s Clerk. There was guerrilla warfare along the Mississippi and Red rivers, and he assisted in convoying transports and engaged in frequent scouting expeditions on shore, through the jungles and swamps of Louisiana, under a torrid sun. The service was extremely severe and undermined his constitution so that he never fully recovered from it.

He considers the Banks Expedition up the Red River, La., in the early Spring of 1865, and the capture of Alexandria, as the most hazardous and exacting events during his term of service.

He was discharged at Cairo, Ill., July 5th 1865, by reason of close of the war.

His intimate ship-mates were: T.J. Bradbury, Andrew Strain and L.P. Riley.

Brinkerhoff, D.H. p. 25

Was born the Fifth day of December, A.D. 1822, in Awasco, County of Cayuga, State of New York. He entered military service August 15th 1862, as Asst. Surgeon in the 103rd Regiment, O.V.I. and was promoted to the rank of surgeon major in 1864. He served on the staff of Gen Schofield from the time of the capture of Atlanta until the close of the Rebellion.

During the first year of service he was with his regiment. During the second year he was chief medical officer of the 2d Brigade, Third Division, 23d Army Corps. In 1864 he was appointed senior surgeon with rank of Major. After the capture of Atlanta he was appointed and served on the staff of Maj. Gen. Schofield with the rank of Assistant Medical Director of the 23d Army Corps. He was mustered out of service at Raleigh, N.C. in June, 1865, with the highest testimonials of efficiency from the Medical Department of the Army and from Gen. Schofield.

Burgner, Jacob p. 26

Was born on the Fifth day of November, A.D. 1833, in Thompson Tp., County of Seneca, State of Ohio. He first entered military service at Fremont, Ohio, May 2d 1864 in Co. K. 50th Regt. Ohio Home Guards, which became after consolidation Co. H. 169th Regt. O.V.I. at Camp Cleveland, Ohio. He served as company clerk during the whole time of his enlistment except when sick with malarial fever, at Fort Ethan Allen, Virginia. He received hospital treatment from Dr. P. Beaugrand in Company H Barracks.

The names of some of his intimate comrades are W.J. Havens, Solomon Warner, Capt. J. D. Thomas, William Deemer and Eli Maurer.

He deems the most important event in his service doing guard duty when Gen Early made his raid on Washington D.C.

He was honorably discharged Sept 4, 1864.

He became a charter member of Manville Moose Post 525. G.A.R. June 22d 1885. Took transfer to Henry Lincoln Post, Oberlin, O. where he served as Historian. Returned to Moore Post in 1894, and served as Adjutant and Assistant Quarter Master and later as Historian.

Cavalier, Peter p. 27

Was born on the 6th day of February, A.D. 1841 in ___________, County of _________, State of Ohio. He first entered military service Sept. 23, 1864, at Sandusky City, Ohio, as a private in Co. E. 64th Regt. O.V.I. and went with his regiment to the front. He was not in any battle, but was wounded in a railroad wreck which occurred between Huntsville and Decatur, Ala., by which he was disabled in his right hip and left elbow. He lay in hospital at Chattanooga about two months and later in a field hospital at Nashville about two weeks previous to his discharge. He was in service ten months.

He considers the most important event in his service was that of getting home alive.

He was discharged by reason of expiration of term of service, June 16, 1865, General Order, War Dept.

The names of his intimate comrades are David Dillon, Wm. Dillon, Noah Pate, John Mackey, John McCritchey and Wm. Brumbaugh.

Chapman, Edwin F. p. 28

Cleghorn, George p.29

Coleman, John p.30

Was born the 8th day of April, A.D. 1847 in Woodville Tp., County of Sandusky, State of Ohio. He first entered military service Sept. 22, 1864 at Toledo, Ohio, as a private in Co. A. 182d Regiment, O.V.I., being but 17 years of age. He was not in any battle, but worked on fatigue duty at the building of Fort Butler. He also served his turns at guard, picket and camp duty. He was sick in Hospital at Nashville, Tennessee, several months, then transferred to Louisville, Kentucky on a Hospital boat, then to the Zolicoffer House, then back to Nashville, Tenn., for a while, after which he returned to his regiment and resumed duty.

Some of his comrades were Dr. Willette, Capt. Burke, Col. Butler, Lieutenant Libby, John W. Backhurst.

He was discharged July 7th 1865, by reason of the close of the war having served ten months.

Cramer, Conrad p. 31

Crum, George W. p. 32

Culbert, Elijah p.33

Was born the 9th day of August, A.D. 1821, in Belfast, County of Antrim, Ireland. He first entered military service Sept. 1, 1863, as a private in Co. J. 12th Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. The first battle in which he was engaged was at Mt. Sterling, Ky., later ones at Cynthiana Ky., and at Saltville, Va., where he was captured Oct. 2, 1864, by the forces of Rebel Gen. Breckenridge. He was confined in rebel prisons a Lynchburg, Libby and Pemberton. He was transferred from Lynchburg prison to Libby Oct. 10, 1864, and from Libby to Pemberton from which place he was paroled Feb, 5, 1865, and returned to Annapolis, Md. Feb 7th 1865. He stopped at Annapolis, Md. 16 days and then went to Camp Chase, Columbus, Ohio where he was discharged June 10th 1865, by reason of Order 77 War Dept.

He deems the battle of Saltville and the most important during his service.

The names of his intimate comrades: James Gilmore, Theodore Edward, Lewis Michaels, Geo. W. Aunes, and George Bartlett.

Davis, David p. 34

Was born the 11th day of February, A.D. 1845 in Fremont, County of Sandusky, State of Ohio. He enlisted for military service in the summer of 1863 at Fremont, Ohio, as a private in Co. K. 50th Regiment, Ohio Home Guards, attended military drills at Toledo, Ohio, in September, and served on Guard Duty at Sandusky, Ohio, in November, 1863. On the 2d of May, 1864, he re-entered active service and went with his company to Camp Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio, where they entered the U.S. service as a part of the 169th Regiment, O.N.G.I., and were sent to relieve the 212th Pa. Regt., and do guard duty 100 days at Fort Ethan Allen, Va.

He considers the most important event in his service the defeat of Rebel Gen. Early in his raid on Washington City.

The names of intimate comrades: Amos Overmyer, Wm. Boyer, Michael Overmyer, E.S. Bowersox, Philip A. Overmyer, Jonathan Loveberry, Capt. H.R. Bowlus.

He was discharged Sept. 4 by reason of expiration of term of service. He had been drafted for three years in 1862, and furnished Substitute, Richard Bates, 10th Regt. O.V.C.

Deemer, William p. 35

Was born the 12th day of September, A.D. 1828 in Williams Tp., County of Northampton, State of Pennsylvania. He first enlisted for Military service July 31st 1863, at Fremont, Ohio as a private in Co. K. 50th Regt. Ohio Home Guards, attended military drills at Toledo, O., in Sept. 1863, and served several weeks in October and November at Sandusky, Ohio, in helping guard Johnson’s Island, where rebel officers were held as prisoners of war. On May 2d 1864, he went with his command to Cleveland, Ohio, where, on May 15th, he was mustered into the U.S. Service as a private in Co. K. 169th Regiment, O.N.G.I. (later O.V.I.) He held the office of clerk of Co. K., for Capt. H. R. Bowlus, and rendered good service at Fort Ethan Allen, Virginia. He was sick for a time, but not confined in hospital, yet received hospital treatment from Dr. P. Beaugrand. He also cared for his brother, Edward Deemer, when he was sick.

The most important event in his service, was, guarding the office of Co. K. on the night of the defeat of Early’s attack on Defenses of Washington D.C.

Some of his intimate comrades: Capt. H.R. Bowlus, Jonathan Loveberry, E.S. Bowersox, T.F. Siegfried, Jacob Burgnur.

He was discharged Sept. 4, 1864, at Cleveland, Ohio, by reason of exp. term of service.

Deemer, Edward p. 36

Was born the 25th day of March, A.D. 1837 in Easton, County of Northampton, State of Pennsylvania. He first entered military service May 9th 1864, as a private in Co. K. 169th Regiment, O.V.I. (first the 50th Regiment, Ohio Home Guards. Organized at Fremont, Ohio, and sworn into service at Camp Cleveland, O.) and did guard and picket duty at Fort Ethan Allen, Va. He was sick, and was confined in a hospital about six weeks.

He regards as the most important event in his service, doing guard and picket duty at the time when Rebel General Early attempted to capture Washington City.

The names of some of his intimate comrades: A.J. Wolf, James Benner, Monroe Scibert, Capt. Chas Thompson, Daniel Stults, Capt. H.R. Bowlus, Jonathan Loveberry, W.J. Havens.

He was discharged Sept. 4, 1864, by reason of expiration of term of service.

Deffenbaugh, Washington p. 37

Was born the 16th day of August, A.D. 1839 in Zanesville, County of Muskingum, State of Ohio. He first enlisted for military service at Zanesville, O., August 30, 1864, as landsman, to serve in the U.S. Navy. In company with 36 other comrades from the same place he went to Evansville, Ind., where they were stationed two months to guard about 200 conscripts or drafted men from the Eastern States. After this they were ordered on board a Dispatch Steamer, “Brilliant,” No. 18., one of the fastest of the 18 boats that constituted the Ohio Squadron. They plied up and down the Mississippi, Cumberland and Tennessee rivers, carrying dispatches, convoying troops and guarding supplies. Their Headquarters were at Smithland, at the mouth of the Cumberland River.

