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Hardesty Sandusky County, Civil War Sketches1885 A-P
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Sandusky County, Ohio Civil War Soldiers
African American Civil War Soldiers of Sandusky County
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Two Medal of Honor Winners by L. Keith Snipes
Sandusky County, Ohio Examinations for Disability Exemptions, 1862
Manville Moore Post No. 525, Fremont, Ohio, G. A. R. Personal War Sketches
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Robert H. Caldwell #439 GAR Post with Biographical Sketches and Names of Members
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Military and Personal Sketches of Ohio’s Rank and File from Sandusky County in the War of the Rebellion

Hardesty’s Historical and Geographical Encyclopedia

1885

Surnames A - P

[These sketches also include those of Sandusky County residents (1885) who enlisted elsewhere. The sketches contain minimal editing.]

Charles Able

Enlisted in Fremont, Ohio, July 28, 1862. He enrolled as a private in Company A, 111th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was promoted to sergeant in September, 1862 for meritorious services. The regiment was assigned to the 2d brigade, 2d division, 23d army corps. Mr. Able engaged in the battles of Lenoir Station, Camels Station, Knoxville, Danbridge, Strawberry Plains, and through the Georgia campaign with Sherman . He shared with his regiment in all the dangers of the battles and the hardships of the marches, never leaving his company from the time he enlisted until he was discharged. He was detailed on special duty to go with the sharp shooters, and had some very narrow escapes. In May, 1864, at Burnt Hickory, he was injured in the shoulder by the falling of the breastworks. A shell struck the log in front of him. Near Decatur, on the 8th of July, 1864, Mr. Able had a sun stroke, from which he still suffers at times. He was discharged at Salisbury, North Carolina, having been a brave and faithful soldier during three years. He was born in Licking county, Ohio, February 23, 1839, a son of William and Mary (Pierson) Able, He married at Fremont, Ohio, September 16, 1868, Charlotte M. Earl, born in Sandusky county, Ohio, November 26, 1846, the daughter of Ezriah and Maria (Bonnewaitz) Earl. They have six children, who were born: George W., January 5, 1870; Jasper W., June 3, 1872; Mary E., March 3, 1875; Susan M., July 9, 1877; Lavinnia B., December 20, 1879; Viola May, August 26, 1882. Mr. Able is a farmer and resides near Pemberville, Ohio .

Charles G. Aldrich

Answered the first call for soldiers and enlisted at Fremont, Ohio, in April, 1861, as a private in Company G, 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to Cox’s division. He engaged in the battle of Philippi, West Virginia . The Union forces were under command of General Kelly, and the Confederates under General Garnet; the latter was killed during the engagement. The regiment next encountered the enemy at Romney, West Virginia, where they made several hundred prisoners, and killed about twenty-one. The rebels were commanded by Colonel Monroe, whom, with all of his men, they soon afterward captured. August 11, 1864, Mr. Aldrich enlisted in Company A, 8th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry. In the fall of 1864, he was promoted to corporal and shortly after to sergeant. At Hatchers Run, Virginia, February 6, 1865, Mr. Aldrich was wounded by a musket ball in the right wrist. He was also shot in the left side. The bullet passed through, lodged against his hip bone of the right side, and has never been extracted. On the 4th of February, of the same year, he was taken prisoner near Petersburg . He was marched about three miles over the south side of a swamp, where the rebels halted and began to divide the money, valuables and rations of their prisoners. Just at this time, however, about three hundred boys in blue came around the swamp and recaptured their comrades, besides many prisoners and a battery. The horses of the battery were killed but the rebels lent helping, though unwilling hands to draw it back to the Union lines. During four years Mr. Aldrich served his country, and was discharged at Newark, New Jersey, June 11, 1865. He is a member of Eaton Post, No. 55, G.A.R., in which he is senior vice commander. He was born at Northbridge, Massachusetts, January 11, 1839, the son of Liberty and Mary ( Jordan ) Aldrich. He married at Sandusky City, Ohio, September 8, 1866, Phoebe E. Sweet, born May 16, 1839, the daughter of Benedict Sweet. Their children were born: Melissa A., May 11, 1867; Burton, May 7, 1876, and Barton, on the same date. An infant daughter, Mary E., died at the age of nineteen months. Mr. Aldrich is a painter and resides at Clyde, Ohio .

