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Civil War 150 OHIO
Hardesty Sandusky County, Civil War Sketches1885 A-P
Hardesty Sandusky County Civil War Sketches 1885 R -Z
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Sandusky County, Ohio Civil War Soldiers
African American Civil War Soldiers of Sandusky County
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Sandusky County, Ohio Examinations for Disability Exemptions, 1862
Manville Moore Post No. 525, Fremont, Ohio, G. A. R. Personal War Sketches
Eugene Rawson Post #32 GAR Muster Roll
Robert H. Caldwell #439 GAR Post with Biographical Sketches and Names of Members
Sandusky Co. Military Medical Exemptions: August 1865
19th Century Civil War Poetry Collection

 

 

 
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Military and Personal Sketches of Ohio’s Rank and File from Sandusky County in the War of the Rebellion

Hardesty’s Historical and Geographical Encyclopedia

1885

Surnames R - Z

[These sketches also include those of Sandusky County residents (1885) who enlisted elsewhere. The sketches contain minimal editing.]

Eugene Allen Rawson

Answered the first call for soldiers in the war of the Rebellion. He enlisted in the month of April, 1861, leaving the high school at Homer, New York, to enroll his name in the 12th New York Volunteer Infantry. He was promoted to the rank of sergeant and corporal for good soldierly conduct. He was transferred to the 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was appointed adjutant of his regiment in December, 1861. Soon afterward he received the rank of major of the 72d. Major Rawson participated in the battles of Shiloh, Tennessee, the first battle of Bull Run, siege of Corinth, Mississippi, siege of Vicksburg, and in several campaigns and engagements of less note. During a skirmish near Guntown, Mississippi, July 15, 1864, he received a wound which resulted in his death a week later, at Memphis Tennessee . Having served his country faithfully, and with distinction, for three years and three months, he gave his life in her defense. Post 32, G.A.R., honors his memory in its name. The great grandfather of Major Rawson was a colonel in the French army. Eugene A. Rawson was born at Fremont, Ohio, March 14, 1840. His father, Dr. La Quinio Rawson, was born in Franklin County, Massachusetts, September 14, 1804, and came to Ohio in March, 1824. He removed to Fremont in December, 1827, where he now lives a retired life. The mother of Eugene Rawson, Sophia (Beaugrand) Rawson, died at her home in Fremont, May 20, 1882, and rests beside her son. Major Rawson married at Homer, New York, August 31, 1863, Jennie Snyder, who was born in the state of New York .

Jonathan Ream

Enrolled as a private in Company G, 169th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He enlisted at Helena, Ohio, May 2, 1864, and belonged at first to the State Militia, being called on occasionally to drill. In 1864 the government was in need of troops to guard the national capital, and Mr. Ream and his comrades were glad to serve their country. They were sent to Fort Ethan Allen and relieved the more experienced troops, who then went into the field. The hot season was coming on and many of the men were taken sick; some of them never saw their homes again, but they lay down their lives without a murmur and with small glory. Mr. Ream was taken sick among others, but at the end of four months service he was discharged at Cleveland, Ohio, his papers dating September 4, 1864. He was born at Fremont, Ohio, September 20, 1836. His father is Gabriel Ream, and his mother’s maiden name was Elizabeth Heberling. Mr. Ream is a farmer, and his post office address is Helena, Ohio .

Joseph Reamer

April 18, 1861, answered the first call for soldiers. He enlisted at Monroeville, Ohio, as a private in Company G, 24th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He entered with the regiment the battles of Greenbrier, Cheat Mountain, Shiloh, Stone River, Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Buzzards Roost and Ringgold. The surgeon stated that Mr. Reamer had heart disease, brought on by becoming over heated on a march and then exposed on duty in camp. He also had much trouble with his eyes, having had powder in them. In 1862 he received the promotion to corporal, and after serving three years and one month was discharged at Camp Chase, Ohio, June 19, 1864. He is a member of C.B. Gambee Post, No. 33, G.A.R. Mr. Reamer was born in Peru Township, Huron County, Ohio, September 12, 1842, a son of Joseph and Mary Reamer. He married at Norwalk, Ohio, November 24, 1868, Celia Haffel. Mrs. Reamer was born in Huron County, Ohio, the daughter of Jacob and Mary (Byer) Haffel. Their children were born: Dora, March 12, 1870; Charles, July 31, 1872; Albert, August 16, 1876; Lotta, January 6, 1880; Joseph Jonas, August 6, 1881. Mr. Reamer is a farmer and resides near Bellevue, Ohio .

Daniel Reed

Entered the service of his country May 2, 1864. He enlisted at Fremont, Ohio, as a private in Company K, 169th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. During four months the regiment was stationed at Fort Ethan Allen. Mr. Reed and his comrades were engaged in the performance of guard duty, though they would have been glad to go into the field. While here he was taken sick and has never fully recovered. He was discharged at Cleveland, Ohio, September 5, 1864. Mr. Reed was born in Washington Township, Sandusky County, Ohio . His parents are Peter and Mary (Burket) Reed. At present he is engaged in the peaceful occupation of farming. His post office address is Lindsey, Ohio .

Joseph Reed

During the first year of the war enlisted at Fremont, Ohio, as a member of Company C, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He veteranized with his regiment, and engaged with them in the battles of Shiloh, Tennessee, the siege of Corinth, Mississippi, and in many minor encounters with the enemy. On several occasions Mr. Reed was placed on detached duty. The only engagement of his regiment in which he did not take part was at Guntown, Mississippi . During this battle he was detailed on special duty. For nearly four years he was a soldier in the army of his country, and was discharged at Columbus, Ohio . He is a member of Lewis Baker Post, No. 172, G.A.R. Mr. Reed was born in Perry County, Ohio. His parents are Joseph Reed and Sarah Reed. He married at Fremont, Ohio, Mary Burket. Mrs. Reed was born in Perry County, Ohio, a daughter of John Burket. They have five children: Lucy A., resides in Wood County, Ohio ; Joley, John, Mary and Henry, reside in Sandusky County . Mr. Reed has a fine farm which he is engaged in cultivating. His post office address is Hessville, Sandusky County, Ohio .

Morris Rees

Enlisted at Woodville, Ohio, October 26, 1861, as a private in Company D, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was promoted to 1st sergeant December 13, 1861, to 2d lieutenant September 5, 1862, 1st lieutenant April 9, 1864, and afterward promoted to captain. He veteranized with his regiment January, 1864, at Germantown, Tennessee . In the battles of Shiloh, Vicksburg, Jackson, Brandon and Guntown, Mr. Rees took an active part. He was captured at Guntown, Mississippi, June 11, 1864, and held at Macon, Georgia, two months, at Charleston, Columbia, and Goldsboro, for seven months. He made his escape for fifteen days, but was recaptured. During his prison life he endured the hardships of the infamous prison pens of the South with courage. He made his escape with two lieutenants of the 123d Regiment by taking the place of men who were bringing wood. In a short time Mr. Rees was unable to march, as his shoes were worn out and his feet sore. He begged of the others to go on and leave him. They, at first, refused, but in a few days he was alone. He traveled on as best he could for several days, and then, tired and hungry, he stopped at a house. He told the ladies who were there that he wanted to get to some friends at Augusta, Georgia, but he did not mention that these friends were in Sherman ’s army. They were very kind to him, but in the evening a Confederate officer came, supposing him to be a rebel deserter, finding that he was a Yankee took him home. Here he also received the kindest treatment from all members of the family. In the morning they loaded him with provisions and sent him, by rail, to Columbia . He went back to his prison, and found his tent with “Old Dog Tray” in it. About the 1st of March, 1864, he was sent, with fourteen hundred others, to Goldsboro for exchange. A train containing about 200 prisoners, among whom was Mr. Rees, jumped the track, and they all narrowly escaped being killed. They heard that near them was a camp of private soldiers, and as the brother of Captain Rees was captured at the battle of Guntown also, he went to this camp to find him. Lying on the ground, without shelter from the rain, too weak and sick to move, Captain Rees found his young brother. He asked permission of the rebel officer in charge to take his brother to the North with him, but his request was refused. Captain Rees then said that if his brother remained South and died he would find the rebel officer after the war. At length permission was granted and they started North. The brother did not reach home, however. He died in New York . Three years and six months Captain Rees was in the army, and was discharged at Washington, District of Columbia, April 25, 1865. He is a member of the G.A.R. Post at Bradner, Ohio, He was born in Harmony Township, Morrow County, Ohio, August 25, 1838, the son of David and Annie (Morris) Rees. His grandfather died in Baltimore, Maryland, of yellow fever, soon after landing in this country from Wales . His father was born in Wales, May 10, 1795, and came to America in 1800. He moved to Ohio, and during the war of 1812 he carried supplies through the Black Swamp to Fort Meigs for General Harrison’s army. He settled in Madison Township, Sandusky County, in 1854, moving from Morrow County, where he had resided since 1820. He married in 1821, and was the father of ten children, two of whom are now living. His wife died June 17, 1871. For fifty years he has been a deacon in the Baptist Church and a temperance worker for forty years. He is still living at the age of ninety years, and is in good health. Morris Rees was married in Madison Township, October 25, 1857, to Elizabeth Ladd, born in Columbiana County, Ohio, October 15, 1838, the daughter of Cornelius and Thursa (Myers) Ladd. Their children were born: Allen D., August 5, 1858, now living in Madison Township ; Anne T., August 10, 1866, died February 8, 1870; Emma, January 15, 1871, died May 3, 1872; Alta, May 10, 1874; and Sarah, April 27, 1876. Mr. Rees is a farmer, and resides near Pemberville, Ohio .