During the battle of Nashville they convoyed and returned, for a distance of about 20 miles, a regiment of Gen. A.J. Smith’s Cavalry. Their engines, meanwhile were protected by bales of cotton, piled on the boat when ice was frozen on them. Comrade Deffenbaugh regards this as the most important event in his service.

He was never wounded, nor taken prisoner nor confined in a hospital.

The names of some of his intimate comrades are ____ Boring, (Steward of the boat “Brilliant”, Edward Russell, ____ McCutchen, Bob Evans, ____ Fortune, ____ Cozier. Comrade Deffenbaugh was honorably discharged at Moundville, near St. Louis, Mo., June 13, 1865, as a seaman, by reason of the close of the war.

Deffenbaugh, Wm. H. p. 38

Doll, Samuel p. 39

Was born the 3d of March, A.D. 1835 in Jackson Tp., County of Sandusky, State of Ohio. He first entered military service in the fall of 1863, in Co. B. 50th Regt. Ohio National Guards and served several weeks in helping guard Johnson’s Island where rebel officers were confined as prisoners of war. He next volunteered and served as a corporal in Co. H. 169th Regiment, O.V.I. organized at Camp Cleveland, Ohio, which did guard and fatigue duty at Fort Ethan Allen, Va. about 120 days. He was promoted to the rank of Sergeant. He was sick with camp fever and chronic diarrhea at the fort several weeks, after which he was confined in the General Hospital at Washington D.C. until the regiment returned to Cleveland to be mustered out.

He considers the most important event in his service doing picket duty several miles out from the fort at the time of Gen. Early’s raid on Washington D.C.

He was discharged Sept. 4, 1864, by expiration of term of service.

Among his intimate comrades were: W.J. Havens, Solomon Warner, Valentine Shale, Peter Keenan, Cessna Boor and J. Burgner.

Down, Isaac p. 40

Dow, Louis F. p. 41

Dunning, Edwin R. p. 42

Edwards, Theodore F. p. 43

Was born the 10th of October, A.D. 1844, in Ballville Tp., County of Sandusky, State of Ohio. He enlisted in military service as a member of Co. I. 12th Ohio Volunteer Calvary, October 12, 1863.

Elder p. 44

Ernst, George W. p. 45

Was born the 28th day of September, A.D. 1839, in Mobile, County of ____, State of Alabama. He first entered military service March 29th 1862, at Indianapolis, Ind., as a Private in Co. A. 26th Regiment, Indiana V. I. The first battle in which he was engaged was at Prairie Grove, Ark., Dec. 7, 1863. Later engagements ___ at Springfield, Missouri, Jan. 7+8, 1863; the Vicksburg Campaign, June and July 1863, and a number of skirmishes elsewhere. He was never wounded or confined in a hospital, but was laid up with rheumatism about six weeks at St. Louis, Mo., while on detached service.

He considers the most important event in his service _____.

The names of some of his intimate comrades are: Granvill G. Long, H.B. Scott, Charles Carter, Darius Troutman, Leander Troutman, and Archibald McDonald.

He was discharged Apr. 13, 1865 by reason of expiration of term of enlistment.

Esch, Joseph p. 46

Was born the 11th of January, A.D. 1837, in ­­­____, County of Northampton, State of Pennsylvania. He first entered military service Aug. 30th 1864, at Brownsville, Pa., as a private in the 212th Pa. V. I.; and served later in the 6th Regiment Heavy Artillery, in which he was detailed as a carpenter. He was in the service about ten months. He first went on duty at Fort Ethan Allen, Va., and a few weeks later was taken out to work on the Osage & Alexandria Railroad, about six weeks, when he returned to camp, sick with malaria fever.

He deems the most important event in his service his escape from being shot by mistake while out on picket duty.

The names of his intimate comrades are: Frank Herlinger, John Esch, Andrew Paul, Benj. F. Ackerman, Uriah Youngkin, Daniel Golden, Albert Golden, Michael Overdorff. He was discharged at Camp Copeland, near Pittsburg, June 14, 1865, by reason of the close of the war. This camp, 11 miles East of Pittsburg, Pa., is near the place of Braddock’s defeat, in a deep ravine, in 1755.

Fabing, Joseph p. 47

Was born the 18th day of April, A.D. 1842, in Syracuse, County of Onondaga, State of New York. He first entered military service August 5th 1862, at Syracuse, N.Y. as a private in Co. B. 122nd N.Y. Infantry. Though in some hard battles, he was never seriously wounded, nor taken prisoner, nor confined in a hospital. The first battle in which he was engaged was Antietam; then followed those of Fredericksburg, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Coal Harbor, Defenses of Washington, Cedar Creek, Petersburg, Mine Run and Rappahannock Station. While doing guard duty he was detailed to take charge of a wagon train, as the Wagon Master was gone, first as assistant, and later as Head Wagon Master of a supply train, serving as Orderly for the Quarter Master, and when in that capacity it was his rare fortune to get close enough to the lines to witness the surrender of Gen. Robert E. Lee, at Appomattox. General Lee and Staff, consisting of seven or eight men, came out of the woods on horseback, then dismounted, (an orderly taking back their horses,) after which they fell into line, took out their swords and held them by the blade, hilt downward, and marched in line until they got to within a few rods of where Gen. Grant and staff and Gen. Wright, of the 6th Army Corps and staff, were standing, when the Confederates put their sword hilts on the ground and came to a parade rest. Then Gen. Robert E. Lee, Commander in Chief of the Confederate Forces, stepped to the front, seven or eight paces, and General Wright stepped forward and met him. Then Gen. Lee presented his sword to Gen. Wright, as a token of surrender, and Gen. Wright handed it to General Grant, as soon as this was done Grant stepped up to Lee and they shook hands. All the other officers did likewise, but retained their sabers. Orderlies brought horses of both parties and soon all galloped away, while Union soldiers cheered, fired salutes and threw up hats, caps, guns, haversacks, etc. in wild excitement. Rebels stacked arms and retired.

Comrade Fabing was discharged June 22nd, 1865, at Washington, D.C. He had served about 3 months on Battery C second U.S. Light Artillery; in all 2 yrs and 10 mos. Intimate comrades: Marshal Smith, Jerome Howe, Wm. Kennett, Geo. Maxwell, Wm. Paul, Eli Gleason.

Fairbank, Josiah p. 48

Was born the 30th day of December, A.D. 1824, in Tyringham, County of Berkshire, State of Massachusetts. He first entered military service October 20th 1861, at Fremont, Ohio, as a private in Co. I., 72d Regiment, O.V.I. He was promoted to 2d Sergeant in Jan. 1862, 1st Sergeant in Sept. 1862, 2d Lieut. Apr. 8, 1864, 1st Lieut. in Nov. 1864, and Captain in May, 1865. He was first discharged at Columbus, Ohio, in winter of 1863-4, for the purpose of re-enlistment as veteran, which he did.

The first battle in which he was engaged was Shiloh; later ones, Jackson, the Siege of Vicksburg, 2nd Jackson, Siege of Corinth, and Guntown. He was sick and confined in hospital at Monterey, Miss., June 4, 1863, 10 ds, Louisville, Ky., 10 ds, Cincinnati, O., 10 ds, then got a furlough home, and re-joined his regiment at Memphis, Tenn., Aug 2nd 1863. In October, 1863, he was sent on a recruiting service, and returned to his regiment in January, 1864.

He was twice taken prisoner. The first time he made his escape soon after capture. The second time he was taken on a retreat, near Ripley, Miss., June 12th, 1864, by Gen. Forrest’s command, and taken to Guntown, then to Mobile, then Raleigh, N.C., then to Goldsboro, N.C., where he was paroled, March 1, 1865, and exchanged, ___.

After a furlough home he again returned to his regiment and served until Sept. 10th, 1865, when he was honorably discharged with his regiment, at Columbus, Ohio, by reason of the close of the war.

The names of some of his intimate comrades: Samuel Boor, John J. Nuhfer, James Donnels, Wm. Donnels, Samuel Roush, Chauncey Walters.

He considers the battle of Pittsburg Landing as the most important event in his service.

Fangboner, John p. 49

Fitch, John G. p. 50

Freeman, C.A. p. 51

Was born the 7th day of February, A.D. 1844, in Fremont, County of Sandusky, State of Ohio. He first enlisted for military service July 31st 1863, at Fremont, Ohio, as a private in Co. F. 50th Regiment Ohio Home Guards. He served on guard duty in the Fall of 1863, at Sandusky, Ohio, near Johnson’s Island, where rebel officers were held as prisoners of war. On May 2, 1864 he entered active service, at Fremont, Ohio, and went with his company to Cleveland, Ohio, where they entered the U.S. Service, in the 169th Regiment, O.V.I., which served on guard duty at Fort Ethan Allen, Va., in the summer of 1864.

He considers the most important event in his service, doing guard duty at Fort Marcy, Va., at the time of Gen. Early’s Raid on Washington, D.C.

The names of some of his intimate comrades: S.E. Anderson, David Leppelman, H. Stacy, T.F. Siegfried, Chas. Thompson, Harvey H. Arlin.

He was discharged at Cleveland, Ohio, Sept. 4, 1864, by reason of expiration of term of service.

French, Orastus S. p. 52

Was born the ____ day of ____, A.D. 18__ in ____, County of _____, State of ______. He was ordered from Cleveland, Ohio, to the New York Navy Yard, where he enlisted in Dec. 1863. He was appointed 2d Assistant Engineer, U.S.N., Jan. 8, 1864, and ordered to report to Rear Admiral Gregory for duty on board U.S. Steamer “Admiral,” of the West Gulf Squadron. This vessel was re-named “The Fort Morgan,” after the Mobile fight. Comrade French was detached from the Steamer Fort Morgan, March 7, 1865, and ordered to report to Rear Admiral Stringham, at Boston Navy Yard, for duty on board U.S. Steamer “Yucca,” East Gulf Squadron. He was in charge of the Engineers Dept. on this vessel until the close of the war. He was detached from the Steamer Yucca, Feb. 20, 1866, and received his final discharge April 20, 1866, with the thanks of the Department.