John T. Aldrich

Only a few days after the first gun was fired at Fort Sumter, enlisted at Bellevue, Ohio, as a private. The company was not assigned to any regiment, and he re-enlisted September 26, 1861, at Fremont, Ohio, enrolling as a private in Company A, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The first engagement of the regiment was the hard fought battle of Shiloh, Tennessee, the next the siege of Corinth, Mississippi, where the Union losses were about four thousand men. Mr. Aldrich was also engaged in the battle of Russell House, and at Jackson, Mississippi, took possession of the city. From Champion Hills to Vicksburg the regiment was in a series of engagements. Then began the siege of Vicksburg, May 18, 1863, and on the 4th of July the victorious Union army entered the surrendered city. They followed Johnston ’s army to Jackson, driving them to Brandon, thence to Brownsville, from which engagement they were forced to retreat to Vicksburg . During Mr. Aldrich’s four years, five months and eleven days of service, he experienced many severe encounters with the enemy, the most notable of which, besides those already mentioned, were the battles of Guntown, Tupelo, Oldtown Creek, where the major of the regiment was killed, the siege of Nashville, Tennessee, and the engagements of Mobile and Spanish Fort. He was discharged at Vicksburg, September 26, 1865. In Eaton Post, No. 55, G.A.R., he is past commander, and has held the office at three different times. He was born at Northbridge, Massachusetts, July 4, 1841, a son of Liberty and Mary ( Jordan ) Aldrich. He married at Tiffin, Ohio, August 6, 1866, Susan Gross, born in Pickaway county, Ohio, November 21, 1849, the daughter of David and Elizabeth (Dewitt) Gross. They have three children, born: Eddie G., October 28, 1872; Eugene M., April 22, 1875; and Clair D., January 28, 1877. Mr. Aldrich is engaged in business as a shoemaker, and resides at Clyde, Ohio .

James H. Anderson

Enlisted at Eagleville, Wood county, Ohio, July 30, 1862. He enrolled as a private in Company B, 111th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 2d division, 23d army corps. Mr. Anderson was engaged with his regiment in three skirmishes and one battle. His company was put on duty on the picket line at six o’clock P.M., at Lenoirs Station, Tennessee, with orders to remain until relieved. The rebels made them prisoners November 16th, 1863, and held them at Atlanta, Georgia, two weeks, and transported them from their to Pemmilton Castle. This not being considered safe, on account of the proximity of the Union army, they were removed to Belle Island . They were again removed for safety to Andersonville, and the nearness of Sherman ’s army caused them to be sent to Charleston, and thence to Florence, South Carolina . During fifteen months and twenty days, Mr. Anderson endured the miseries of the Southern prisons. He was discharged at Columbus, Ohio, May 23, 1865, at the end of two years and ten months of service. Samuel F. Anderson, a brother of James, was a member of the same company and regiment. He died of starvation in the prison at Andersonville . Mr. Anderson’s father-in-law was also a soldier. He died in a hospital during the war. James H. Anderson was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, January 16, 1837, a son of James and Mary (Hildebrand) Anderson. He married Eliza Jane Wickard, December 29, 1862, in Wood county, Ohio . Mrs. Anderson was born in Wood county, November 6, 1835, a daughter of Henry Wickard. Children by the first wife, born: James H., November 6, 1863, now lives at Seneca, Ohio; Philip M., October 3, 1866; Ulysses Grant, June 15, 1868; Henry, September 8, 1870, deceased; Arthur, April 7, 1873, resides in Michigan. There are no children by the second marriage. Mr. Anderson is a laborer and lives at Clyde, Ohio .