Chauncey Reynolds

At the age of sixteen, enlisted as a private in Company F, 72 Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He enrolled at Fremont, Ohio, September 9, 1861, and his regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 1st division, 15th army corps. At Germantown, Tennessee, he re-enlisted January 2, 1864, entering the same company. Mr. Reynolds participated in the battles of Lick Creek, Shiloh, Russell House, two engagements at Corinth, Grand Gulf, Port Gibson, two encounters at Jackson, Brandon, and the siege of Vicksburg, and several other engagements. At the battle of Guntown, Mississippi, June 12, 1864, he was taken prisoner, and he was held at Andersonville seven months, suffering all the privations and hardships of that infamous prison. He once unknowingly walked over the dead line and his life was saved by a comrade, who pulled him back. When sent to Baltimore to be exchanged, he was so weak that they had to carry him. His weight on entering prison was one hundred and fifty-six pounds, and on being released he weighed but ninety-eight pounds. Mr. Reynolds was born at Fremont, Ohio, October 17, 1845, a son of George and Maria (Prior) Reynolds. He married at Fostoria, Ohio, February 21, 1878, Effie A. Bender, born in Seneca County, Ohio, the daughter of Captain W. E. Bender and Prudence (Doke) Bender. They have two children: George W., born May 10, 1880, and Bessie, born July 17, 1884.

John B. Rice M.D.

Entered the three months service as assistant surgeon of the 10th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, in May, 1861. Previous to moving into Virginia in June, the regiment re-enlisted for three years. November 25, 1861, Dr. Rice was promoted to surgeon and assigned to the 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served with this regiment more than three years, in the campaigns and engagements in which it took part; also as surgeon of brigade and division, and as surgeon-in-chief of the district of Memphis, Tennessee . He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R.

George Rinehart

Entered the Union army at Fremont, Ohio . He enlisted as a private in Company G, 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and his regiment was assigned to the 3d brigade, 3d division, 2d army corps. Mr. Rinehart shared with his regiment its marches and numerous skirmishes, and took an active part in the battles of Antietam, Gettysburg and Chancellorsville . He was twice wounded, through the foot and in the knee. He now draws a pension for his services. At the end of three years and ten months he was honorably discharged at Columbus, Ohio . Mr. Rinehart is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, G.A.R. He was born in Germany, August 10, 1840. His parents are Jacob and Sarah (Smith) Rinehart. At Fremont, Ohio, December 10, 1865, he was united in marriage to Isabella Wright. Mrs. Rinehart was born in Ottawa County, Ohio . They have one daughter, Matilda, born August 19, 1867, now residing in Kansas . Mr. Rinehart resides at Fremont, Ohio, where he is engaged in business as a laborer.

Milton Rockwell

On the 7th of November, 1861, enlisted at Huntingdon, Pennsylvania . He enrolled as a private in Company A, 84th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. He re-enlisted as a veteran at Brandy Station, Virginia . During his veteran furlough he was taken sick and was not mustered as a veteran. The regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 2d division, 3d army corps. Mr. Rockwell engaged with his regiment in the battles of Winchester, Virginia, Port Republic, 2d Bull Run, Cedar Mountain, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, and a number of skirmishes of less note. At the battle of Chancellorsville he was taken prisoner. Half an hour after, the Union cavalry made a charge and Mr. Rockwell made his escape with them, though a hole was shot in his hat in the attempt. He was detailed to special duty in the quartermasters department, where he performed various duties. At one time he went out foraging in charge of five mule teams. The rebels surprised them and they had to make all possible haste to reach the picket line to escape capture. In January, 1862, he started with General Shields across the mountain to Bath, Virginia . Before reaching there they encountered Stonewall Jackson with fifteen thousand men, and were driven back, fording the Potomac river in their retreat. The greater part of Mr. Rockwell’s service was in West Virginia, under Shields, Meade, Burnside and Hooker, and he was constantly employed. After the battle of Bull Run the regiment had but one hundred and forty men and was obliged to recruit. At the end of two years and three months, Mr. Rockwell was discharged at Brandy Station, February, 1864. He was born in Fulton County, Pennsylvania, April 12, 1841, a son of Milton and Rosana (Tice) Rockwell. He married, in Sandusky County, Ohio, in January, 1871, Susan Newcomer, born in Indiana, the daughter of John and Elizabeth (Burket) Newcomer. They have two children, one son, G. B. McClellan, born December 21, 1871, and a daughter, Ida, born September 12, 1873. Mr. Rockwell resides at Gibsonburg, Ohio . His business is drilling artesian wells.

Moses Rogers

Enlisted in Sandusky County, Ohio, August 18, 1861. He enrolled as a private in Company F, 49th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. His regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 3d division, 4th army corps. He re-enlisted at Fort Rosecrans, Tennessee, February 1, 1863, entering the same company and regiment. The first encounter of the regiment with the enemy was at Green River, Kentucky . At Pittsburg Landing they had a severe engagement, and Mr. Rogers was detailed to assist in burying the dead. He was actively engaged at the siege of Corinth, Mississippi, then went to Chattanooga, thence to Kentucky, skirmishing nearly all the way. At the battle of Stone River, Tennessee, December 31, 1862, he was wounded and taken prisoner. He was held at Libby prison for thirty days. After exchange he was sent to Columbus, Ohio, then started to rejoin his regiment but was detained at Fort Rosecrans and kept on duty in the fort guarding the town, until his re-enlistment. Mr. Rogers was at the siege of Atlanta, Georgia, the battle of Resaca, and many minor engagements. At the end of four years of faithful service, he was discharged at Victoria, Texas, November 1, 1865. He was born in Hocking County, Ohio, November 4, 1839. His parents are Isaac and Elizabeth (Dennis) Rogers. Near Clyde, Ohio, March 10, 1872, he married Sarah Arnold. Mrs. Rogers was born at Delaware, Ohio, June 15, 1853, the daughter of Christian C. and Sarah (Wilt) Arnold. Four children have been born to them, as follows: Minnie, January 28, 1873; Henry Alvin, September 20, 1875; Ida, March 28, 1877; and John M., January 25, 1879. Mr. Rogers is the proprietor of a hotel at Clyde, Ohio .

William H. Rogers

Enlisted in Sandusky County, Ohio, August 8, 1862. He enrolled as a private in Company K, 100th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and his regiment was assigned to the 3d brigade, 3d division, 23d army corps. Mr. Rogers was promoted to the rank of corporal. He engaged with his regiment in the battles of Knoxville, Tennessee; Buzzards Roost, Resaca, Kenesaw Mountain, Burnt Hickory, Altoona Mountain, Atlanta, Georgia; Columbia, Franklin, and Nashville, Tennessee, and in the encounter at Wilmington, North Carolina. He shared with his regiment the dangers of all their engagements except that at Limestone Station, Tennessee, and was at one time under fire sixty days. At the end of a service of about three years Mr. Rogers was discharged at Greensboro, North Carolina, and mustered out at Cleveland, Ohio, in June, 1865. He was born in Hocking County, Ohio, March 9, 1844, a son of Isaac and Elizabeth (Dennis) Rogers. In Sandusky County, Ohio, September 4, 1870, he was united in marriage to Lydia A. Frees, born in Sandusky County, January 20, 1852, the daughter of Silas and Eliza (Reed) Frees. They have six children, who were born: Geneva, May 11, 1872; Ernest, July 1, 1874; Lynn, April 6, 1876; Maggie, February 4, 1878; Silas, April 9, 1880; and Edith, October 8, 1882. Mr. Rogers is engaged in business as a tile and brick manufacturer. He resides at Whitmore Station, Sandusky County, Ohio .

Henry J. Roush

Enlisted at Clyde, Ohio, February 29, 1864, as a private in Company A, 72 Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was then a part of the 2d brigade, 2d division, 16th army corps. He engaged in the battles of Tupelo, Mississippi and Holly Springs, the siege of Oxford and the siege of Mobile . He was detailed as orderly for General A. J. Smith and employed in carrying dispatches. While in the performance of this duty he had many narrow escapes from capture and death. At one time not having heard from his wife for two months he was anxious to reach his regiment and get his mail. He found the rebel sharpshooters so busy that he could only get within sight of his regiment, and had to wait until the next day for his letters. He was detailed on foraging expeditions and was very successful in obtaining a good supply of provisions. At the time of the Nashville engagement Mr. Roush was thrown from his horse and injured his hip so severely that it has had a running sore ever since. In September, near Brownville, Arkansas, he received a sunstroke and had an operation performed which left his forehead disfigured. One year and seven months he was a brave and faithful soldier. He was discharged at Vicksburg, September 11, 1865. He was born in Sandusky County, Ohio, July 5, 1836, a son of Thomas and Mary M. (Orwig) Roush. He married in Sandusky County, in a wagon, April 1, 1874, Avice E. Kelly, born in Wood County, Ohio, February 19, 1851, the daughter of Charles and Sarah T. (Duble) Kelly. They have two children: Herbert E., born October 4, 1876; and Wallace H., born April 24, 1880. The first wife of Mr. Roush was Matilda Gessner. The children by this marriage were born: Charles R., October 20, 1866; Frederic, in October, 1868, died in August, 1874; Edith, April, 1870; and Ada, September, 1872. Mr. Roush is a farmer and resides near Rollersville, Ohio .

George S. Royce

Answered the first call of his country and enlisted April 15, 1861, at Ottokee, Fulton County, Ohio . He enrolled as a private in Company H, 14th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was in service in Western Virginia . After the close of the three months service, he re-enlisted at Fremont, Ohio, November 15, 1861. He entered Company K, 57th Ohio Volunteer Infantry as a private. The battles in which he took an active part were those at Philippi, Laurel Hill, Shiloh, siege of Corinth, Iuka, Chickasaw Bluff, Arkansas Post, Champion Hills, Big Black River, Vicksburg, Missionary Ridge, Dalton, Buzzards Roost, Dallas, Resaca, Jackson, Kenesaw Mountain and many other engagements in which he did his duty as a brave and faithful soldier. He was detailed to assist in destroying the Memphis & Charleston Railroad. Once, while out foraging, the rebels attacked them but they drove them back. At the battle of Kenesaw Mountain, June 27, 1864, Mr. Royce was wounded in the right leg below the knee. He was, at the time, on the skirmish line, and walked and crawled back until some of the boys took him and carried him to the field hospital. The pain of his wound was intense, and he was never able for duty again. He was discharged at Nashville, Tennessee, November 29, 1864, at the end of three years and five months of service. October 23, 1829, he was born in Sandusky County, Ohio, a son of E. W. and Mary (Sharp) Royce. He married at Fremont, Ohio, January 8, 1865, Mary E. Fox, born in Wyandot County, Ohio, the daughter of Jonathan and Margaret (Daum) Fox. Their only son, Harry Irvin, was born July 18,, 1878. Mr. Royce is a laborer and resides at Gibsonburg, Ohio .