Gessner, Dr. Gustavus A. p. 53

Was born the 11th day of March, A.D. 1844, in Fremont, County of Sandusky, State of Ohio. He first entered military service Apr. 23, 1861 at Fostoria, Ohio, as Private in Co. H. 21st Regt. O.V.I. He afterwards held the offices of Sergt. and Hosp. Steward and was Brevetted 2d Lieut. The dates of his promotion were: Jan. 10, 1862 and June 20, 1863. His rank at close of war was that of Hospital Steward. The first battle in which he was engaged was at Scarey Crk. W.Va., in July, 1861. He was discharged Aug. 25th 1861, by reason of expiration of term of service. He re-enlisted at Fremont, Ohio, Dec 9, 1861, and in the 72d O.V.I. and veteranized at Germantown Tenn, Dec. 22, 1865. He was at the Battle of Shiloh April 1862 and also at Guntown. He was wounded at the battle of Shiloh and was in the General Hospital for a time, at Covington, Ky., also on the Hospital Boat “Telegraph No. 4.” He had been taken prisoner at Shiloh, but escaped. He was captured at Guntown, June 11th 1864, by Rebel General N.B. Forest. He was confined in Andersonville Prison until about Sept. 10th, Charleston, S.C., about October, 1864, and at Florence, S.C. in December, 1864. He was paroled under call for exchange of sick, and exchanged in April 1865.

He deems the most important event in his service his participation in the battle of Shiloh. The names of some of his intimate comrades: Capt. C.H. McCleary, Capt. J.G. Nuhfer, Capt. H. Dick, and G. Eberhart.

Comrade Gessner took part in all the battles and engagements of the 72’ Regt. O.V.I. including the Siege of Vicksburg, and always on deck, except when he was wounded.

He was discharged Sept. 20, 1865, by reason of the close of the war.

Hale, A.J. p. 54

Was born the 25th day of May, A.D. 1828, in Tyrone, County of Steuben, State of New York. He first entered military service May 20, 1861, at Fremont, Ohio, as 2d Lieut. of Co. E. 25th Regt., O.V.I. He held the office of Regimental Quarter Master; He served for a time on detail duty at Beverly, W. Va. The first battle in which he was engaged was that of Greenbrier, on Cheat Mt. W. Va., in Dec. 1861. He was in the 2d battle of Bull Run. He was on detached duty the greater part of his time while in the service, as Quarter-Master, on Regimental and Post duty. He was never wounded, nor in hospital, nor taken prisoner. He considers the most important event in his service, the 2d Battle of Bull Run, and his good fortune in keeping out of Rebel prisons.

He was finally discharged Feb. 22 1863, by reason of disability.

The names of some of his intimate comrades: Col. J.A. Jones, Lt. Col. Wm. Richardson of the 25th O.V.I. and Wm. Heyt, Capt. Moses Crowell, and Lieut. John Bowlus.

On the occasion of Comrade Hale’s Golden Wedding Anniversary, which was celebrated at his home, 1129, Birchard Avenue, Fremont, Ohio, he was presented with a gold-headed cane by the Comrades of Manville Moore Post.

Grant, John A. p. 55

Harlan, Geo. O. p. 56

Was born the 11th day of November, A.D. 1836, in County of Cumberland, State of Pennsylvania. He entered the military service at Rochester, Indiana, in 1862. He joined the Fourth Cavalry, Seventy-seventh regiment of Indiana Volunteers. At Perrysville, Ky., he was wounded by the falling of his horse. As soon as he was again fitted for service he was appointed veterinary surgeon for the United States Government, and served in the State Hospitals in Pennsylvania. At the close of the war he was appointed to assist in selling the useless supplies which the Government had accumulated, consisting of horses, saddles, blankets, etc. One of his shipments brought him to Fremont, Ohio, where he soon afterwards located.

Havens, Wm. J. p. 57

Was born the 13th day of December, A.D. 1833, in Jackson Tp., County of Sandusky, State of Ohio. He first entered military service July 31st 1863, at Fremont, Ohio, as First Lieutenant in Co. B. 50th Regiment, Ohio Home Guards; attended military drill at Toledo, O. in September ’63 and served several weeks in October, at Sandusky, O. in helping guard Johnson’s Island. On May 2nd 1864, he again entered active service, and went with his command to Cleveland, Ohio, and entered the U.S. Service. After reorganization and consolidation, the 50th Ohio Home Guards, became 169th O.V.G.I, and he was transferred to Company H., with the rank of First Lieut., and served at Fort Ethan Allen, Va.

He deems the most important event in his service, his being an officer of the Guard, on a dark night, about 4 miles from the Fort, at the time of Rebel Gen. Early’s attempted raid on Washington City.

He was sick in July with malarial fever and rec’d hospital treatment at Capt’s quarters, and also at Mt. Pleasant Hospital, Washington, D.C., in August 1864. The names of intimate comrades: Samuel Doll, Solomon Warner, Thomas J. Eldrige, Francis M. Boor. Valentine Shafer, and David Harley.

He was discharged at Cleveland, Ohio, Sept. 4th 1864, by expiration of term of service.

Havens, Hugh p. 58

Who was born the 8th day of October, A.D. 1835, in Jackson Tp., County of Sandusky, State of Ohio. He first enlisted for military service in the summer of 1863, at Fremont, Ohio, as a private in Co. B. 50th Regiment Ohio Home Guards, attended military drills at Toledo, O., in September, and served on guard duty in November, at Sandusky, Ohio. On May 2, 1864, he re-entered the military and went with his company to Cleveland, Ohio, where they were mustered into the U.S. Service, at Fort Ethan Allen, Va., 100 days. On the 9th of July he was detailed to serve as a nurse for his brother James W., who was sick, and he performed his duty faithfully.

He considers the most important event of his service the defeat of Early’s raid on Washington D.C.

Intimate comrades: Solomon Warner, Peter Keenan, F.M. Winters, V. Shale, Jacob Shale, W. J. Havens.

He was discharged Sept. 4, 1864: Exp. of term of service. After his return home he was drafted into the U.S. Service, but his health being impaired he hired a substitute at a cost of $1000.00 cash.

Heberling, George W. p. 59

Heffner, T.F. p. 60

Hershey, Oliver P. p. 61

Was born the 4th day of June, A.D. 1839, in Ballville Tp., County of Sandusky, State of Ohio. He first entered military service June 12, 1861 (Enrolled May 28, 1861) at Fremont, Ohio, as a private in Co. E., 25th Regt. O.V.I. He was promoted to the ranks of corporal and sergeant and on Oct. 17, 1864 to that of 2d Lieunt., and on May 18, 1865, to 1st Lieut. Of Co. H., which was his rank at the close of the war. He was first discharged Jan. 1, 1863, by reason of re-enlistment, at Hilton Head, South Carolina. The first battle in which he was engaged was Cheat Mt. West Va., and later ones at Greenbrier, West Va., Huntersville, where he was wounded in the left wrist, Jan. 2, 1862, Cross Keys, Freeman’s Ford, Second Bull Run, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Hagerstown, Fort Wagner, S.C., Heksin Crk., Honey Hill, Gregory’s Landing, Indian Hill, Devaux Neck, Combahe Ferry, Sumpterville, Dingell’s Mills, Red Hill, Swift Creek, Rafting Creek, Devaux Neck, Statesburg and Pocatalige Ferry.

He considers the battle of Gettysburg as the most important. At 2nd Bull Run he was longest under fire: 18 Days! And was for one week after that confined in Hospital at Alexandria Va.

Some of his intimate comrades were: A.J. Hale, Jesse Chance, Vincent Carroll, Harvey N. Hall, Thomas Howell, and Harrison Myers. He tendered his resignation Mar 28th 1866 and turned over his command, April 7, 1866.

Hineline, Wm. H. p. 62

Holcomb, J. p. 63

Was born the 18th day of August, A.D. 1846, in Riley Tp., County of Sandusky, State of Ohio. He first entered military service March 31, 1864, at Fremont, O. as a private in Co. B., 72d Regt. O.V.I., and served with his regiment until the close of the war. Among the battles he took part were: Paducah, Ky., Fishing Creek, Old Town Creek, Tishamauga, Spanish Fort, Fort Blakely, through Mo., after Gen. Price, Tishamauga Creek, Tupelo, Nashville. He was sick in the Hospital at Memphis Tenn. and when convalescent from typhoid fever was granted a furlough.

One of his most important events in his service was his capture of a stand of Rebel Colors, Dec. 16, 1864 on the day when his Brigade captured 2000 Rebel prisoners, 3 Generals and 16 pieces of artillery.

Among his intimate comrades: Mathias Schwartzlander, John Z. Macon, John G. Nuhfer, Marian Hawk, Dr. G. A. Gessner, Capt. Orrin England, and John Younkman.

He was at one time offered the captaincy of a company of colored men, which he declined. He was discharged Sept. 11, 1865 - close of the war.