Amos Arbogast

Enlisted at Bellevue, Ohio, August 18, 1862, as a private in Company H, 107th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. His regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 2d division, 11th army corps. He entered with his regiment into the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, which were the most severe of their engagements, then Hagerstown, Morris Island, Johns Island, South Carolina. At this last engagement the Union army escaped just in time to avoid defeat, as the enemy were re-inforced the following day. After this Mr. Arbogast and his comrades were stationed in Florida, at Jacksonville, for nearly eleven months. He was detailed to the pioneer corps in South Carolina, under General Potter, and employed in throwing up breastworks. At the end of a service of three years he was discharged at Camp Cleveland, in August, 1865. John Arbogast, a brother of Amos, was a soldier in the war of the Rebellion. He now lives at Lewistown, Pennsylvania . Amos Arbogast was born in Union county, Pennsylvania, October 20, 1833, a son of Peter and Polly (Mineom) Arbogast. He married at Flat Rock, Ohio, Susan Harpster, born at Flat Rock, a daughter of Frederick and Sarah (Hollinshead) Harpster. Their four children were born: Mary Jane, November 9, 1870; Charles R., January 21, 1876; John Edward, December 11, 1879; and Ida Mabel, March 31, 1884. Mr. Arbogast is a carpenter and resides near Bellevue, Ohio .

Charles Barber

Entered the army May 3, 1861. He enrolled at Lafayette, Indiana, as a private in Company B, 20th Indiana Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 2d division, 3d army corps. Mr. Barber was promoted to the rank of sergeant September 10, 1862. He participated in the battles of Gettysburg, Shiloh, Picket Mills, Swift Run, Atlanta, Mile Creek, and many other battles and skirmishes of less note. Shortly before the battle of Shiloh, he was on the picket line and was in a pine tree. A rebel shot him and so stunned him that he fell to the ground. Thinking him dead the rebel began to rifle his pockets, when Mr. Barber held onto him and took him into camp a prisoner, he receiving the applause of the officers and his comrades. At the battle of Gettysburg, July 3, 1863, Mr. Barber received a gunshot wound in the left arm. He led the life of a soldier for three years, and was discharged at Newark, New Jersey, May 5, 1864. He was born at Rochester, New York, June 20, 1838. His father is Samuel Barger, and his mother’s maiden name was Etta L. Veider. At Cleveland, Ohio, November 7, 1867, he married Flora Jenkins. Mrs. Barber was born at Cleveland, June 2, 1841, the daughter of Charles and Flora (Maynard) Jenkins. Mr. Barber is employed by the railroad, and resides in Clyde, Ohio .

Charles A. Barber

Enlisted on the 21st day of October, 1861, at Bloomingville, Erie county, Ohio . He entered, as a private, Company A, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 1st division, 15th army corps. Mr. Barber re-enlisted at Colliersville, Mississippi, December 22, 1863, in the same company and regiment. For meritorious services on the field, at Nashville, Tennessee, he was promoted corporal, December 14, 1864. He engaged in the battles of Pittsburg Landing, Corinth, Holly Springs, Grand Gulf, two engagements at Jackson, Mississippi, Black River, Vicksburg, Champion Hills, Brandon, Guntown, Tupelo, and Spanish Fort, near Mobile, Alabama . The regiment marched twelve hundred miles, from Little Rock, Arkansas, following Price, and skirmishing nearly every day. At the close of an active service of three years and eleven months Mr. Barber was discharged at Vicksburg, Mississippi, September 11, 1865. He was born at Greenfield, Huron county, Ohio, June 16, 1845, a son of Nelson and Phoebe (House) Barber. In Sandusky City, Ohio, December 29, 1869, he married Martha A. Dalzell. Mrs. Barber was born in Bloomingville, Ohio, February 20, 1853, the daughter of Robert and Hester (Clark) Dalzell. They have two children, a daughter, Minnie M., born July 30, 1871, and a son, Charles, born February 13, 1874. Mr. Barber is now carrying on his farm, near Whitmore, Sandusky county, Ohio .