Frederick Ryser

Became a soldier January 28, 1865. He enlisted as a private in Company E, 186th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 2d brigade, 2d division, Army of the Cumberland . Mr. Ryser served during eight months and was several times detailed as guard over prisoners. While in the performance of this duty he was severely injured on the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad. The train on which they were transporting prisoners jumped the track, and Mr. Ryser was injured internally. He was discharged at Nashville, Tennessee, and mustered out of service at Camp Chase, Columbus, Ohio . He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. At Berne, Switzerland, he was born December 14, 1840, a son of Frederick and Ann E. (Gigax) Ryser. Mr. Ryser is a butcher by trade but is at present occupied in farming. His post office address is Fremont, Ohio .

Elijah Scott

Before he had reached his seventeenth birthday enlisted in the defense of his country. He enrolled as a private in Company F, 49th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, at York Station, Sandusky County, Ohio, February 16, 1864. The regiment was then in service in the 1st brigade, 3d division, 4th army corps. The first engagement of the regiment in which Mr. Scott took part was at Rocky Face Ridge, where three comrades of his were wounded. At Kingston, Georgia, they had a small engagement, and next met the enemy at Pine Mountain . The major of the regiment stood on the breastworks viewing the rebel lines when a grapeshot struck at his feet. He disappeared below the works, but soon mounted them again. While marching near Resaca, Georgia, they were suddenly ordered into line of battle. They commenced fighting at ten o’clock in the morning of Friday, and remained on the battle-field until late Sunday night. During seven hours they were under a heavy fire, with the bullets falling around them like rain. During the engagement a lieutenant asked Mr. Scott for his gun, who put in a double charge and handed it over. The gun did good service, although it knocked the lieutenant over at the first discharge. The Union army was victorious, and took many prisoners. After an active service of one year and eleven months Mr. Scott was discharged at Columbus, Ohio, December 30, 1865. He was born in York Township, Sandusky County, Ohio, April 6, 1847, a son of Isaac and Sarah (Goodridge) Scott. He married at Fremont, Ohio, February 29, 1864, Lucy King, born in Illinois, October 4, 1850, the daughter of Alexander and Lucy (Purtilance) King. They have four children, who were born: Frank, September 5, 1868; Willie, January 15, 1870; Estella, July 14, 1875; and Ernest, September 24, 1878. Mr. Scott resides near Clyde, Ohio, and is engaged in the cultivation of his farm.

O. B. Sharp

In May, 1861, enlisted at Green Springs, Ohio, as a private in Company F, 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. In August, 1861, he enlisted in the 1st United States Chasseurs, and participated in the battles of Fair Oaks, Turkey Bend, and was under fire an entire day at Antietam . He then went to Fredericksburg, Virginia . Here they did not accomplish much, but the chasseurs held the enemy back until the whole Union army had crossed the Rappahannock River . They went into winter quarters, and when the spring campaign opened, Mr. Sharp was mustered out of service on account of disability, March 14, 1863. He went home and remained until the fall of 1864, when he was drafted and entered the 32d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. They went to Columbus, Ohio, and were ordered to Nashville, Tennessee, where they met Hood’s forces and defeated them. They were then sent to Annapolis, Maryland, and took a boat to Beaufort, North Carolina, where they went into winter quarters. In the spring they went to Kinston, where they again defeated the rebels. They were then ordered to Raleigh, and assigned to their several regiments under General Sherman in the 17th army corps. In pursuit of Johnston they were within four miles of him when he surrendered, which ended their battles, and they went to Washington, District of Columbia . At Louisville, Kentucky, several weeks later, they were mustered out of service. Mr. Sharp was in the army about four years. He was born in Connecticut, August 30, 1829, the son of John and Sabra (Newberry) Sharp. HE married in Michigan, in 1863, Caroline Hoover, daughter of John Hoover. Mr.s Sharp died in 1866. One daughter was born to them, Ellen, on April 10, 1864, who is now married to Isaac Beard and resides in the State of Illinois . Mr. Sharp is a blacksmith, and resides at Green Springs, Ohio .

Isadore Shell

Enlisted at Rollersville, Sandusky County, Ohio, on the 2d of August, 1862. He enrolled as musician in Company A, 111th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 2d brigade, 2d division, 23d army corps. At the battle of Frankfort, Kentucky, Mr. Shell first encountered the enemy. After capturing the town they drove the rebels out, and then marched to Perryville. During this march, at Shelbyville, the enemy had scattered in every direction, and the Union force was divided up going in search of them. Many prisoners were taken. They then went to Bowling Green into winter quarters. In the spring the first adventure was the march after Morgan. The rebels were mounted, and day and night the boys in blue marched on foot, stopping hardly long enough to eat or rest. The hardships of this campaign were too severe for Mr. Shell, and he was taken sick. He spent five months in the hospital. After thirteen months service he was discharged at Louisville, September 1863, but was unable to leave the hospital until several weeks later. He draws a pension of six dollars a month for his disability. In Hamilton Post, No. 90, G.A.R., he holds the office of adjutant. He was born in Sandusky County, Ohio, December 8, 1845, the son of Abram and Lydia (Fought) Shell. He married in Scott Township, Sandusky County, February 9, 1870, Mary D. Jennings, born in Madison Township, Sandusky County, July 26, 1847, the daughter of Joseph H. and Eleanor P. (Evans) Jennings . They have five children, who were born: Bertha E., March 27, 1871; G. Albert, September 16, 1872; Horace A., October 21, 1874; R. B. Hayes, December 25, 1876; and Bracy J., April 6, 1879. Mr. Shell is a farmer, and resides near Bradner, Wood County, Ohio .

John A. Shively

Entered Captain Callehan’s Company, and was transferred to Company K, 100th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, under Captain Haynes. He enlisted at Fostoria, Ohio, July 5, 1862, and his regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 3d division, 23d army corps. Mr. Shively was promoted to color-sergeant in July, 1864, near the Chattahoochee River . He entered with his regiment into the battles of Limestone Station, three engagements at the siege of Atlanta, Georgia, and Franklin, Tennessee . In two of these battles he carried the colors and in two a musket. At the battle of Franklin he was attached to the field hospital as wardmaster. September 8, 1863, at Limestone Station, East Tennessee, Mr. Shively was taken prisoner. This engagement lasted three hours and one-half, and the enemy was nine times the number of the Union soldiers. He was taken to Libby, and thence to Belle Isle, where he remained about three months. Before his capture he was assigned to special duty as wardmaster, and served at Frankfort, Kentucky, for three months, receiving twenty-five cents a day extra pay. After his release from prison he served as hospital sergeant at Annapolis, Maryland, for three months, also with is division hospital in the wounded ward. He was in the army during three years, and was discharged at Cleveland, Ohio, July 4, 1865. He is a member and past and present officer of Hamilton Post, No. 90, G.A.R. Mr. Shively was born in Richland County, Ohio, January 16, 1834, a son of Daniel and Catherine (Miller) Shively . He married in Scott Township, Sandusky County, Ohio, September 8, 1859, Alvina C. Moore, born in Sandusky County, a daughter of Elisha and Phoebe (Smith) Moore. Their children were born: Arthur L., November 8, 1860; Eurith May, February 16, 1862; Louis Sanford, December 9, 1866; and Alton Louvaine, December 8, 1868. Mr. Shively is a farmer and carpenter. His post office address is Bradner, Wood County, Ohio .

John Shriver

Enlisted September 3, 1864, as a private in Company C, 25th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He engaged with his regiment in the battle of Honey Hill, South Carolina . They entered the engagement with nine hundred men, and came out with but six hundred. In the encounters with the enemy at Red Hill and at Singleton Plantation they were more fortunate, and did not lose a man. They burned the railroad bridge to cut off the supplies from Charleston to Savannah . The regiment to which Mr. Shriver belonged went to the assistance of the 144th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, which was being defeated, and reversed the tide of battle. At Pocataligo, South Carolina, they captured a large number of prisoners and held the enemy in check for five days. An attempt was made to take the front, but they were repulsed with the loss of two men. Then followed a succession of skirmishes lasting twenty-eight days. At Hilton Head, South Carolina, Mr. Shriver was ruptured, but continued on duty. His service lasted ten months, and he was discharged at Charleston, South Carolina, July 15, 1865. He was born at Wabash, Indiana, August 19, 1831, a son of George and Hulda (Wood) Shriver. He married near Bellevue, Ohio, June 25, 1859, Amelia Ford, born in Devonshire, England, December 22, 1835, the daughter of William and Mary (Doll) Ford. Their children were born: Edward William, March 30, 1860; Hulda Josephine, March 15, 1862, died September 14, 1862; Frederick J., January 17, 1864; George N., July 14, 1866; Herbert Grant, March 27, 1868; Carrie, January 13, 1871, died October 2, 1878; Della M., February 16, 1872; Thomas B., April 2, 1874; John, April 15, 1876, died October 2, 1878; and Benjamin F., February 28, 1881, Mr. Shriver is occupied as teamster and farmer in Bellevue, Ohio.