Hutton, Joseph E. p. 64

Ickes, Franklin Q. p. 65

Was born the 15th day of September, A.D. 1845, in ______, County of ________, State of Pennsylvania. He first entered military service in 1863, under Capt. Fickes, 50th Regt., Ohio Home Guards, and helped guard Johnson’s Island, Sandusky Bay, 3 weeks where rebel officers were prisoners of war. He next enlisted on Co. K., 9th Regt. Vol. Cav. (Ohio) as a private, for 3 years, or during the war. The first skirmishes were at Athens, Center Star, and Decatur, Alabama. He was confined in the General Field Hospital, Bridgeport, Ala. from June until the following winter. He was at one time detailed on special service, as escort to General Hancock’s Veterans, from Columbus, Ohio to Washington D.C., making four trips. He was at Washington City the day before President Lincoln was assassinated. He was one of the Guards of Honor, at Columbus, Ohio when the body of Lincoln was brought there, and lay in state. (when being conveyed to his home at Springfield, Ill.)

The most dangerous duty he had to perform was to arrest a deserter, which he did with a squad of men, at Concord, N.C. He had a narrow escape June 1, 1864, near Decatur, Ala., when 300 of his regiment and a part of an Iowa battery, ten miles out, encountered a force of 5000 rebels, who flanked them and obliged Union men to cut their way back. He was the last man to leave their position, was ordered to halt and surrender, but though unseated by a sudden turn of his horse, luckily his spur caught in the saddle, and enabled him to cling to the animal’s neck and get away amid a storm of bullets.

On his return from the South the boat in which his company took passage, sprung a leak and took fire in Chesapeake Bay, when out of sight of land, but the fire was extinguished, and they reached Baltimore in safety. In the summer of 1865, on a steamer in Pamlico Sound, he met a rebel officer whom he had met at Sandusky, Ohio, two years before, and who in a condescending manner recognized him.

Intimate comrades: D.S. Moses, C.S. Elder, Francis M. Overmyer, Gen. E Woodruff, Valentine Lybarger, Dillon Ames. and John Ogle.

He was discharged August 3, 1865, at Camp Chase, Columbus, O. Exp. of service.

Johnson, Clark A. p. 66

June, Albert May p. 67

Who was born the 29th day of March, A.D. 1841, in York Tp., County of Sandusky, State of Ohio. He first entered military service April 21st 1861, at Fremont, O., as a private in Co. H. 8th Regiment, O.V.I., from which he was discharged in August, 1861, at Fremont. O., by reason of expiration of term of service.

He re-enlisted, in the Navy, and Engineer’s Department, on the steamer Gertrude, as the ship’s machinist. He was in the Western Gulf Blockading Squadron. The first battle in which he was engaged was in Mobile Bay, and a later one at Galveston, Texas. He was never wounded, nor confined in a hospital, nor taken prisoner.

He considered the most important event in his service the battle of Mobile Bay, which resulted in Admiral Farragut taking Fort Gains and Fort Morgan, seven miles below the city of Mobile, Ala.

He was finally discharged Nov. 5, 1864, by reason of expiration of term of service.

The names of some of his intimate companions are: Chief Engineer Brown, Assistant Engineer Charles Farceio, Wm Kettler, Hugh Canning, Charles Courser and Dr. Adam Shirk.

Kelly, V. W. p. 68

Who was born the 13th day of May, A.D. 1842, in Narridge Tp., County of Huron, State of Ohio. He first entered military service Aug. 1, 1861, as a private in Co. I., 2d Regiment, Iowa Volunteer Calvary. He held the position of Wagoner. He afterwards served in the militia, of Memphis Tenn., five months. The first battle in which he was engaged was at Farmingtion, Miss. The Union forces in the battle before Corinth lost 96 horses and 44 men in 15 minutes time. Later engagements are described in the History of the 2nd Iowa Cav. Regiment. He was present at the taking of New Madrid, and Island No. 10, and at the bombardment of Fort Pillow, under Gen. Pope. He was with General Rosencranz at Corinth when Gen. Price attacked that place. The affair lasted three days. He deems the most important events in his service those which are listed above.

The names of some of his intimate companions are:_______

He was discharged Sept 26, 1864. Exp. Serv.

Kent, H.W. p.69

Kleckner, George W. p. 70

Lee, Gabriel F. p. 71

Was born the 18th day of July, A.D. 1842, in ______, County of _______, State of ______. He first entered military service May 5, 1861, at Springfield, Missouri, for three months, as a private in Co. __, __ Regiment, from which he was honorably discharged Aug. 16th 1861. Then for a period of eleven months he was employed to buy beef cattle. He re-enlisted July 5, 1862, in John A. Lee’s Co., Colonel Phelp’s Regiment, 8th Mo. Cav., in which he served three years and fifteen days. They were of the Green and Christian Counties state militia. The first battle in which he was engaged was at Wilson Creek, Aug. 10, 1861. Later ones- Pea Ridge, Prairie Grove, Pumpkin Bend, Brownsville, Pilot Knob, Chauk’s Bluff and White River. After the taking of Little Rock he had fever and ague and lung trouble, but staid with his regiment, and was never in a hospital. At Prairie Grove he was wounded by a shell, on his hip, and at Brownsville injured in his right leg and ankle. He was never taken prisoner.

Among intimate comrades were: Capt. John Matthews, Capt. Karshner, James Morgan, Major Feed, Samuel Robinson, Thomas Forster.

Discharged Aug. 20, 1865. Little Rock, Ark.

Leiter, George W. p. 72

Who was born the 6th day of September, A.D. 1834, in Mansfield, County of Richland, State of Ohio. He entered military service Oct. 5, 1861, in his native place, as a private in Co. A. McLaughlin’s Squadron, O.V.C., 23d Army Corps. The first battle in which he was engaged was at Louisa, Ky. where he was afterwards confined in a hospital, one month, on account of rheumatism. Later engagements were at Big Sandy River and at Siege of Knoxville. He was never wounded. On the last of August, 1864, he was taken prisoner at Sunshine Church, in the rear of Atlanta, by Morgan’s men, in the Stoneman raid. He was confined in Andersonville prison about the last of Sept., and kept there three months, then taken to Florence, S.C., where after being confined two months, he was paroled and exchanged, Jan. 26, 1865, and returned to his home, via Columbus, O.

He considers the most important event, his imprisonment at Andersonville when there were between 30,000 and 40,000 Union men in the Pen.

He was discharged Jan. 26, 1865, by reason of expiration of term of service.

Intimates: Frank Gribbem, Frank Morris, Jonathan Morris, Maj. McLaughlin, Maj. McFall, Lieut. Samuel Fisher.

Lilley, Alfred p. 73

Loudensleger, E. p. 74

Who was born the 28th day of February, A.D. 1836, in Flat Rock, County of Seneca, State of Ohio. He first entered military service Nov. 23, 1861, at Clyde, Ohio, as a private in Co. A. 72nd Regiment O.V.I. He was transferred for a time, at Fort Pickering, to a Battery, in 1863, and later was detailed to serve in the Commissary Department of the Freedmen’s Bureau, at Memphis Tenn. The first battle in which he was engaged was that of Shiloh, or Pittsburg Landing, April 6 and 7, 1862. He was also at the siege of Corinth, and in various skirmishes. He was several times confined at hospital: At Regimental Hospital, Corinth, Miss., at Fort Pickering, winter 1862-3; rejoined regiment at White’s Station, near Memphis; took erysipelas and returned to hospital at Fort Pickering, until May, 1863; removed to Convalescent Camp, where he served on a Battery. During August 1863, went home on a furlough, and on his return was again taken down with a fever. As soon as convalescent he was put on special duty in the Commissary Dept. Freedmen’s Bureau.

Most important event in his service- the battle of Shiloh.

Intimate comrades: N.B. Mason, Harkness Lay, E. Harkness, Capt. C.L. Dirlam, and Capt. Herrington.

Discharged Dec. 13, 1864, Exp. Serv.

Loveberry, Jonathan p. 75

Who was born the 10th day of May, A.D. 1832, in Reading Tp., County of Perry, State of Ohio. He first entered military service in 1861, at Somerset, Ohio, as private in Co. E., 17th Regiment, O.V.I. from which he was discharged at Zanesville, Ohio, in August, 1861, by reason of expiration of term of service. He re-enlisted in Co. F. (Capt. Cupp, under Col. Ransom) in first Ohio Cavalry, from which he was discharged Sept. 8, 1862. He re-enlisted May 2, 1864, in Co. K. 50th Ohio Home Guards, (later the 169th Regt. O.V.I.) His rank at the close of the war was that of 1st Lieut. of Co. K. The first battle in which he was engaged was at Corinth, Miss., where he was confined for a time in a hospital.

He considers the most important event in his service the capture of 12 bushwackers, 12 miles from Parkersburg, West Va., without firing a gun, while he was under the command of “Bill Free.”

The names of some intimate comrades: Jacob Welch, Wm Rhoads, Harry Dellinger, John Neff, of 1st O.C. and Capt. H.R. Bowlus, and Philip A. Overmyer, of the 169th O.V.I.

He was finally discharged at Cleveland, O. Sept. 4, 1864, close of war.

Macon, John Z. p. 76

Who was born the seventeenth day of December, A.D. 1836, in Alsace, France. He first entered military service Sept. 24th 1864, at Sandusky, Ohio, as a private in Co. G. 64th Regiment, O.V.I. He served about two months as a clerk in the Provost Marshall’s Office, at Athens, Ala. The first battle in which he was engaged was at Spring Hill, Tenn. Later engagements at Franklin, Nashville, etc. He was never wounded and was only sick in camp about three weeks. He was never taken prisoner.

He considers the most important event in his service the battle of Spring Hill.

The names of his intimate comrades were Capt. Hancock, John McShesner, Everett Evens, Robert Fisher, and Ezra Whitner.