Henry C. Barnard

Entered Company G. 123d Ohio Volunteer Infantry, at Sandusky City, Ohio, August 12, 1862. His regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 2d division, 24th army corps. In June, 1864, Mr. Barnard was promoted to corporal. He engaged in the battles of Winchester, Strasburg, New Market, Piedmont and Opequon Creek, Virginia. At this latter engagement he was shot through the neck by a musket ball, and for a time his life was despaired of. He recovered, however, and was sent home. He was taken prisoner in the Milroy engagement, June 15, 1863, and confined in Libby prison one month, and then exchanged at City Point. At High Bridge he was captured a second time, held three days and recaptured at Lee’s surrender. Mr. Barnard was on several occasions assigned to special duty as guard, and received the highest commendation from his superior officers for his bravery and for his capabilities. He draws a pension of eight dollars a month. After a service of three years he was discharged at Camp Chase, Ohio, June 12, 1865. He is a member of C.B. Gambee Post, No. 33, G.A.R. Mr. Barnard was born at Bellevue, Ohio, November 19, 1841. His parents are Calvin and Mary (Nims) Barnard. At Ashtabula, Ohio, November 22, 1864, he was married to Sophia S. Carr. Mrs. Barnard was born at Sharon, Medina County, Ohio, December 1, 1843, the daughter of Samuel and Sophia (Foster) Carr. They have two children: Mary S., born January 8, 1870, and Jennie C. May 21, 1872. Mr. Barnard is engaged in the cultivation of his farm, near Bellevue.

Joseph Ridgeway Bartlett

Eldest child of Brice J. and Phebe (Ellis) Bartlett, was born in Seneca County, Ohio, on July 16, 1830. In the fall of 1833 his parents settled in Lower Sandusky, now Fremont. Having received a common school education he engaged in the study of the law under his father, a leading lawyer in that section of the State, and in May, 1853, was admitted to practice law, and associated himself in business with his father. He was married in June, 1853, at Fremont, to Rachel P. Mitchener, daughter of Ryner and Lydia (Pimm) Mitchener, by whom he had two children, neither of whom are now living. His father having died in March, 1859, he continued alone in the practice of the law until 1861. In that year he took an active part in raising troops for the three months service, and upon the call for three years troops he organized Company F, 49th Regiment Ohio Infantry Volunteers, then organizing at Camp Noble, Tiffin, and on the 26th day of August was elected captain of Company F, and commissioned as such by the governor of Ohio September 18, 1861. September 10, 1861, his company and regiment moved to Camp Dennison, and on September 21st left for Louisville, Kentucky, arriving there the next day, being the first organized regiment that entered the state. He continued in command of his company, participating in all the marches, campaigns, skirmishes and battles in which the 49th Regiment was engaged until November 1862. In November, 1862, Captain Bartlett was detached on staff duty, as Inspector of the 2d division of the Army of the Cumberland, General J. W. Sill commanding. In December following, General Sill was assigned to another command, and General R. W. Johnson was assigned to the command of the 2d division. Captain Bartlett was continued in the same position, and until after the battle of Liberty Gap, in addition to his duties as inspector, performed those of adjutant general of the division. In May, 1863, he was re-appointed inspector of the 2d division, 20th army corps, and continued as such until the reorganization of the army at Chattanooga, in November, 1863, when he was appointed inspector of the 3d division, 4th army corps, commanded by General T. J. Wood, and continued as such until December 17, 1864, being the second day of the battle of Nashville, when he took command of his regiment, having been on the 5th of that month promoted to major, and there being no field officer with his regiment, Major Strong having been wounded the day previous. He did not, however, receive any order relieving him from duty as division inspector until January 11, 1865. March 29, 1865, he was promoted and commissioned as lieutenant-colonel of the 49th, and June 26, 1865, he was promoted and commissioned as colonel of that regiment. Colonel Bartlett remained in command of his regiment, serving with it until it was mustered out of the service at Victoria, Texas, November 30, 1865, from which place the regiment was ordered to Camp Chase, near Columbus, Ohio, where it was paid off and finally discharged, December 30, 1865. Colonel Bartlett participated in the battles of his regiment, and, although exposed many times to great danger, was never wounded. He was captured on the second day of the battle of Chickamauga, in the rear of his division line of battle, by the rebel skirmishers, while seeking General Thomas to report to him information from General Johnson. After awhile he succeeded in making his escape, and met General Thomas, with several members of his staff, not to exceed one hundred yards distant from where he was captured, riding in a direction between the enemy’s line of battle and their skirmishers, of which fact he informed General Thomas, and thereby doubtless prevented his capture by the enemy. Colonel Bartlett has been repeatedly complimented for energy of character, soundness of judgment in military matters, and personal bravery and gallantry on the field of battle by several brigade, division, corps and department commanders. At the close of the war Colonel Bartlett resumed the practice of law at Fremont, Ohio, and at this writing is one of the most popular and successful lawyers of his county.