Henry R. Shull

Leaving the comforts of home, enlisted at Bedford, Pennsylvania, September 16, 1861. He enrolled as a private in Company K, 55th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. During a part of his service he was transferred to the artillery. He engaged in the battle of Pocataligo, South Carolina, and the regiment then went into Florida, where they had several engagements with the enemy. They were also in the battles of Chester Station, Virginia, Howlett House, Virginia, and were in the entrenchments near Bottom Church, Virginia, from May 20 to June 2, 1864, and in front of Petersburg, July 21, 1864. In all of these engagements the Union men were repulsed, and had several narrow escapes from capture. At Olustee, Florida, the battery in which Mr. Shull was serving was ordered to retreat. He was stunned, and could not move until the rebels were within two hundred yards of him. He then ran, and, although called upon to halt and hearing the bullets whistle by him, he made his escape. This was but one of several narrow escapes from death and capture. He was detailed in Florida to assist in destroying the railroad, and had some skirmishes with the rebels. While in camp in Virginia, he once went out with a comrade for pistol practice. They found a calf, killed and dressed it and took it into camp, but others enjoyed the feast, and they spent several uncomfortable days in the guard house. After three years of active life in the army Mr. Shull was discharged in front of Petersburg, September 13, 1864. He was born at Bedford, Pennsylvania, March 7, 1835, a son of Jacob and Polly (Russell) Shull. In his native town he married, June 1, 1856, Elizabeth Corl, born in Bedford, August 30, 1841, the daughter of John S. and Rebecca (Ickes) Corl. Their children were born: Isaac, October 11, 1857; Abraham Lincoln, November 13, 1861, died March 12, 1864; Elizabeth, March 14, 1868, died March 27, 1868; Mary Myrtle, April 2, 1869; Ida C., December 5, 1871; and George Franklin, January 10, 1874. Mr. Shull is a laborer and lives at Gibsonburg, Ohio .

Jacob T. Shuman

Is the son of a soldier, his father having served in the war of 1812. When the war of the Rebellion broke out he did what he could to aid the good cause. He sent two strong, young sons to swell the ranks of the Union army. The elder, Amos C., was but sixteen years of age when he enlisted. He served through the war, being wounded three times, and taking part in thirteen regular engagements. He returned home wrecked in health and died from disease consequent upon the severe exposures and hardships of his life in the service. In 1864, the second son of Mr. Shuman to enter the service, William D., was fifteen years old and enlisted, taking his place in the ranks with patriotism and youthful ambition. In a short time, however, he was attacked by fever, and sent home, only to live three short weeks. Jacob T. Shuman was born in Guernsey County, Ohio, October 2, 1815, a son of James and Catherine (Woolferd) Shuman, both now deceased. He married in Sandusky County, Ohio, November 18, 1841, Rebecca A. Solomon. Mrs. Shuman was born in Wayne County, Ohio, November 20, 1823, the daughter of David and Catherine (Kenedy) Solomon. Many children have blessed their home, some of whom are now separated from them by death. Their children were born: Chester P., September 11, 1843; Amos C, May 16, 1846, died February 3, 1868; William D., July 3, 1849, died July 31, 1865. Lyman E., April 15, 1852; infant son, May 10, 1854, died May 20, 1854; Sarah C., August 29, 1855, resides in Seneca County; Annie Jane and Emma Jane, July 22, 1859; Edith Etta, November 12, 1861, died February 13, 1877; Kirby I.N., November 18, 1865; Henry F. D., June 28, 1869. The first wife of Jacob T. Shuman was Elizabeth Sprout. The children of this marriage were: Presley T., born April 13, 1836, and Mary E., March 6, 1841. Mr. and Mrs. Shuman are among the earliest settlers of Sandusky County, where they still live as honored citizens.

John T. Sivalls

Became a member of Company L, 3d Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. He enlisted as a private, in December, 1863, and was promoted to sergeant in 1864, for duties well performed and on account of his abilities as a drill master. Mr. Sivalls participated, with his regiment, in two battles and several skirmishes. He served his country during twenty-two months, and was honorably discharged at the close of the war. In 1846 Mr. Sivalls enlisted in the United States regular army and served in the Mexican war. He was engaged in the battle of Buena Vista, and, although quite young to be a soldier, he was promoted to the rank of corporal for good conduct. He entered the army at New York City, and was discharged at New Orleans, Louisiana, August 31, 1848. Mr. Sivalls was born in New York City, August 22, 1828. His parents, both now deceased, were Jarvis and Cornelia (Lewis) Sivalls. He married, in Wood County, Ohio, Mary Truax, born in Pennsylvania, September, 1830, the daughter of Stillwell and Sarah (Hart) Truax, both now deceased. The three children first born to Mr. Sivalls, Abner, Benson and Caroline A., are now deceased. Four sons and one daughter, Stillwell, John, Mary, James and Ralph, reside at Woodville, Ohio, where Mr. Sivalls holds the office of postmaster, and is also engaged in business as agent for machines and musical instruments.

Charles Theodore Smith

October 14, 1861, entered Company F, of the 2d Michigan Cavalry, enlisting at Grand Rapids, Michigan, as a private. The regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 2d division, Army of the Cumberland . Mr. Smith acted as commissary sergeant after March, 1864, till the close of the war. He was present and actively engaged with his regiment in the battle of New Market, siege of Corinth, Mississippi, and Iuka, Mississippi . At the battle of Pittsburg Landing he was taken sick and went home for four months. Rejoining his regiment he took part in the battles of the Peninsula, and in all of the engagements of his regiment at that time. He was a second time taken sick, and was ill two months, but recovered in time to take part in the battle of Chickamauga . He participated in the battles of Chickamauga, Danville, Mossy Creek. He then veteranized, and afterward took part in the battle of Nashville, Tennessee, which resulted in the repulse of Hood and the breaking up of his army. After that the regiment remained all winter at Waterloo . He has applied for a pension, which he has not received, and has lost his papers through the agent. Having served three years and eleven months, he was discharged at Jackson, Michigan . Mr. Smith was born in York Township, Sandusky County, Ohio, a son of David and Hannah ( Ames ) Smith. He married at Hillsdale, Michigan, December 30, 1867, Josie Phalen, born in Ireland, in 1847, the daughter of James and Mary (Murphy) Phalen. Their children were born: Frank, May 26, 1869, deceased; Frederick, June 3, 1878; Courtland, July 4, 1875; Louisa, March 15, 1877. Mr. Smith is a millwright, and resides at Bellevue, Ohio .

George W. Smith

Entered the service of his country at an early age. He enlisted February 23, 1864, at Fremont, Ohio, as a private in Company D, 3d Ohio Veteran Volunteer Cavalry. Mr. Smith took an active part in the battles of Selma, Alabama, Columbus, Georgia, and the Atlanta campaign. When Sherman started on his March to the Sea, the cavalry brigade was sent to Louisville to be remounted. There were only enough horses to mount one regiment. The 3d took them and surrounded the town, and pressed into service all the horses they could find. Sometimes they would find a horse in the house, and one was discovered in a parlor at Louisville, Kentucky . Once while on a foraging expedition Mr. Smith was lost for many hours, but finally reached his regiment in safety. During one year, five months and eleven days he served in the army, and was discharged at Edgefield, Tennessee, August 4, 1865. He is past quartermaster of Canfield Post, No. 124, G.A.R. In Bedford County, Pennsylvania, he was born, November 9, 1847, a son of John and Elizabeth (Yount) Smith.l He married, in Wabash County, Indiana, January 20, 1870, M.S. Armstrong. Mrs. Smith was born in Rockbridge County, Virginia, July 7, 1850, the daughter of C.W. and Susana (Tribbett) Armstrong. Two children have been born to them: Maud, June 18, 1874, and Vertie A., October 9, 1875. Mr. Smith is a commercial traveler, and resides at Gibsonburg, Sandusky County .

Martin C. Smith

Although quite young at the outbreak of the war of the Rebellion, enlisted in the 3d Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, then in the 72 Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and again in the 111th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Each time he was taken out of the army by his father on account of his age. In February, 1864, he enrolled his name for a fourth time among the boys in blue. He entered Company B, 189th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as a private, and received the promotion to corporal. Mr. Smith was engaged, with his regiment, at the battle of Perryville, Kentucky, and in minor skirmishes. He was detailed as wagon master for eight months, and acted as scout during eighteen months. He was assigned to special duty on foraging expeditions several times. He was discharged at Nashville, Tennessee, in October, 1865. Mr. Smith is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. He was born in Ottawa County, in the town of Genoa, November 15, 1844. His father’s name is Ira Smith. He married at Clyde, Ohio, December 14, 1865, Lovina M. Snyder. Mrs. Smith was born in Sandusky County, December 21, 1846, the daughter of Daniel Snyder. They have five children: Alice, Maud, Claud W., Mabel and Cora B. Mr. Smith now resides at Bellevue, Ohio, and carries on the business of plasterer and calsominer.

Solomon G. Smith

In the second month of the war, May 10, 1861, entered as a private, Company C, 23d Ohio Volunteer Infantry, enlisting at Cleveland, Ohio was assigned to the 3rd brigade, 2nd division, 8th army corps. He re-enlisted January 1, 1864, at Charleston, West Virginia . The first engagement of the regiment was at Carnifax Ferry, and Mr. Smith confesses to having been very much frightened. Their next encounter with the enemy was at Clarks Hollow. Here their company consisted of seventy-six men. They were in a log house, and kept the enemy, four hundred strong, at bay for two hours, firing on them from between the logs. The main force then came to their aid. Their loss was twenty-six men. During this engagement there were two women living in the house. Mr. Smith also shared, with his regiment, the battles of South Mountain, Antietam, and two engagements at Cedar Creek, besides many skirmishes of less note. At the battle of South Mountain, Maryland, he was wounded in the shoulder by a musket ball. During four years, two months and six days Mr. Smith served his country, and was discharged at Cleveland, July 26, 1865. He is a member of C.B. Gambee Post, No. 33, G.A.R. He was born in Harttleton Township, Union County, Pennsylvania, a son of Jacob and Anna ( Moore ) Smith. At Bellevue, Sandusky County, Ohio, September 11, 1867, he was united in marriage to Maggie Beckley. Mrs. Smith was born in Wayne County, Ohio, a daughter of Conrad and Susan (Smith) Beckley . They have two children, who were born: George E., December 30, 1869; Thomas Murry, November 9, 1871. Mr. Smith is a farmer, and resides near Bellevue, Ohio .