He was discharged June 1865, by reason of the close of the war.

At Athens, Ala. he saw an old slave who regretted being set free, and an old woman, once a slave, now in good circumstances, who had her former mistress, now poor, come to get meals at her gate.

Marvin, Orlo G. F. p. 77

Who was born the 17th day of July, A.D. 1844, in Andover, County of Ashtabula, State of Ohio. He first entered military service Aug. 13, 1864, as a corporal in Co. D. 177th O.V.I. at Jefferson, Ashtabula Co., O. The first battle in which he was engaged was at Murfreesboro, Tenn. Here he took part in various skirmishes, later, and also in North Carolina. He was never wounded, but was confined in hospital on account of sickness, three months, at Beaufort, N.C. from which he was sent to Nawberne, N.C.

He considers the most important events in his service the skirmish at Murfreesboro, previous to which time they had been short of rations, and for 22 days had been obliged to live chiefly on cornmeal, and not much of that, and forage for provisions as their supplies had been cut off by Gen. Hood.

Some intimate comrades were: Capt. R.H. Burr, A.B. Withenberry, Dalzell Laughlin, Harrison Turner, Lyman Creasy, and D. Root.

He was discharged June 21, 1865, by reason of the end of the war.

McDaniels, Herman N. p. 78

Who was born the twenty-ninth day of July, A.D. 1835, in Scott Tp., County of Sandusky, State of Ohio. He entered military service in August, 1862, at Fremont, Ohio, and was mustered in Toledo, O., as a private in Co. A. 111th O.V.I. He was promoted six times, and his rank at close of his service was that of Orderly Serg. He re-enlisted twice, but was not re-mustered. The first battle in which he was engaged was at Resaca. Among the other 34 battles and skirmishes were those which occurred in the march from Chattanooga to Atlanta, the Siege of Knoxville, battles of Franklin, Nashville, Eutaw Springs, Hickory Bottom, Fort Anderson, and Wilmington. He was never wounded or taken prisoner. He was several times sick and left at hospital, at Glasgow, Ky. one month, and at Hopkinsville, Ky.

Most important event in his service, was the charge on a Division of Rebel Infantry at Burnt Hickory Bottom.

He was discharged at Saulsburg, N.C., and finally discharged at Cleveland, O. by reason of expiration of term of service. (3 years.)

Names of some intimate comrades: Capt. J.V. Beery, Capt. Beals, Chas Hampsher, Martin Brunthauer, J.R. Tindall.

Mowery, Aaron p. 79

Who was born the second day of July, A.D. 1843, in Washington Tp., County of Sandusky, State of Ohio. He first entered military service Oct. 25, 1862, at Fremont, Ohio, as a private in Co. B. 72d Regt. O.V.I. and went with his regiment to the front. He was first discharged Sept. 4, 1863, at Columbus, Ohio, by reason of expiration of term of service. He re-enlisted May 2, 1864, in Co. K. 50th Regt. Ohio Home Guards, which was mustered into U.S. Service at Cleveland, O., and became the 169th Regt. O.V.I., and did service at Fort Ethan Allen, Va. The first skirmishes in which he was engaged were near Vicksburg, Miss. He was sick and confined in a hospital in the rear of Vicksburg, then in a field hospital, and later in Jefferson Barracks from May 22d until discharged.

He considers the most important event in his service the 18 days march from Kramp’s Landing to Vicksburg. He suffered from exposure to cold weather in the march from Guntown to Corinth.

The names of some of his intimate comrades are: George, Jesse and Samuel Mowery, his brothers; Marcellus Millius, Jos. Hunsingen, John McLemon.

He was finally discharged Sept. 4, 1864, at Cleveland, O. by reason of expiration of term of service.

Minkler, N. D. p. 80

Who was born the 21st day of May, A.D. 1846, in Vermilion, County of Erie, State of Ohio. He first entered military service August 25th 1864, at Sandusky, Ohio, in a squad of about 50 recruits for Gen. Sherman’s army at the front. They were put on duty to help guard Johnson’s Island, where rebel officers were confined as prisoners of war. Comrade Minkler was on duty every day for about two months, either on fatigue or guard duty. There was heavy work at unloading bailed hay from a scow, and he was ruptured so as to render him unfit for duty. He received credit for service in Co. H., 123 O.V.I., but he never got down South as he had planned.

An unfortunate circumstance hindered him. The second day after he got on Johnson’s Island he was put on guard duty, on the north shore, and while passing back and forth on his beat, in a dark night, went near where a dead body had been washed on the beach, and lay in a state of decomposition, emitting a very offensive smell. It was the body of the Captain of the Steamer Mayflower which had been wrecked in a violent storm on Lake Erie in the vicinity of Lorain, and it had been drifted by winds and waves into Sandusky Bay, about a week later. Comrade Minkler inhaled the poisonous odors all night long, and it laid the foundation for a very serious spell of typhoid fever after the company had been sent to Columbus, Ohio, to muster in for Sherman’s Army. He lay ill in the hospital in Columbus for three weeks and when convlescent was taken home to Lorain by his father. As soon as he was able he returned to Columbus to be mustered in, but was not allowed to muster, on account of disability, and was there discharged Sept. 21, 1864. He had been in irregular service about two months, under Col. Hill.

Some of his intimate comrades were, John Sutton, Thomas Lee, George Jarett, James Lee.

Mills, Willard p. 81

Who was born the 20th day of March, A.D. 1837, in Swanton, County of Lucas, State of Ohio. He first entered military service at Swanton, Ohio, in April, 1861, as a private in Co. F. 14th Regiment, O.N.G.I. at the first call for Volunteers for three months service. His company disbanded, and he then entered Co. I. 38th Regiment, O.V.I. in which he was detailed as Commissary Sergeant and Wagon-Master. The first battle in which he was engaged was at Wildcat Mountain, later ones at Stone Mountain, Chickamauga, Perryville, etc. He was sick for a time, and was quartered in the private house of a Mr. Bash, Somerset, Ky. He served as Hospital Steward at Chattanooga, and was for a time connected with the Field and General Hospitals. He took an active part in the dressing of wounds and taking care of the sick.

Most important events of his service were the battle of Stone Rio and Chattanooga.

Intimate comrades: Jefferson Mills, Capt. Williams, Col. Bradley, Lieut. Wright, Peter Hilburn, David Aton, Louis Aton.

He was discharged at Atlanta, Ga., Sept. 17, 1864, by reason of exp. of term of service.

Moses, Daniel S. p. 82

Who was born the 26th day of May, A.D. 1844, in Bedford, County of _______, State of Pennsylvania. He first entered military service in November, 1863, at Fremont, Ohio, as a private in Co. K. 9th Regt. O.V.I., said regiment participating in 62 engagements. He was taken prisoner near Talladega, Ala., July 16, 1864, on Gen. Rosseau’s Raid, from Dekatur, Ala. to Marietta, Ga. He was confined in Rebel prisons at Montgomery and Cahaba, Ala., Camp Millan, Black Shear, Thomasville, and Andersonville, Ga., in all 9 months and 10 days. He was released from prison Apr. 28, at Jacksonville, Fla., on account of close of the war.

Some of his intimate comrades were Francis B. Overmyer, Geo Hedges, F. Z. Ickes, D.S. Elder, I. E. Howard and Jacob F. Sprout.

He was discharged at Camp Chase, Columbus, O., by reason of Gen. Order 99, at close of war. He became a charter member of Moore Post, June 22d 1885.

Maurer, William p. 83

Who was born the thirty-first day of January, A.D. 1840, in Ballville Tp., County of Sandusky, State of Ohio. He first entered military service Aug. 7, 1862, at Fremont, Ohio, as a private in Co. K., 100th Regt., O.V.I. The first battle in which he was engaged was at Covington, Ky.; later ones Limestone Station, Pulaski, Columbia, Franklin, and others. He was wounded at Franklin, Tenn. in Dec. 1864, and confined in Hospital at Nashville; also at Brown’s Hospital near Louisville, Ky., and at Covington, Ky. He was taken prisoner Sept. 8, 1863, at Limestone Station, E. Tenn., by the forces of Stonewall Jackson. He was confined in Libby prison, Sept. 8th to 12th 1863, then 7 months in Belle Isle, during the winter of 1863-4, which he left in the Spring of 1864 by an exchange of prisoners, and went home via Baltimore, Annapolis, Columbus.

He considers the battle of Franklin as the most important event in his service.

He was honorably discharged May 23, 1865, by reason of disability resulting from wounds.

The names of his intimate comrades: Samuel Brinkley, James Fowler, John Fowler, Wm. Balesole, John Ernsperger, Chas. Heseman.

During the first year of his service he marched with his company in pursuit of John Morgan and Kirby Smith, over the greater part of Kentucky, fording streams, camping in open air, being often short of rations, and undergoing many other privations.

Nuhfer, John G. p. 84

Who was born the 17th day of August, A.D.1844, in Woodville, County of Sandusky, State of Ohio. He first entered military service Oct. 15, 1861, at Woodville, Ohio, as a private in Co. D. 72d Regiment, O.V.I. He was promoted as follows: ___________.

The first battle in which he was engaged was at Shiloh. Later those at Jackson, Miss., Siege and attack on Vicksburg, Siege of Corinth, Brice’s Cross Roads, Nashville and Spanish Fort. He was wounded in the arm at the 2d Battle of Jackson, July 16th 1863. He was not sick, nor confined in Hospital, nor taken prisoner. At the close of the war he was in command of two companies, E. and G., and at the same time acting Adjutant of the 72d Regiment, O.V.I.

He deems the most important event in his service his participation in the battles at Vicksburg, Miss., and at Nashville, Tenn.