Andrew Barto

Enlisted April 15, 1861, at Toledo, Ohio, as a private in Company K, 14th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He re-enlisted on the 13th of October, 1861, at Fremont, Ohio, and entered Company F, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 1st division, 14th, 15th and 16th army corps. In January, 1864, he veteranized at Germantown, Tennessee, entering the same company. Mr. Barto was actively engaged in the battles of Philippi, West Virginia, Laurel Hill and Garretts Ford, West Virginia, Shiloh, Tennessee, siege of Corinth, three engagements at Jackson and the siege of Vicksburg, Mississippi. At the disastrous battle of Guntown, Mississippi, Mr. Barto, with fifty of his company, including his captain and first lieutenant, was taken prisoner. They were sent to Andersonville, Georgia, and endured the privations and hardships of the prison pen until the middle of September, 1864, and were then sent to Florence, South Carolina. Mr. Barto was reduced in weight to seventy-two pounds. Here they remained until February 10, 1865, when, for ten days, they were kept in the woods, without any shelter, and then sent to Wilmington, North Carolina, and paroled. From Annapolis, Maryland, Mr. Barto went home on a thirty days furlough, and afterwards reported at Camp Chase, Columbus, Ohio, and was discharged June 13, 1865. He had served his country long and well. With the exception of about a year which was spent in prison, he was actively engaged, with his regiment, during four years and two months.
He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post No. 32, G.A.R. John G. Barto, father of Andrew, was a soldier in the Mexican war. He served during the war and was honorably discharged. He died in 1873, and is buried at Dayton, Ohio. Andrew Barto was born in Riley township, Sandusky County, Ohio, November 30, 1839. His parents were John G. and Catherine (Shumaker) Barto. In his native township he was married, July 30, 1865, to Fietty Boyer, born in Crawford County, Ohio, August 2, 1845, the daughter of Gideon and Elizabeth (Cherry) Boyer. Their children were born: George F., May 16, 1866; Peter Daniel, April 16, 1868; Louvinyah, December, 1870; Charles Edward, in January, 1872; Julius, in January 1875, died at the age of three days; and William A., February, 1880; Andrew, October 9, 1884. Mr. Barto is a carpenter, and resides at Fremont, Ohio.

David Beamer

Left his home and family and enlisted at Republic, Ohio, May 2, 1864. He enrolled as a private in Company K, 164th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. His regiment was sent to Washington D.C. as guard to the city. Mr. Beamer shared in all the duties of his regiment, and contracted rheumatism during the severe exposure of his life in the army. He entered into no engagements, though he would have preferred to do so. He served his country four months, and was honorably discharged at Tiffin, Ohio, August 27, 1864. He was born in Adams County, Pennsylvania, June 19, 1826. His parents are Michael and Susan (Orner) Beamer. At Tiffin, Ohio, February 15, 1852, he married Elizabeth Orner, born in Pickaway County, Ohio, December 7, 1833, the daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Orner. They have three children: George, born March, 1853, now lives in Ottawa County, Ohio; Mary Ann, residing at Toledo, Ohio, and Joseph, born October 17, 1859. Mr. Beamer is engaged in business as carpenter, and resides at Clyde, Ohio.

Pierre Beaugrand, M.D.

Entered the army at Cleveland, Ohio, as a surgeon of the 169th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was discharged at Cleveland at the end of a service of one hundred days. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. Pierre Beaugrand was born at Detroit, Michigan, August 26, 1814, a son of John B. and Marguerite (Chabert) Beaugrand. His father removed from Detroit, in the winter of 1823, and came to Lower Sandusky, now Fremont, on the ice, there being no roads at that time. In March 1833, Dr. Beaugrand began the study of medicine with Drs. B. & La. Q. Rawson, of Findlay, Ohio. Attended a session, in the winter of 1835-6 at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, in New York, and graduated at the Ohio Medical College, Cincinnati, in the spring of 1845. He is the oldest physician and surgeon in Sandusky County, where he has been practicing for fifty years. He resides in Fremont.