Isaiah N. Solomon

On August 16, 1862, enlisted at Fostoria, Ohio, as a private in Company K, 101st Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 1st division, 4th army corps. He was promoted to corporal for meritorious conduct. Mr. Solomon engaged with his regiment in the battles of Perryville, Kentucky, Resaca, Rocky Face Ridge, Dallas, Kingston, Kenesaw Mountain, Pumpkin Vine Creek, Bald Knob, siege of Atlanta, Jonesboro, Georgia ; Franklin and Nashville, Tennessee . At the battle of Resaca they were flanked by the enemy in the woods, and the retreat of the Union forces was down a steep bank. In going down here Mr. Solomon caught his gun on a bush and it was jerked out of his hand. He stopped as soon as he could and went back and secured his gun, though the rebels were close on him. He was grazed by several balls but returned safely to his regiment. At Huntsville, Alabama, some of the men were captured by bushwhackers. One of them escaping, the rest of the company went in search of the others. They found the rebels, but suppose they must have killed their prisoners, as they were never heard from afterward. Mr. Solomon was assigned to special duty at Fort Rosecrans . He had been in the hospital sick and his regiment had moved, when Morgan threatened a raid, and all the force that could be gathered was put in defense of the fort. After a service of three years Mr. Solomon was discharged at Nashville, Tennessee, June 16, 1865. He is a member of Powell Post, at Bettsville, Ohio . He was born in Sandusky County, Ohio, April 24, 1837, a son of David and Sarah (Bair) Solomon, both now deceased. He married at Fostoria, Ohio, June 24, 1869, Esther R. Good, born in Seneca County, Ohio, September 20, 1847, the daughter of John Good, now deceased, and Sarah (Baker) Good. Their children were born: Ernest N., January 14, 1871; Rolla W., November 8, 1873; Burton M., July 17, 1876; Arthur Ross, January 18, 1882, died October 19, 1882.

Jacob Snyder

In the first year of the war enlisted at Woodville, Ohio, as a private in Company E, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 13th army corps. At Memphis, Tennessee, in 1862, Mr. Snyder was promoted to corporal and afterward to sergeant, and in 1864 he re-enlisted at Columbus, Ohio, entering the same company as sergeant. He engaged with his regiment in their various encounters with the enemy. At the siege of Corinth, Mississippi, in July, 1862, he was wounded through the hand by a minie-ball, causing the loss of one finger. Near Guntown, Mississippi, June 12, 1864, Mr. Snyder was taken prisoner. He was confined in Andersonville prison for five months, and was then removed to Savannah, thence to Laudon. In two months he was sent to Salisbury, North Carolina, via Florence, thence to Goldsboro, and was here paroled. Twenty members of Company E were captured at the same time as Mr. Snyder, and but seven survived the hardships and privations of the prison life. On the 15th of April, 1865, Mr. Snyder was discharged at Columbus, Ohio . He was engaged in the service of his country for more than three years. He is a member of Post No. 161, G.A.R. He was born at Liverpool, Medina County, April 2, 1838. His father was Adam Snyder, and is now deceased. His mother is Margaret Snyder. In Woodville, Ohio, January 1, 1868, he was united in marriage to Catherine Keil. Mrs. Snyder was born at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, September 17, 1848, the daughter of Jonas and Elizabeth (Johnsmayer) Keil. They have three children, who were born: J.C., June 21, 1870; Edward F., October 23, 1878, and Henry J., August 8, 1880. Mr. Snyder resides at Woodville, where he is a miller and an engineer.

Samuel A. J. Snyder

Answered the first call for soldiers, and enlisted at Fremont, Ohio, in April, 1861. He entered Company F, 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as a private. In September, 1861, he re-enlisted and was commissioned 2d lieutenant of Company C, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was detailed as recruiting officer. He was promoted to the captaincy of his company December 12, 1862, and served with distinction in this capacity until April 15, 1864. He was then, on the death of Major Eugene Rawson, commissioned major of his regiment. For meritorious and faithful service in the field, Major Snyder received from President Andrew Johnson the rank of lieutenant colonel by brevet, March 13, 1865. He engaged in the battles of Shiloh, Tennessee, siege of Corinth, Jackson, the forty-seven days series of skirmishes and engagements before Vicksburg, the second battle of Jackson, Brandon, Guntown, where a part of his regiment were taken prisoners, and Tishomingo Creek, all in Mississippi. In the last named battle Major Rawson was killed. Major Snyder also participated in the battles of Nashville, Tennessee, under General Thomas, and at Spanish Fort, Alabama . He ended a military life of four years and five months September 14, 1865, when he was discharged at Columbus, Ohio . He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. Mr. Snyder was born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, March 38, 1836, the son of Samuel and Mary Ann (Bennett) Snyder. He married at Goshen, Indiana, September 25, 1863, Clementine Cregar. Mrs. Snyder was born in Seneca County, Ohio January 29, 1843, the daughter of Jacob and Margaret (Shank) Cregar. Their only daughter, Laura Louisa, was born September 14, 1864. The first wife of Mr. Snyder was Margaret (Cregar) Snyder. Three children were born to them: Calvin C., Emma and Nellie; the two last named are now deceased. Major Snyder was appointed postmaster by President Grant, and held the office from December 17, 1873, until April 1, 1877, at Fremont, Ohio, where he still resides.

Henry G. Stahl

April 24, 1861, enlisted in the defense of his country at Fremont, Ohio . He enrolled in Company G. 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as a private. On September 10th of the same year he re-enlisted at Fremont, and entered Company D, 3d Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, as bugler. Mr. Stahl was actively engaged in the battles of Shiloh, Tennessee, the siege of Corinth, Mississippi ; Perryville, Kentucky ; Stone River, Tullahoma, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Farmington, Knoxville, and through the Atlanta campaign to Jonesboro, Georgia . He was assigned to special duty at regimental, brigade and division headquarters. At the end of three years and seven months of well performed duties as soldier, he was discharged at Columbia, Tennessee, October 3, 1864. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. Mr. Stahl was born in Sandusky County, Ohio, March 12, 1843, a son of John C. and Charlotte (Michel) Stahl. At Fremont, on February 6, 1878, he married Minnie Horton. He is now engaged in business as a commission merchant at Fremont, Ohio .

John Steel

Enlisted at Camp Chase, Columbus, Ohio, in June, 1861. He entered as a private Company G, 25th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 2d division, 11th army corps. He re-enlisted at Folly Island, South Carolina, entering the same company. The first engagement of the regiment was at Bull Run, which was a very severe battle. At Gettysburg they had the most sharply contested engagement of the war. They were in very close quarters and lost many men. Mr. Steel was also actively engaged in the battles of Bull Pasture Mountain, Culpeper Court House, second Bull Run, and at Cheat Mountain, where Lee surrounded the army, but they fought their way out. He was in many skirmishes, and had an encounter with the enemy at Pocataligo, West Virginia . At the battle of Gettysburg he received a wound through the leg. Long and well he served his country, being discharged at the end of four years at Camp Chase, in June, 1866. He was born in Livingston County, New York, September 17, 1827, a son of Harry and Anna (Poats) Steel. He married at Green Springs, Ohio, in September 1881, Jennie Stewart. The first wife of Mr. Steel was Nancy A. Harris. By this marriage there was one son, George, born January 19, 1870, now residing in Hancock County, Ohio . Mr. Steel is a laborer, and resides at Clyde, Ohio .

Winfield Scott Stevens


Joined the ranks of the boys in blue at Tiffin, Ohio, August 12, 1861. He enlisted as a private in Company E, 49th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. His regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 3d division, 4th army corps. On the 8th of March, 1862, Mr. Stevens was promoted to the rank of corporal. He engaged with his regiment in the battles of Dog Walk, Shiloh, Tennessee, and Stone River, Tennessee . At the battle of Stone River, December 31, 1862, he was wounded and taken prisoner. He was held at Murfreesboro for five days. During one year and nine months he served his country with true soldierly courage, and was discharged at Nashville, Tennessee, May 14, 1863. Mr. Stevens is present post commander of Lewis Baker Post, No. 172, G.A.R. He was born at Melmore, Ohio, March 8, 1843, a son of James M. and Martha (Chamberlin) Stevens. At Elmore, Ohio, June 25, 1868, he married Eunecia B. Hull. Mrs. Stevens was born in Sandusky County, Ohio, January 30, 1847, the daughter of Trustrum and Sarah (Canfield) Hull . Two sons have been born to them, both of whom are now separated from them by death.
The eldest was born and died January 21, 1872, and Alfred Brownell, born September 17, 1880, died July 9, 1881. Mr. Stevens is railroad agent and telegraph operator at Lindsey, Ohio .

Thomas D. Stevenson

Enlisted at Tiffin, Ohio, in Company A, 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, for the three months service. He entered Company I, 3d Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, September 24, 1861, at Monroeville, Ohio . He was promoted to sergeant for meritorious services. At the battle of Stone River the 3d Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, of which he was then a member, made a charge and engaged in a hand to hand conflict. Mr. Stevenson received a wound in the knee with a sabre, and a bayonet wound in the thigh. He remained with his command for several days after the battle, and then being taken sick was sent to the hospital at Nashville, from whence he was discharged on account of disability, after he had been in the service two years and three months. September 15, 1863, at Green Springs, Mr. Stevenson re-enlisted in the 9th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. He was commissioned saddler-sergeant of the regiment. With his regiment he served in Alabama and Tennessee until attached to Sherman ’s army in Georgia . He took part in the March to the Sea and the campaign of the Carolinas in 1865. He was discharged, at the close of the war, July 20, 1865. He made an application for a pension, but there was so much red tape about the business that he abandoned it. He is a member of Canfield Post, No. 124, G.A.R. In Green Creek Township, Sandusky County, Ohio, he was born November 18, 1841. His parents, both now deceased, wee David and Nancy (Madden) Stevenson. He married at Freeport, Ohio, September 18, 1870, Rosetta A. Fowler, born at Milan, Erie County, Ohio, September 11, 1853, the daughter of Amos D. and Castaria T. (Smeed) Fowler, the former deceased. Their children were born: Thomas B., April 17, 1872; Amos C., March 25, 1874; Ray D., April 29, 1880; Edson M., August 17, 1882. Mr. Stevenson was admitted to the bar in the district court April 6, 1877. He has been justice of the peace for thirteen years. In October, 1884, he was elected clerk of Sandusky County for the term of three years. He resides at Fremont, Ohio .