Among his intimate comrades were: A.B. Mason, Dr. J.B. Rice, Capt. Andrew Nuhfer, O.W. Harrison, Elijah Niebel, and Michael Beckley.

He was discharged at Vicksburg, Miss., Sept. 11th 1865, by reason of the close of the war, having served three years and ____ months.

Pampel, E.W. p. 85

Pelton, Richard W. p. 86

Petty, Simeon p. 87

Who was born the 12th day of March, A.D. 1829, in ______, County of Perry, State of Ohio. He first entered military service at Washinton D.C., as a private in Co. G., 86th Regiment, Ill. V.I. The first battle in which he was engaged was at Perryville, Ky., Oct. 8, 1862, after which he went with Gen. Sherman’s Army in its march to the Sea, and clear on to Washington D.C. He was sick for a time and confined at Brown Hospital, Ky., and also at Nashville, Tenn. He was detailed as a scout, with a squad of 100 men, for six months, under Capt. Powell, and he served later as Orderly for Brig. Gen. Dolittle, of the First Mich. Regt. V.I.

He deems the most important event in his service, the battle at Perryville, but the hardest fighting at Resaca.

The names of some of his intimate comrades are: Lieut. Zuitzem, Edward Brien, Pat Murphy, Simon Hawkins, Nat. Hudson, Ike Merrick and John Rouble.

He was discharged June 6, 1865, by reason of the close of the war.

Quig, Francis p. 88

Who was born the 10th day of Dec., A.D. 1825, in _______, County of Entram, Ireland. He first entered military service at Perrysburg, Ohio, in April, 1861, as a private in Co. C., 21st Regt. O.V.I., Col. Jesse Norton, under Gen. J.D. Cox. The first battle in which he was engaged was at Scarey Crk., in July, in a movement against Rebel Gov. Wise, in Kanawha Valley. He was in the skirmish at Charleston, West Va. His command made excursions into Va., after three guerillas, brothers, who commanded a company of Cavalry. The brothers were killed. On the 4th of July they went to Ripley, Jackson Co., after Gov. Wise, but he and some of the leading citizens had skipped the town, leaving the roads barricaded and bridges and boats burned where they crossed the river. Although the time of the enlistment had expired, the 21st Regiment remained on duty until another regiment came.

Some of the intimate comrades of F. Quig were: Capt. Asher Cook, 1st Lieut. McMann, 2d Lieut. Lemuel Blinn, Antoine Jeneack, Chauncey A. Norton, Chas Mitchell, John Humb.

He was honorably discharged Aug. 12, 1861, by reason of expiration of term of service.

Proctor, Wm. E. p. 89

Who was born the 20th day of July, A.D. 1842, in Bloomfield, County of _______, State of Ohio. He first entered military service April 14, 1861, as a private in the Cleveland Light Artillery. He was afterwards promoted to the rank of Corporal. The first battle in which he was engaged was at Laurel Hill, Virginia. Among later engagements was that of Carrick Ford. He was never wounded nor taken prisoner nor confined in a hospital. He had the honor of pulling the lanyard that discharged the first cannon of the Civil War, after Sumpter, at Laurel Hill, Va. He served under Col. Burnett, of Cleveland, and Amos Townsend, Quarter Master. He was three weeks at Cincinnati at the time of the attempted raid upon that city, among the first to get there and the last to leave. These “Squirrel Hunters” were encamped in Covington, Ky.

Among his intimate comrades were: D. Kenney, C.L. Lane, H.H. Thorp, M.B. Gary, W.H. Crowell, E.D. Tamer.

He was discharged July 21, 1861, as a member of Co. I. 1st O.V.A., after a service of 90 days.

Ranck, D.A. p. 90

Rathbun, Chaplain L. p. 91

Who was born the 5th day of June, A.D. 1845, in Green Creek. Tp., County of Sandusky, State of Ohio. He first enlisted in military service as a private in Co. K. (Capt. Thompson) 50th Regiment, Ohio Home Guards, in the fall of 1863, and did guard duty several weeks at Sandusky, Ohio, near which, on Johnson’s Island rebel officers were confined as prisoners of war. He next entered service at Fremont, Ohio, May 2, 1864, in the same Co. and Regt., which was mustered into U.S. Service at Cleveland, O., and did guard duty 100 days at Fort Ethan Allen, Virginia. In the month of June he was taken sick with Typhoid fever, and lay in hospital near the Fort, under care of Dr.P. Beaugrand, assisted by Dr. Taylor. On the 4th of July he was supposed to be dying, but rallied, and recovered. He has ever since suffered from pains along his back caused by the severity of the remedies used to save his life.

He considers picket duty the most important event in his service.

Comrades were: DeWitt Bement, Burr Huss, C.R. Huss, John Patterson, Gilbert Williams, John Burg, and Flavel Downs.

Rimmelsbacher, Jacob p. 92

Who was born the 26th day of December, A.D. 1842, in Ballville Tp. County of Sandusky, State of Ohio. He first entered military service May 2d 1864, at Fremont, Ohio, as a private in Co. K. 50th Regiment, Ohio Home Guards, a part of which, after consolidation, at Cleveland, Ohio, became a part of Co. I. 169th Regiment, O.V.I. in U.S. Service. He served on Guard and Fatigue duty about 4 months, at Fort Ethan Allen, Va. About the last of July, 1864, he was taken sick with typhoid fever, and was confined in hospital, where he was visited by his parents, and cared for by his father until convalescent. He was in the Mt. Pleasant Hospital, Washington D.C., about two weeks previous to his muster out.

He considers the most important event in his service the defeat of General Early in his attempt to take Washington City.

The names of his intimate comrades are: Phineas Gilmore, Abel Willis, David Willis, Burton R. Huss, Chaplain R. Huss, Geo Karbler, Wm. Ott, John Stahl and David Halter.

He was discharged at Cleveland, Ohio, Sept. 4, 1864, by reason of expiration of term of service.

Before his enlistment, comrade Rimmelsbacher paid about one hundred dollars to help clear his township (Ballville) from military draft.

Rice, Dr. John B. p. 93

Who was born the 23d day of June, A.D. 1832, in Fremont, County of Sandusky, State of Ohio. He first entered military service April 25, 1861, as Assistant Surgeon of the 10th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served with his regiment under Col. Lytle, in Virginia. On November 25, 1861, he was promoted to Surgeon, and assigned to the 72d Regiment, O.V.I., in which he served three years, in the important campaigns in which it took part. During the war he was on different occasions assigned to duty as Surgeon-in-Chief of Lauman’s and Tuttle’s Divisions of the 15th Army Corps, and of the District of Memphis when commanded by Gen. R.P. Buckland.

One important event of his service was his prompt removal of the sick and wounded, so as to avoid their being captured by rebels, at the battle of Shiloh.

Some of his intimate comrades were: Gen. R.P. Buckland, Col. Wm. M. Lytle, Dr. Wm. Caldwell, Dr. G.A. Gessner, Dr. Wm. M. Kaull, Lt. Col. C.G. Eaton, Lt. Col. LeRoy Crockett, Maj. E.A. Rawson, Maj. S.A.J. Snyder, Capt. J.G. Nuhfer, Capt. H.S. Buckland, Capt. LeRoy Moore, Capt. O.O. England, Capt. John M. Lemmon.

He was discharged in November, 1864, by reason of expiration of term of service after having served three years and seven months.

Ridley, Samuel p. 94

Who was born the 9th day of August, A.D. 1844, in Greencastle, County of Franklin, State of Pennsylvania. He first entered military service Aug. 22, 1862, at Fremont, Ohio, as a private in Co. A., 111th Regiment, O.V.I. The first battle in which he was engaged was at Louden Station, Tenn. He took an active part in the battles at Knoxville and Atlanta, and in all the skirmishes and other battles of his command. He was sick and confined in a hospital at Covington, Ky., in Nov. 1862.

He deems the battle of Knoxville as the most important during his term of service.

The names of his intimate comrades are Eli Bruner, James Tindall, Samuel Jackson, Jacob Jackson, James Jackson, Elias Babione, Elias Hollenbauch, William Huffman, John Walker, Henry VanBuskirk and John V. Beery.

He was discharged May 29, 1865, at Cleveland, Ohio, by reason of the close of the war.

Rollins, Josiah R. p. 95

Who was born the 16th day of May, A.D. 1845, in Rice Tp., County of Sandusky, State of Ohio. He first entered military service at Fremont, Ohio, Aug. 16, 1861, as a private in Co. F. 49th Regiment, O.V.I. He was promoted during his service to the rank of 3d Sergeant. He was discharged at Camp Taylor, Cleveland, Ohio, July 8, 1861, by reason of exp. of 3 mo. of service. He re-enlisted in the 49th O.V.I. and was put on detached duty at Head Quarters, Army of the Cumberland. First battle, Shiloh- later ones, Pickett’s Mills, Franklin, Corinth, Lawrenceburg, Stone River, Liberty Gap, Chickamauga, Dallas, Kenesaw Mt., Chattahoochee Riv., Atlanta, Lovejoy Station, Columbia, Nashville. He was wounded at Pickett’s Mills in the right thigh. On Sept. 10th 1864, he served as mounted Orderly to Gen. Thomas. On January 25, 1865, he was blown up with the Steamer Eclipse, at Johnville, Tenn., when carrying dispatches for generals Thomas and Sherman, at Savannah.

He deems the Campaign to Stone River, and the battle, as the most important event in his service.

Intimate comrades: J.C. Parrish, Edw. Haff, Geo. Gurst, Wm. Whittacker, A.O. Bolton, Joseph Swatzmiller, J. Micklaus.