Christian Beck

Enlisted at Fremont, Ohio, March 14, 1863. He enrolled as a private in Company F, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and his regiment was then in service in the 15th army corps. Mr. Beck’s first encounter with the enemy was in the unfortunate engagement at Guntown, Mississippi, June 10, 1864. Here, on the 12th, with more than three thousand brave men, he was taken prisoner. They were held in a farm house about one week and were then sent to Guntown, thence to Andersonville . At the end of three months they were removed to Florence, South Carolina, and remained three months longer. Mr. Beck was then paroled and sent home. The privations he endured during his prison life unfitted him for duty, and he was under the care of a doctor for six months before he could return to his regiment and receive his discharge. Two years and four months he was a soldier, and his experiences were more severe than if he had spent that time in the line of battle. He was discharged at Camp Chase, near Columbus, Ohio, July 20, 1865. October 29, 1844, he was born, in Bedford County, Pennsylvania, a son of George W. and Sarah (Ripley) Beck. He married, at Fremont, Ohio, January 11, 1867, Susan E. Newsbaum. Mrs. Beck was born in Seneca County, Ohio, April 21, 1843, the daughter of Edward and Margaret (Shull) Newsbaum, and died August 30, 1880. The children of Mr. Beck were born: Cora Bell, November 24, 1868, now living in Henry County, Ohio; Margaret Ellen, March 3, 1870, lives at Fremont; Sarah C., July 28, 1871, lives in Sandusky County; William S., October 20, 1872, also lives in Sandusky County; Edward E., July 30, 1874, living in Indiana; Almeda, April 24, 1876, lives in Sandusky County; Lewis L., December 15, 1877, and Franklin, February 11, 1879, reside in Henry County. Mr. Beck is a farmer and resides near Green Springs, Seneca County, Ohio.

Philip Beckley

Was a member of the 55th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He enlisted as a private September 24, 1861, at Bellevue, Ohio, entering Company A. December 25, 1863, he re-enlisted at Chattanooga, Tennessee, and was assigned to the regimental band, which was famous even among the rebels for its fine music. He participated with his comrades in the battles of Bull Run, Sulphur Spring, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Lookout Mountain; Raccoon Mountain, which was an encounter in the night, the 33d lost eighty men; Missionary Ridge, which was a severe encounter, and they followed the enemy for quite a distance. After the battle of Knoxville, Tennessee, November 17, 1863, Mr. Beckley was in a succession of skirmishes and engagements, incident to the siege of Atlanta, Georgia, until the fall of that place, July 28, 1864. At the battle of Resaca, the colonel of the regiment, C. B. Gambee, was killed. He served his country long and well. He was discharged at the end of nearly four years of active service at Cleveland. In C. B. Gambee Post, No. 33, G.A.R., he holds the position of officer of the guard. Mr. Beckley was born in Wooster, Wayne County, Ohio, August 11, 1843, the son of Conrad and Susan (Smith) Beckley. He married at Bellevue, Ohio, September 30, 1873, Clara Selley, who was born at Bellevue, December 20, 1855, a daughter of Henry and Elizabeth (Dora) Selley. They have a family consisting of two sons and two daughter, who were born: Minnie Maude, October 6, 1875; Thomas Vernon, August 20, 1877; Carrie Bell, April 23, 1880; Ralph Stephen, April 20, 1883. Mr. Beckley is a machinist and resides at Bellevue, Ohio.

James Bennett

A few months after the outbreak of the war of the Rebellion, enlisted at Rochester, Indiana. He entered Company A, 26th Indiana Volunteer infantry, as a private, July 2, 1861. The regiment was assigned to the army of the frontier. Mr. Bennett re-enlisted January 31, 1864, at Brownsville, Texas, entering the same company. He took part in the siege of Vicksburg, Mississippi, and entered the city with the victorious soldiers, July 4, 1864. At Prairie Grove they had a severe encounter with the enemy, and the regiment lost half of its men in thirty minutes. Mr. Bennett escaped with a bullet hole in his pantaloons leg. He serve his country during four years, seven months and eleven days, and was honorably discharged at Vicksburg, January 8, 1866. He was born in Barbour County, West Virginia, May 9, 1842. His parents are Henry and Phoebe (Hudkins) Bennett. April 21, 1866, he married at Kewanna, Indiana, Anna Arnold, who was born in Clearfield County, Pennsylvania, the daughter of David S. and Mary (Leiter) Arnold. Their children were born: Mary Lizzie, June 22, 1870; David Henry, October 27, 1874; Warner, August 3, 1876; and Walter, October 15, 1878, died November 28, 1879. Mr. Bennett now enjoys the peace which his efforts have aided in bringing to his country, on his farm near Bellevue, Sandusky County, Ohio.