William Stevenson

Enrolled as a soldier in August, 1861, at Tiffin, Ohio . He enlisted as a private in Company B, 49th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 2d division, 15th army corps. Mr. Stevenson engaged with his regiment in the battle of Pittsburg Landing, Tennessee . When they arrived on the battlefield the rebels had the Union forces under the bank of the river. They soon crossed the river and the advantage was on their side. During this engagement Mr. Stevenson was wounded through the left shoulder, and has, in consequence, been unfitted for manual labor since that time. His next encounter with the enemy was at the hard fought battle of Stone River, Tennessee . He was taken prisoner during this battle, and held in Libby prison for two months. Those were the hardest days of his life, and the happiest day was that on which he was paroled. Three years and two months he served his country and was discharged at Atlanta, Georgia, in October, 1864. His brother Joseph was a member of Company A, 111th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was taken sick while on duty at Knoxville, Tennessee, and died. William Stevenson was born in Sandusky County, Ohio, January 5, 1843, a son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Reinig) Stevenson. He married at Fremont, Ohio, Ella Keifer. Mrs. Stevenson was born in Sandusky County, Ohio, in 1848, the daughter of Michael and Filinda (Morrell) Keifer. They have one daughter, Maggie Bell, born December 3, 1871. Mr. Stevenson is a farmer and resides near Clyde, Ohio .

Russel Z. Sturtevant

Enlisted at Clyde, Ohio, January 5, 1864, as a private in Company A, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was at that time a part of the 1st brigade, 1st division, 16th army corps. Mr. Sturtevant was one of the unfortuante participators in the battle of Guntown, Mississippi, but in his next engagement with the enemy at Tupelo, he was on the side of victory. He was actively engaged in the battle of Memphis, Tennessee, September 1, 1864, and then at Nashville, Tennessee . He also took part in the siege at Spanish Fort. After siege of Spanish Fort was detailed in division hospital to take care of the wounded and sick; was on this duty until July 18, 1865, then came home on sick furlough. While on the Guntown expedition he received a sunstroke, June 11, 1864. After a service of twenty one months, he was discharged at Columbus, Ohio, September 19, 1865. He is a member of Eaton Post, No. 55, G.A.R. His son, Warren L., was a member of Company A, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was taken prisoner during the stampede at Guntown and held at Andersonville prison, where he died of starvation September 8, 1864. A brother of Mr. Sturtevant belonged to Company C, 24th New York Volunteer Infantry. He died in the army. Russel Sturtevant was born at Henderson, New York, October 19, 1823, a son of Charles and Hannah (Atwell) Sturtevant. He married at Adams, New York, December 3, 1844, Antoinette Sturtevant, born at Ellisburgh, New York, February 11, 1825, the daughter of Luin and Sylvia ( Warren ) Sturtevant.
Their children were born: Warren L., May 7, 1846, died in the army; Ellen, September 26, 1848, lives near Clyde; Charles, August 15, 1851, lives in York Township, Sandusky County, Ohio; Melissa, December 25, 1854; Mary Ann, January 26, 1857, lived in Kansas and died September 17, 1884; Manfred, August 8, 1860; Clara, June 12, 1863, lives in Wood County; Alice D., January 5, 1867; and Spencer B., July 5, 1870. Mr. Sturtevant was disabled in the army and is now unable to work. His post office address is Clyde, Ohio

James L. Tindall

Enlisted at Fremont, Ohio, August 22, 1862. He entered Company A. 111th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as 3d corporal and was promoted 1st corporal by grade. The regiment was assigned to the 2d brigade, 2d division, 23d army corps. Mr. Tindall engaged in the battles of Stone River, Huffs Ferry, Knoxville, Strawberry Plains, Rocky Face Ridge, Resaca, Dallas, Burnt Hickory, Pine Mountain, Kenesaw Mountain, Peachtree Creek, Atlanta, Lovejoy Station, Columbia, Franklin and Fort Anderson, besides many skirmishes and encounters of less note. He was detailed to special duty at headquarters in command of the brigade pioneer corps for one year. When near Columbia, Tennessee, the army met the rebel column and Colonel Moore told Mr. Tindall to turn the baggage wagons back. He did so, and at Spring Hill was jammed into the great stampede. They escaped, however, with the loss of a part of the baggage, and with bruised and aching limbs. At Raleigh, North Carolina, on April 14, 1865, while foraging with three comrades, he was taken prisoner. One of his companions was instantly killed and the other three were marched through an almost barren country. Their guard was fired upon by Kilpatrick’s men and were compelled to ford Cape Fear river under a heavy fire. The first night on this march they spent in an old gin mill and received nothing to eat until the end of the next day’s march. On the third night they attempted to make their escape, but were recaptured and badly treated until they reached their prison at Salisbury, North Carolina . Here they were confined twenty days and were then sent, under a flag of truce, to Durham Station, Kilpatrick’s headquarters. Mr. Tindall served his country faithfully and well for three years, and was discharged June 7, 1865. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. Mr. Tindall is a past grand in Maple Lodge, No. 700, I.O.O.F. He is also a member of the Knights of Honor, No. 752, and past protector in the Esther Lodge, No. 278, Knights and Ladies of Honor. These lodges are all located at Bettsville, Seneca county, Ohio . Three brothers of Mrs. Tindall served in the war. William L. Fields enlisted August 14, 1862, in Company A, 12th Kansas Infantry, and was discharged June 20, 1865. He was born May 18, 1842, died April 22, 1877. John S. was in three months service and re-enlisted in Company F, 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was killed at the battle of Antietam . His birth occurred February 26, 1839. James W. born January 9, 1845, was a member of the Ohio National Guards, and died of camp fever at Washington, District of Columbia, July 9, 1864. James L. Tindall was born in Ballville township, Sandusky county, Ohio May 4, 1839, a son of Edward and Evaline (Hafford) Tindall. He married in Sandusky county, November 20, 1860, Martha J. Fields. Mrs. Tindall was born at Fremont, Ohio, August 26, 1836, the daughter of William and Sarah ( Moore ) Fields. Four children have been born to them: Eva M. September 7, 1861; Clara L., May 4, 1866, died August 23, 1868; Blanch I., September 29, 1874; and Edward F., January 21, 1880. Mr. Tindall is a farmer and resides near Fremont, Ohio .

Samuel Transue

First enlisted in the three months service at Easton, Pennsylvania, as a member of Company H, 1st Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. He re-enlisted at Easton, and was enrolled as a private in Company E, 47th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. At his first enlistment the regiment was organized at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania . The men drew haversacks, canteens, guns and ammunition, and without uniforms started South. They made few stops before reaching the Shenandoah Valley where they remained until the expiration of their term of service. On re-enlistment, Mr. Transue joined his regiment at Buford, South Carolina . He remained here some time on guard duty and drilling, and then went to Key West, Florida . From Key West Company E, with five other companies, was sent to Dry Tortugas, where they remained a year and were principally employed on guard duty. They then went via New Orleans to Baton Rouge, and after a short time to Shreveport . Here some of the officers asked the men to sign papers refusing to go further, but the men preferred to enter the engagement with General Banks. During this battle many comrades of Mr. Transue were killed or wounded. The Union army retreated to Morganza Bend, burning everything on their route. Mr. Transue was attacked by chronic diarrhea and sent to the hospital at New Orleans for two months. At the end of this time he returned home on a furlough and rejoined his regiment nine months later at Winchester, Virginia . After the surrender of Lee and the assassination of President Lincoln, he went to Camp Brightwood near Washington, District of Columbia, and performed guard duty until he was discharged at the close of the war. During his three years and three months of service Mr. Transue was engaged in the battles of Pocataligo, Shreveport, Louisiana ; Winchester, and many skirmishes of minor importance. He was born at Easton, Pennsylvania, September 5, 1832, a son of Jacob I. and Polly (Root) Transue. He married in Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, Henrietta (Cawley) Keiber, born in that county, February 13, 1832, the daughter of Jacob and Susan (Shiner) Keiber. Their only daughter, Annie, was born July 24, 1869. The first wife of Mr. Transue was Celia Cooper Their son William was born March, 1863, and resides with his grandparents in Pennsylvania . Mr. Transue is a carpenter and resides at Lindsey, Ohio .

John Tuckerman

August 17, 1862, entered the army at Fremont, Ohio . He enrolled in Company G, 111th Ohio Volunteer Infantry as a private. The regiment was assigned to the 2d brigade, 2d division, 23d army corps. For meritorious conduct Mr. Tuckerman was promoted to corporal at Knoxville, Tennessee, in January, 1863. He engaged with his regiment in the raid after John Morgan, then on the famous march across the Cumberland mountains, and participated in the battles of Huffs Ferry, Campbell Station, siege of Knoxville, Strawberry Plains, Buzzards Roost, Dalton, Resaca, Burnt Hickory, Lovejoy Station, Peachtree Creek, Kenesaw Mountain, siege of Atlanta, Franklin, Nashville, Fort Fisher, and many others of more or less importance. At one time Company G was detailed to guard a train of cars from Bowling Green to Nashville . While en route the train fell through a bridge and Mr. Tuckerman’s leg was broken at the ankle. This injury unfitted him for duty for three months, but he rejoined his company at the end of that time. While in the Georgia campaign Mr. Tuckerman was on the skirmish line and engaged with the enemy in very close quarters. He and a rebel contended for the same tree, both demanding the surrender of the other. The rebel made a charge but by running around the tree Mr. Tuckerman got in the rear of him and captured him. At the end of a three years service he was discharged at Salisbury, North Carolina, in July, and mustered out at Cleveland, Ohio, August 7, 1865. He was born in Seneca county, Ohio, December 17, 1839, a son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Brown) Tuckerman. He married in Sandusky county, Ohio, January 18, 1873, Monica Bradshaw, born in Sandusky county, Ohio, September 17, 1850, the daughter of Louis and Ellen (Lapoint) Bradshaw. Their children were born: John M., September 29, 1874; Inez E., July 18, 1876; Ezra E., August 16, 1880; Oliver P., September 19, 1882; Octavo was born September 21, 1878, and is now deceased. Mr. Tuckerman is engaged in the cultivation of a farm near Fremont, Ohio .