He was finally discharged Dec. 30, 1865, by reason of the close of the civil war.

Rooney, Daniel D. p. 96

Who was born the 18th day of March, A.D. 1839, in ________, County of Farmanah, Ireland, and reared at Glasgow, Scotland. He first entered military service at Hartford, Conn., as a private in Co. D. 14th U.S. Infantry, 2d Battalion. He was discharged Aug. 19, 1863, near Petersburg, Va., by reason of expiration of term of service. He re-enlisted in Sept. 1864, at Washington D.C. for one year, in Co. E. 2d Regiment, D.C. Volunteers. The first battle in which he was engaged was at Gaines’ Mills- later ones at Malvern Hill, Second Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, and Weldon Railroad. He was at one time slightly wounded in the left leg, but was never confined in hospital or taken prisoner.

He deems the most important event of his service doing guard duty at Alexandria, and was watching at night for J. Wilkes Booth after the assassination of President Lincoln.

Some of his intimate comrades: Sergt. P.J. Conway, Sergt. Nichols, Edwin A. Perry, Sergt. Peak, Sergt. Feely and private McCracken.

Finally discharged July, 1865- Gen. Orders, War Dept.

Roth, Hillarous p. 97

Who was born the 13th day of January, A.D. 1844, in Reading, County of Berks, State of Pennsylvania. He first entered military service as a private in Co. K. 151st P.V.I. from which he was discharged at Harrisburg, Pa., in August, 1863. He re-enlisted in January, 1864, in the 7th Regiment P.V.C. The first battle in which he was engaged was a Gettysburg, Pa., and later ones at Big Shanty, Kenesaw Mt., Rome, Columbus, Selma and Noon Day Creek, in Alabama. He was wounded on the first day’s battle at Gettysburg, taken prisoner, and held as such four days, during which time he saw Gen. Robert E. Lee, Commander in Chief of the Confederate Forces. He was recaptured by the Union Forces and taken to hospital, after 5th day’s battle. He was confined in hospitals, at Plymouth, Va., and Philadelphia and at Harrisburg, Pa.

He deems the most important event in his service the battle of Gettysburg, doing picket duty on the battle-ground of Bull-Run, and carrying dispatches at night at the battle of Kenesaw Mountain.

Some of his intimate comrades: John Wisner, Christian King, Comrade Lutz, Capt. Whitey, Col. Allen.

He was finally discharged at Macon, Ga., by reason of the close of the war.

Schlegel, John p. 98

Scovill, Clinton p. 99

Scranton, Albert H. p. 100

Who was born the 25th day of May, A.D. 1846, in Concord, County of Jackson, State of Michigan. He first entered military service, Aug. 7, 1862, at Grand Rapids, Mich., as a private in Co. H. 21st Regt. Mich.V.I. He was discharged in the Spring of 1863, at Louisville, Ky., by reason of heart disease and rheumatism. He re-enlisted in Co. E. 3d Regt. Mich. V.I. The first battle in which he was engaged was at Perryville, Ky., Oct. 8, 1862: later ones- Cove Spring, Pony Mountain, 2d Chancellorville, and the battle of the Wilderness, where he was wounded, May 6, 1864. He was captured with a train of wounded men May 8, 1864, but was re-captured next day. By reason of wound he was transferred to Co. A. Veteran Reserve Corps. He was confined in the hospital at Louisville, Ky., during the winter of 1862-3, and at Philadelphia, 1864.

Most important event in his service- The battle of the Wilderness.

Some intimate comrades- Samuel Anderson, James Spring, Chas Cooper.

He was finally discharged July 18, 1865, by reason of the close of the war.

Seibert, Monroe W. p. 101

Who was born the 21st day of March, A.D. 1843, in Jackson Tp., County of Lebanon, State of Pennsylvania. He first entered military service July 31st 1863, at Fremont, Ohio, as First Sergeant of Co. I. 50th Regiment, Ohio National Guards, attended the military drills at Toledo, Ohio, in September, and helped guard Johnson’s Island, near Sandusky, Ohio, in the Fall of 1863. On May 2d 1864, he reported for duty at Fremont, Ohio, and accompanied his regiment to Camp Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio, where he entered the U.S. military service, and on the re-organization of the 50th Regiment into the 169th Regiment, he was transferred to Company K. with the rank of First Sergeant, and served as such about four months at Fort Ethan Allen, Virginia.

He deems the most important event in his service the defeat of Gen. Early in his raid towards Washington D.C., July 10-11-12, 1864.

The names of some of his intimate comrades: A.J. Wolfe, Geo. L. Rearick, Geo. W. Skinner, James D. Benner, Daniel Stultz and I.H. Burgoon.

He was discharged Sept. 4, 1864, Cleveland, Ohio, by reason of expiration of term of service.

Shell, Absalom p. 102

Who was born the 8th day of April, A.D. 1839, in Madison Tp., County of Sandusky, State of Ohio. He first entered military service Nov. 19, 1861, at Fremont, Ohio, as a Corporal in Co. F. 72d Regt. O.V.I. The first battle in which he was engaged was that of Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., Apr. 6th and 7th 1862. Here he was taken sick with typhoid fever and chronic diarrhea, which resulted in a complication of diseases. He was sent to the hospital at Hamburg, Tenn., and remained in the service until July 16th 1862, when he was discharged by reason of general disability. He never afterwards was allowed to re-enlist on account of said disabilities. The same is so recorded on his discharge.

He considers the battle of Shiloh as the most important event in his service. He witnessed the removal of Lt. Col. Canfield from the battlefield of Shiloh to the boat at the Landing. He also witnessed the dictation of a will made to the chaplain of an Ill. regiment by a rebel officer, mortally wounded, who was said to be Gen. Johnston.

The names of intimate comrades: E.B. Moore, Peter A. Glass, Burt Rathbun, W.G. McIntyre, John Gilmore, James Gilmore, and Marshall Alford.

Shively, John A. p. 103

Who was born the 16th day of January, A.D. 1834, in ______, County of Richland, State of Ohio. He first entered military service July 5, 1862, at Fostoria, Ohio, as a private in an Independent Company of Sharpshooters, and later, in Co. K. 100th Regt. O.V.I. The first battle in which he was engaged was at Limestone Station, East Tenn. He took part, with his regiment, in various engagements in the Atlanta Campaign, including the battles of Franklin and Nashville. He was never wounded, but was in poor health and confined in hospitals in the winter of 1863-4. He was taken prisoner by rebel forces under Gen. Jackson, Sept. 8, 1864, in East Tenn., and confined in Libby prison and Belle Isle, Va., from Sept. 8, to Dec. 20, 1864, when he was released through the regular channel of exchange.

He considers the most important events in his service the caring for sick and wounded comrades during about one half of his service, having been promoted to the rank of Division Hospital Steward.

Some of his intimate comrades: Hiram Hines, Reuben Stine, Samuel Brinkley, Frank Russell, Ephraim Wheeler, and Lieut. Haff.

He was discharged at Cleveland, Ohio, July 2, 1865- close of the war.

Shively, Henry E. p. 104

Who was born the 11th day of November, A.D. 1824, in Weller Tp., County of Richland, State of Ohio. He first entered military service May 2, 1864, at Fremont, Ohio, as a private in Co. K. 50th Regt. Ohio Home Guards, (later the 169th O.V.I.) After a short service on guard duty he was detailed to take care of Silas Bowlus, who was very sick at the hospital, at Fort Ethan Allen, Va., which he did until the death of Bowlus. He was then appointed Ward Master, and served as such, until he himself got sick with typhoid fever, and was sent to Mt. Pleasant Hospital, Washington, D.C. When convalescent he was discharged Dec. 15th 1864, by reason of expiration of term of service. He afterwards went South to re-enlist, but was put into a Pioneer Corps, to work at his trade as a carpenter, in the building of bridges, at which he continued until the close of the war.

The names of some of his intimate comrades are: Wm. Deemer, A.J. Wolfe, Jessiah Wolfe, Frank Rideout, Haman Carr, T.F. Siegried, Charles June.

Siegfried Tilghman F. p. 105

Who was born the 12th day of September, A.D. 1833, in Salisbury, County of Lehigh, State of Pennsylvania. He entered military service May 2, 1864, at Fremont, Ohio, as a private in Co. F. 50th Regt. Ohio Home Guards, (afterward the 169th O.V.I.) He did guard duty at Fort Ethan Allen, Va., about four months. He considers the most important event in his service, picket duty outside of Fort Marcy, on the night of the battle between the Union Forces and the rebels under General Early when the latter were moving on towards Washington D.C.

The names of some of his intimate comrades are: Isaac Joseph, J.B. Myers, H.L. Smith, Henry C. Stacy, Henry E. Shively, G.J. Krebs.

He afterwards secured transportation to Chattanooga, Tenn., to work at his trade as a brick-layer and mason, for the U.S. Government, but his health would not permit him to do so. Wages were $4.00 per day and rations.

Slates, William p. 106

Who was born the 1st day of January, A.D. 1841, in _______, County of Huntingdon, State of Pennsylvania. He first entered military service July 1st 1863, at Mt. Union, Pa., as a private in Co. C. 67th Pa.V.C. He was discharged Jan. 5, 1864, by reason of expiration of term of service. He re-enlisted Dec. 22, 1864, on Co. C. P.V.I. The first battle in which he was engaged was in capturing a rebel picket line, just before Richmond, Va., was taken. Later engagements occurred in the final taking of Richmond. One fort was taken with a bayonet charge. He was in the battle at Hatcher’s Run, about one day’s travel from Appomattox. He was never wounded, but had typhoid fever in West Va., and was sent home about five weeks. He belonged to the 6th Army Corps, and was less than two miles from Gen. Robert E. Lee, when he surrendered. From Appomattox to Danville to reinforce Sherman against Johnson, but before they got there Johnston had surrendered.