James W. Underhill

Left the comforts of home to enlist in the ranks of the Union army. He enrolled at Cardington, Morrow county, Ohio, December 21, 1862, as a private in Company K, 128th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was in camp at Cleveland, Ohio, during the first winter engaged in the performance of guard duty and drilling. They were then sent to Johnsons Island, Lake Erie, as guard to the prisoners there. While there, one night fourteen rebels made their escape and crossed Sandusky Bay into Ottawa county. Company K was sent in pursuit and crossed the ice expecting every moment to break through. They returned with the prisoners, however. Sometimes there were as many as two thousand prisoners on the island. They were held in good barracks, with plenty of fire and food, and were quite as comfortable as the men who guarded them. Mr. Underhill performed his duty as a faithful soldier for two years, six months and twenty-one days, and was discharged at Columbus, Ohio, July 13, 1865. He was born at Chesterville, Morrow county, Ohio, November 1, 1837. His parents are John and Mary ( Wilson ) Underhill. He married, at Cardington, Ohio, October 29, 1859, Judith Click, born in Fairfield county, May 2, 1838, the daughter of Andrew and Sarah (Alspach) Click. Their three children were born: Eudora, September 18, 1860; now resides in Gibsonburg, Ohio ; Olley, August 10, 1863, died August 16, 1864, and Charles W., August 31, 1866. Mr. Underhill resides near Gibsonburg, Ohio, on his farm which he is occupied in cultivating.

Adam Vallance

Entered the Union army at McGregors Landing, Iowa, March 5, 1864. He enlisted as a private in Company K, 7th Iowa Volunteer Cavalry. The regiment was sent west to encounter the Indians. Mr. Vallance was actively engaged in two battles on the plains, and was present when General Custer was killed. He was taken sick in Dakota, and has applied for a pension, but has not yet received one. He also only received half of the bounty money promised on his enlistment. Two years and eight months he led the life of a soldier, and was discharged June 22, 1866, at Sioux City . He was born in Pennsylvania, April 3, 1839. His parents are Adam and Elizabeth (White) Vallance. He married in his native State in January, 1867, Arabella Miller. Mrs. Vallance was born in Pennsylvania, May 7, 1842, the daughter of Jacob and Annie (Naugle) Miller. Seven children have been born to them: John M., December 26, 1867; Aggie, May 26, 1869; Margaret, December 10, 1871; George M., June 18, 1874; Charles H. January 28, 1877; Joseph H. died at the age of seven months and twelve days; William died aged nine weeks. Mr. Vallence is engaged in the cultivation of his farm near Rollersville, Ohio .

Emanuel Walters

Enlisted at Fremont, Ohio, May 2, 1864. He enrolled as a private in Company K, 169th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was ordered to Fort Ethan Allen. While here, engaged in the performance of guard duty, Mr. Walters was attacked by chronic diarrhea. He remained with his regiment until the expiration of his term of enlistment, which was four months. At Cleveland, Ohio, he was discharged, September 2, 1864. A few days after his return home he was drafted. He did not ask to be exempt on account of disability, but sent a substitute. He has never entirely recovered from his illness, but has not applied for a pension. Mr. Walters was born in Washington township, Sandusky county, Ohio, January 24, 1836, a son of Gabriel and Mary (Reed) Walters. In his native township, April 20, 1864, he married Susanna Kline. Mrs. Walters was born in Washington township, February 14, 1847, the daughter of Christian and Catherine (Overmyer) Kline. They have five children, who were born: Mary Catherine, July 6, 1865; Wesley, April 28, 1868; Hiram, March 25, 1874; Jeremiah, April 10, 1880; and Martin, May 4, 1882. Mr. Walters is a farmer. His postoffice address is Lindsey, Sandusky county, Ohio .

Nathan Warring

Leaving his home, enlisted August 7, 1862, in the service of his country. He enrolled in Sandusky county, Ohio, as a private in Company K, 100th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 3d division, 23d army corps. Mr. Warring took an active part in the battles of Rocky Face Ridge, Resaca, Buzzards Roost, Marietta, Atlanta, Big Shanty, Nashville, and many others of more or less importance. He shared with his regiment in their marches and encounters with the enemy during three years, and was discharged at Cleveland, Ohio, in June, 1865. Mr. Warring was born in Townsend township, Sandusky county, Ohio, November 13, 1840. His parents are Ephraim and Nancy (Brooks) Warring. In his native township, on the 21st of July, 1860, he was united in marriage to Laura Scott. Mrs. Warring was born in York township, Sandusky county, Ohio, May 28, 1846, the daughter of Isaac and Sarah (Goodrich) Scott. Mr. Warring is a farmer, and also holds the office of constable. His postoffice address is Townsend, Sandusky county, Ohio .

George Welker

Entered the army from Sandusky county, Ohio . He enlisted September 10, 1861, as a private in Company D., 3d Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. Mr. Welker took part with his regiment in the battle of Corinth, Mississippi . This engagement was a very severe one, and occurred in October, 1862. Company D, to which Mr. Welker belonged, captured seven hundred rebels. Soon after this battle he was taken sick and sent to the hospital at Nashville, Tennessee . Chronic diarrhea and typhoid fever unfitted him for active service, and at the end of one year and six months he was discharged at Nashville in March, 1863. He was born in Pennsylvania, May 5, 1836. His parents are George and Mary E. (Correll) Welker. On November 11, 1864, he was united in marriage to Rebecca Keefer. Mrs. Welker was born in Pennsylvania, October 16, 1840, the daughter of George Keefer. Their children were born: Catherine, December 25, 1865, died in 1880; Willy, October 10, 1867, died in 1880; Anna, September, 1869; John, March, 1871; Henry, August, 1879; and Katie, August 10, 1881. Mr. Welker is a laborer, and lives at Clyde, Sandusky county, Ohio .

Henry Wennes

First enlisted at Findlay, Hancock county, Ohio, as a private in Company C, 57th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. His regiment was assigned to the 4th brigade, 2d division, 15th army corps. He re enlisted in the same regiment and company. The regiment was in General Sherman’s command, and was always marching. Mr. Wennes contracted rheumatism in the service, and applied for a pension about fourteen years ago. He has lately discovered that his petition has never been filed, although the agent took his five dollars commission. He has been almost unfitted for work for eighteen years, and his case should have the immediate attention of the board of pensioners. He was a soldier for three years and six months, and was discharged on account of disability at Louisville, Kentucky . He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. At Baden, Germany, he was born, a son of Christopher and Christina (Sandater) Wennes. He married at Fremont, Ohio, Catherine Buchater. Mrs. Wennes was born in Germany, the daughter of Christopher and Catherine Buchater. Their children were born: George, August 23, 1855; Simon, August 30, 1856, died in 1876; Barbara, December 2, 1857, died in 1876; and Christina, July 21, 1859. Mr. Wennes is engaged in business as a stonemason. He resides at Fremont, Ohio .

Sylvester D. West

At the first call for soldiers enlisted. He enrolled at Republic, Seneca county, Ohio, April 23, 1861, as a private in Company K, 7th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. In May, 1864, he re-enlisted, entering Company K, 164th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Mr. West did not participate in any battle, as he was appointed to special duty, being a blacksmith. The first service on which he was detailed did not please him, and he went back to his regiment. He was then sent to Fort Strong, and remained there until the fort was finished. He was then ordered to Fort Smith to drill in artillery. He was gunner of one of the best squads of artillery to be found. While in the performance of his duty here he was injured in the back by attempting to lift a piece of artillery. He has since suffered from lumbago of the back and kidneys. At the end of a service of more than one year he was discharged at Cleveland, Ohio, August 20, 1864. In Eaton Post, No. 55, G.A.R., Mr. West is past commander. He was born in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, December 17, 1838, a son of David and Christina (Jeffreys) West. He married at Republic, Ohio, July 8, 1861, Salina Jane Alcott, born at Tiffin, Ohio, December 17, 1838, a daughter of James and Elizabeth Alcott. Their children were born: Rosa Emma, May 19, 1862, deceased; Morris Wellington, July 28, 1864; Alice Rosetta, July 28, 1865; Ida Bell, May 20, 1867; Frank, August 22, 1870; an infant son, April 20, 1879, died May 28, 1879. Mr. West follows the trade of a blacksmith. He resides at Clyde, Ohio .

Henry Whiteman

Enlisted in Seneca county, Ohio, September 16, 1864, as a private in Company I, 33d Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry. He was engaged in three hard fought battles, and during nearly three months was constantly in a series of skirmishes of more or less note. He was with Sherman on the March to the Sea, and at the bombardment of Fort McAllister, the 33d was exposed to an enfilading fire, and consequently suffered greatly. At Goldsboro and Savannah the battles were very severe. At Milledgeville, Georgia, Mr. Whiteman was taken prisoner and held a short time, when, seeing a good opportunity to escape, he knocked down the guard and rejoined his regiment. He was detailed as wardmaster at Savannah, Georgia, in January, 1865, and in three weeks went to the 14th corps hospital. From here he was sent, in three weeks, to the general hospital, and, although far from well, he rejoined his regiment at the end of two weeks more. During ten months he served his country as a brave and faithful soldier. He was discharged at Washington, District of Columbia, June 15, 1865. He is a member of Eaton Post, No. 55 G.A.R., and holds the office of officer of the guard. He was born in Seneca county, Ohio, June 21, 1839, a son of Benjamin and Catherine (Bartgis) Whiteman. In his native county he married Annie Heckman, on the 27th of April, 1864. Mrs. Whiteman was born in Pennsylvania, January 3, 1847, the daughter of Henry and Isabella (Deywalt) Heckman. They have one daughter, Rosa Belle, born March 20, 1865. Mr. Whiteman is engaged in business as a butcher, and resides at Clyde, Ohio .

George F. Williams

During the first month of the war, April, 1861, enlisted as a private in Company F, 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, at Fremont, Ohio . He joined the regiment at Camp Taylor, Cleveland, Ohio, and went with it to Camp Dennison, where he remained until the expiration of his term of service. Mr. Williams re-enlisted at Fremont, in July, 1861, and was mustered into Company D, 3d Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, September 10, 1861, at Monroeville, Ohio . He was elected 2d lieutenant by the members of his company. While on detached service with Hazen’s brigade, Mr. Williams was wounded in the right arm at Reedyville, Tennesee, March 17, 1863. This wound disabled him from duty for two months. With the exception of this absence from his regiment, he participated in all of their marches and engagements with the enemy, from the time they left Jeffersonville, Indiana, in March, 1862, until they were mustered out of service. In November, 1863, he was assigned to Company F, 3d Ohio Volunteer Calvalry, and at Charleston, Tennessee, Janurary 4, 1864, he veteranized, entering that company to serve during the war. After three years and seven months of active service he was mustered out at Louisville, Kentucky, November 22, 1864. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No 32, G.A.R. Joseph A. Williams, brother of George F., enlisted at Fremont, in June, 1861, as a private in Company G, 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He returned to his home, at Fremont, on a sick fulough, and died there, November 29, 1862. Gilbert J. Williams, another brother, entered Company F, 169th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, at Fremont, in August 6, 1864, as a corporal. He died at Washington, District of Columbia, August 6, 1864, of typhoid pneumonia. George F. Williams was born at Fremont, December 19, 1839, the son of Ammi Williams and Nancy J. ( Tracy ) Williams. He married, at Fremont, October 26, 1869, Elizabeth Purdy, born in Sandusky county, February 29, 1844, the daughter of John B. and Sarah (Brunthaver) Purdy. Their two children were born: Ethel, July 18, 1875; and Ebert, March 10, 1877, died March 7, 1880. Mr. Williams is a dealer in granite and marble, at Fremont, Ohio .

Anthony Young

A native of France, enlisted in the army of his adopted country October 12, 1861, at Fremont, Ohio . He entered Company H, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as 2d lieutenant, and was promoted to 1st lieutenant. On the battle field of Shiloh, Tennessee, he was made captain of his company. The regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 1st division, 14th, 15th, 16th army corps, respectively. Mr. Young participated in the battles of Fort Henry and Shiloh, Tennessee ; the siege of Corinth, Mississippi ; Grand Gulf, Port Gibson, two encounters at Jackson, Mississippi, the siege of Vicksburg, Mississippi, where they were engaged for about two months, Yazoo River and Black River, besides many minor engagements and skirmishes. During a charge in the rear of Vicksburg, Mr. Young was badly ruptured, from the effects of which he still suffers. He is also troubled with rheumatism and asthma, contracted in the service. Being attacked with chronic diarrhea, and totally unfitted for duty, he thought best to resign at the end of two years and seven months, and give others an opportunity for promotion. He received his discharge at Black river, Mississippi, July 23, 1863. In Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R., he holds the office of present commander. He was born in Alsace, France, now Germany, January 17, 1829, a son of Sebastian and Rosa (Lutz) Young. He married, at Buffalo, New York, November 26, 1850, Barbara Pfeffen, who was born at Buffalo, September 18, 1831, the daughter of Casper and Gertrude (Bimline) Pfeffen. They have a family of ten children, who were born: Anne V. and Mary, August 10, 1851, now deceased; Rosa Emeline, August 26, 1852; Helen Madorie, July 21, 1855; Robert Edward, February 21, 1858; Lucy Mary, March 21, 1861; Albert, March 21, 1865; Casper Anthony, November 19, 1868; Frank Joseph, November 9, 1870; Louis Phillip, September 8, 1873. Mr. Young is the proprietor of a hotel at Fremont, Ohio .

William M.V. Young

Enlisted at Orland, Indiana, May 20, 1863. He enrolled as a private in Company I, 9th Michigan Volunteer Cavalry. Mr. Young took part in the engagement at Lebanon, Kentucky, on July 4, 1863. While making a charge in this battle, to cut off the retreat of the enemy, he cut his hand with a rebel sabre. Fifty rebel prisoners were taken, but part of them escaped. Mr. Young was injured near Zanesville, Ohio, while trying to capture the rebel John Morgan. The 9th was making a charge and opened their ranks to allow an artillery battery to pass through, when Mr. Young’s horse fell on him, dislocating a bone of his foot. This bone was never put back in its place. Mr. Young was detailed on special duty as sergeant in charge of sixteen men and four wagons, on a foraging expedition. They went two miles beyond the picket line, and, on starting back with the wagons loaded with corn, they heard the enemy coming. They retreated into the woods, but as the rebels passed they fired on them and drove them back, and took three prisoners. From their prisoners they learned that the enemy numbered fifty. Mr. Young was in the army about three months and one-half. He was discharged at Cincinnati, Ohio, August 23, 1863. He is a member of Lewis Baker Post, No. 172, G.A.R., and is past chaplain of the post. In Crawford county, Ohio, he was born, October 23, 1846, a son of George and Savena (Sinn) Young. He married, at Adrian, Seneca county, Ohio, August 28, 1873, Lucinda Snyder. Mrs. Young was born in Seneca county, Ohio, April 3, 1848, the daughter of Williams and Sarah (Heller) Snyder. They have one daughter, born September 3, 1878, and named Sarah E. M. Young. Mr. Young is a carpenter, and resides at Lindsey, Ohio .

John C. Younkman

Enlisted at Fremont, Ohio, March 19, 1864. He enrolled as a private in Company F, 72d Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry, and found his regiment in service in the 1st brigade, 1st division, 16th army corps. Mr. Younkman engaged in the battles of Tishomingo Creek, Mississippi, where his regiment lost two hundred and forty-four men; Tupelo, Old Town Creek, Abbeville, Mississippi ; Little Harpeth, Tennessee ; Spanish Fort, Alabama ; Nashville, Tennessee, and Mobile, Alabama . He was at one time detailed as teamster, at Eastport, Mississippi, after the battle of Nashville, Tennessee . He remained on this duty about two weeks, and then rejoined his regiment, and served with them until the close of the war. With the exception of one week, during which he was in the hospital, sick with the chronic diarrhea, he entered into all of the skirmishes, battles and sieges of his company. He served one year and six months, and was discharged at Vicksburg, Mississippi, September 11, 1865. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. Philip Mathia, a brother of Mrs. Younkman, was a member of the 111th Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry. He served his country almost three years, and was honorably discharged. He died in December, 1875, of consumption, contracted in the service. John Younkman was born in Stark county, Ohio, June 16, 1845, the son of John and Mary M. (Swinehart) Younkman. He married, at Fremont, Ohio, May 8, 1866, Christina Mathia, born at Fremont, December 26, 1844, the daughter of Nicholas and Ursula (Wohlberger) Mathia. Four sons and two daughters were born to them, as follows: John William, December 29, 1866; Frank Edgar, September 3, 1868; Lillie May, November 2, 1872; Gideon Flavel, December 18, 1875; Lottie Ward, November 14, 1878; James Garfield, October 25, 1881. Mr. Younkman is a stone cutter, and resides at Fremont, Ohio .

Josiah Zimmerman

On the 12th of August, 1861, enlisted as a private in Company E, 49th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He enrolled at Fostoria, Ohio, and the regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 1st division, 4th army corps. January 1, 1864, he veteranized at Chattanooga, Tennessee . At the battle of Dallas, Georgia, May 27, 1864, Mr. Zimmerman was wounded. A minie ball struck him in front of the left ear, and, passing through his mouth, cut his tongue nearly in two. He lay on the field some time, as he was supposed to be dead. At last they removed him to the hospital, where the surgeons pronounced his case a hopeless one. For four weeks he lingered between life and death, and it was two months before he could speak so that any one could understand him. His speech is still somewhat affected by his wound. He receives eight dollars a month pension. After faithfully serving his country for four years and four months he was discharged, at Johnsons Island, Ohio, in November, 1865. He was born in Knox county, Ohio, October 5, 1842, a son of Adam and Maria (Mathias) Zimmerman. In Sandusky county, Ohio, March 6, 1866, he married Elsie A. Brion, born in Ohio, a daughter of John and Lucinda (Geralds) Brion. They have three children, who were born: Charles F., February 11, 1868; Hattie M., June 18, 1871; and Ervin A., March 22, 1878. Mr. Zimmerman was elected justice of the peace in October, 1880, and re-elected in 1883. He is engaged in farming and getting out logs and lumber. His postoffice address is Kansas, Seneca county, Ohio .

Lewis Zimmerman

A native of Germany, enlisted in the army of his adopted country at Fremont, Ohio . He entered Company F, 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as a private, June 7, 1861. He was promoted to the rank of corporal, and was discharged February 16, 1863. Re-enlisted into Company E, 25th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry first went to Wheeling, West Virginia, and then to Alexandria . Mr. Zimmerman, engaged, with his company, in the battles of Winchester and Alexandria, Virginia, and Antietam, Maryland . Here, on September 17, 1862, he received a wound which deprived him of the use of his arm for some time. He was in the hospital at Frederick City, Maryland, for two days, then transferred to Philadelphia, remaining two months, then at Alexandria one month, then to Georgetown, District of Columbia, where he was discharged in February, 1863. He was honorably discharged from the 25th at Camp Dennison, Ohio, June 20, 1865. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R.. Peter Weillnau, brother of Mrs. Zimmerman, died in the service, at Alexandria, Virginia, of typhoid fever. Mr. Zimmerman was born in Germany, February 7, 1819, a son of George and Elizabeth (Heiman) Zimmerman. He married in Germany, December 25, 1852, Margaret Weillnau, who was born in Germany, December 16, 1827, a daughter of Peter and Elizabeth (Mauser) Weillnau. They have two children, who were born: Lewis P., June 23, 1853; Minnie, December 28, 1866. Anna Burger, a daughter of John Burger, was the first wife of Mr. Zimmerman, and died in Germany . Their children were: William, who lives with his father, and Elizabeth, who lives in Strasburg, France . Mr. Zimmerman is an honored citizen in the community in which he resides. His occupation is that of a painter, at Fremont, Ohio.