Intimate comrades: Capt. Hiram E. Starkes, Hiram E. Warfield, Abraham Waggoner, and Adam Long. Alexander Parks, James Parks, and Abraham Corbin of the 29th P.V.C.

He was discharged July 7, 1865, at Philadelphia, Pa., by reason of the close of the war.

Skinner, Reuben p. 107

Simpkins, Eli p. 108

Smith, Dr. Geo. E. p. 109

Who was born the 27th day of June, A.D. 1832, in Lyone, County of Huron, State of Ohio. He first entered military service Dec. 23, 1862. He was commissioned Asst. Surgeon of the 76th O.V.I., and joined his regiment at Arkansas Post Jan. 14, 1863. He was present at the siege of Vicksburg, where he was taken sick, and was confined in the Officer’s Hospital at Memphis, Tenn. Obtaining leave of absence he returned to Ohio, and resigned his commission. He was then appointed on the Government Contract Service at Hillsdale, Mich., as examining physician and surgeon of Post Hillsdale. Here he remained from July, 1863, till March, 1865, when he went to Fremont, Ohio, and 16 years later to Oberlin, Ohio.

He considers the most important event in his service his work among the sick and wounded in getting them taken care of when they were first landed at Vicksburg.

The names of some of his intimate comrades were Charles R. Woods, Wm. B Woods, Willard Warner.

Swank, D.S. p. 110

Who was born the 4th day of April, A.D. 1845, in Niles, County of Trumbull, State of Ohio. He first entered military service May 2, 1864, at Cleveland, Ohio, as a private in Co. I. 164th Regiment, O.V.I., and served about four months in the defense of Washington City, D.C., at Forts Smith, Strong, Bennett, Haggerty, and other forts on the South side of the Potomac. At Fort Strong, on Arlington Hights, he became partly disabled from active service.

The names of some of his intimate comrades are: James Brown, George Youngs, Anarnias Ropp, Harrison Wire, B.F. Sieples, and David Elder.

He considers the most important event in his service being on vedette duty in front of Fort Strong on the night of Gen. Early’s attempted raid on Washington D.C.

He was discharged at Cleveland, Ohio, August 27, 1864, by reason of expiration of term of service.

Thompson, Charles p. 111

Who was born the 12th day of April, A.D. 1839, in Fremont, County of Sandusky, State of Ohio. He first entered military service in April, 1861, under the first call for three months Volunteers, at Fremont, Ohio, as a private in Co. F. 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was honorable discharged at the expiration of that service, in 1861. He afterwards re-enlisted as Capt. of Co. F. 50th Regiment, Ohio Home Guards, (which by consolidation at Cleveland, Ohio, in May, 1864, became the 169th Regiment, O.V.I.) and served about four months at Fort Ethan Allen, Va.

He was finally discharged at Cleveland, Ohio, by reason of expiration of term of service, Sept. 4th 1864.

The names of some of his intimate comrades: Charles A. Baldwin, Peter Kessler, George Krebs, I.H. Burgoon.

Tindall, James L. p. 112

Who was born the 4th day of May, A.D. 1838, in Ballville Tp., County of Sandusky, State of Ohio. He first entered military service Aug. 22, 1862, at Fremont, Ohio, as a corporal in Co. A. 111th Regiment, O.V.I. His rank at close of war was First Corporal. The first battle in which he was engaged was that of Stone River- later ones at Huff’s Ferry, Knoxville, Strawberry Plains, Rocky Face Ridge, Resaca, Burnt Hickory, Pine Mt., Kenesaw Mt., Peach Tree Crk., Atlanta, Lovejoy Station, also at Columbia, Franklin, and Fort Anderson, in none of which he was ever wounded. He was sick for a time in the Field Hospital at Atlanta. He was taken prisoner at Raleigh, N.C., Apr. 14, 1865, by Capt. Prescott of Gen. Johnson’s Scouts. He was confined in prison at Saulsbury, 20 days, from Apr. 14, then sent under a flag of truce to Durham’s Station, Gen. Kilpatrick’s Head Quarters. He rejoined his regiment at Raleigh, N.C.

He considers the most important event in his service the Siege of Knoxville, and the crossing of the Cumberland Mountains.

Among his intimate companions were: Charles Hampshire, Samuel Jackson, Eli Babione, Joseph Schwartz, John Walker, and John Halter.

He was discharged June 7, 1865, at Cleveland, Ohio, by reason of the close of the war.

Van Buskirk, Henry p. 113

Who was born the 12th day of February, A.D. 1841, in Hamilton Tp., County of Monroe, State of Pennsylvania. He first entered military service July 30, 1862, at Fremont, Ohio, as a private in Co. A. 111th Regiment O.V.I. The first battle in which he was engaged was at Stone River. He took part in later engagements at Huff’s Ferry, Louden Creek, Campbell Station, Knoxville, Strawberry Plains, Rocky Face Ridge, Resaca, Dallas, Burnt Hickory, Pine Mountain, Kenesaw, Peach Tree Creek, Atlanta, Lovejoy Station, Franklin, Nashville, and Fort Anderson. He was never wounded, only by a kick from a mule which laid him up about eight weeks, at Knoxville, Tenn.

He considers that the most important events in his service were foraging and stealing poultry. He was at one time, 1864, transferred to the ammunition train or the 23d Army Corps.

He was discharged June 27th 1865, at Saulsbury, N.C., by reason of expiration of term of service.

The names of some intimate comrades: Wm. Batesole, Fred Shawl, Frank Redman, Chas Hampshire, Jos Schwartz, and Chub Armstrong.

Van Epps, H.A. p. 114

Whitmore, Andrew p. 115

Smith, Henry B. p. 116

Who was born the 10th day of March, A.D. 1837, in Ovid, County of Seneca, State of New York. He first entered military service at Cleveland, Ohio, Aug. 4th 1862, in the 19th Ohio Vol. Light Artillery. The first battle in which he took part was during the Morgan Raid. He was in later engagements at Knoxville, Cumberland Gap, Resaca, Buzzard’s Roost, Kenesaw Mt., Chattahooche River, Atlanta, Franklin, Nashville. His command met Sherman’s Army at Wilmington, N.C. He was confined for a time in hospital at Hickman Bridge, Ky.

He considers the battle of Kenesaw Mt., and the siege of Atlanta as the most important events during his service.

The names of some of his intimate comrades are Samuel Sunderland, Joseph O’Dell, Wm. Spafford, Capt. Jos. C. Shields and Frank Gilbert.

He was discharged May 30, 1865, by reason of the close of the war.

Stahl, Henry G. p. 117

Who was born the 12th day of March, A.D. 1848, in ________, County of Sandusky, State of Ohio. He first entered military service April 20, 1861, at Fremont, Ohio, as a private in Company G, 8th Regiment, O.V.I. His rank at close of the war was that of bugler. He was first discharged Aug. __, 1861, by expiration of term of enlistment. He re-enlisted Sept. 10, 1861, in Co. D. 3d Regt. O.V. Cavalry. The first battle in which he was engaged was at the siege of Corinth- later ones, at Mumfordville, Bardstown, Lexington, Stone River, Stewart’s Creek, Middleton, Chickamauga, McMinville, Farmington, Decatur, Moulton, Noon Day Creek, Kenesaw, Vening Station, Peach Tree Creek, and about 70 minor engagements and skirmishes. He was never wounded nor taken prisoner, but was confined in Hospital at Camp __nson, with measles in May, 1861. From date of enlistment in the 3d O.V.C., Sept. 3, 1861, until Oct. 4, 1864, he was never absent from duty from any cause, and during that period participated in every battle and skirmish in which his regiment was engaged.

He deems the most important events in his service the battles of Murfreesboro, Chattanooga, and Chickamauga.

Some intimate Comrades: Col. C.B. Seidell, Col. J.W. Paramore, Wm. H. Russell, Wm. L. Stackhouse, Jacob Stahl, John Clary.

He was finally discharged Oct. 4, 1864, by reason of expiration of term of enlistment.

Stults, Daniel p. 118

Who was born the 27th day of November, A.D. 1838, in Washington Tp., County of Sandusky, State of Ohio. He first enlisted for military service July 31st 1863, at Fremont, Ohio, as a private in Co. K. 50th Regt. Ohio Home Guards. On May 2, 1864, he entered active service with his company, and soon after entered U.S. Service at Cleveland, Ohio, in the 169th Regt. O.N.G.I., which was sent to do guard duty 100 Days at Fort Ethan Allen Va. There he was detached from his company and assigned to duty in the Provost Marshall’s office, at Chain Bridge, Va. Under command of Col. Alvord he took part in a skirmish on the Leesburg Pike, with some of Mosby’s Guerrillas. He carried dispatches to Alexandria and points in Md. during the time of Gen. Early’s Raid. He was sick a few weeks, but never in a hospital. He was treated by Reg. Surgeon Dr. P. Beaugrand, and assistants. He considers the defeat of Gen. Early’s raid on Washington D.C. the most important event in his personal service.

Intimate comrades: H.R. Bowlus, Jonathan Loveberry, Bert Fisher, M.W. Seibert, Jessiah Wolfe, A.J. Wolfe, and Maj. Jacob Fickes.

He was discharged at Cleveland, O., Sept. 4, 1864, by reason of expiration of term of service.