Philip Bingel

Enlisted at Bellevue, Ohio, February 10, 1865, as a private in Company G, 188th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. At Nashville, Tennessee, he was engaged in the performance of post duty most of the time, and often was obliged to lie in the water. He here contracted rheumatism and was rendered unfit for manual labor for life. On several different occasions he was assigned to special and very dangerous guard duty, which he performed in such a manner as to win the praise of his superior officers. He served during eight months, and was discharged at Camp Chase. He is a member of C.B. Gambee Post, No. 33 G.A.R. In Germany, August 2, 1827, he was born, a son of Antoine and Elizabeth (Gadwinkel) Bingel. He married in Thompson, Sandusky County, Ohio, December 25, 1856, Catherine Jacobs, born at Niederradern, France, October 17, 1833, the daughter of Valentine and Margaret (Pridenstine) Jacobs. Their children were born: Elizabeth M., October 25, 1857; Magdalena, May 27, 1860, died March 15, 1861; Jacob Valentine, September 8, 1862; Philip Antoine, January 22, 1864, died December 31, 1864; Catherine, October 31, 1866; John, April 3, 1868. Mr. Bingel is a cooper and resides at Bellevue, Ohio.

Melancthon Binkley

Entered the army as a private in Company K, 57th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He enlisted at Fremont, Ohio, October 23, 1861. The regiment was assigned to Hildebrand’s brigade, Sherman’s division. The first engagement into which Mr. Binkley entered with his regiment was at Shiloh, Tennessee. In this battle, April 6, 1862, he was wounded by a musket ball, which shattered the ankle bone of his left foot, being the first man wounded in his regiment. He was placed upon a horse and taken from the battlefield to a point near Pittsburg Landing, and in the morning was removed to Crumps Landing, and after two weeks taken to Paducah, Kentucky. In a few days he was sent to Keokuk, Iowa, where he remained until September 20, 1862, although on the 26th day of August he had been discharged on surgeon’s certificate of disability. He re-enlisted September 15, 1864, at Warren, Ohio, as a private in Company I, 177th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 2d brigade, 2d division, 23d army corps. With this regiment Mr. Binkley took an active part in the battles of Stone River, Tennessee, Fort Anderson, Town Creek, Wilmington and Kinston, North Carolina. He was on detached duty for two months at Raleigh, North Carolina. A lieutenant and forty men, he among the number, constituted an ordnance guard. They had their headquarters near the capitol building. He was discharged with his regiment in Greensboro, North Carolina, June 24, 1865, having served one year and eight months. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. Ira Crane, cousin of Mr. Binkley’s wife, was a member of the 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was a prisoner of war for several months and was killed on the ill-fated steamer Sultana when she was blown up on the Mississippi river, April 26, 1865. Amos Crane was also a member of the 72d regiment. He died near Sand Ridge, Alabama, of disease contracted in the army. The two brothers died within a week of one another. Mr. Binkley was born in Sandusky County, Ohio, September 15, 1844, a son of Michael and Ann (Albert) Binkley. He married at Fremont, October 23, 1865, Eliza Campbell, born in Sandusky County, January 4, 1845, the daughter of William and Catherine (Glick) Campbell. Their daughter, Florence Gertrude, was born July 8, 1866, and was separated from them by death November 4, 1867. Mr. Binkley is a carpenter and resides at Fremont, Ohio.


Martin Bollear

A native of Switzerland, enrolled his name among the defenders of his adopted country in 1865. He enlisted as a private in Company F, 184th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the Army of the Cumberland. Mr. Bollear participated in the battle of Franklin during two days. The exposure of his service in the army brought on rheumatism, from which he has suffered ever since. He was a soldier during seven months, and was discharged at Nashville, Tennessee. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. Mr. Bollear was born in Switzerland, October 11, 1832. His parents are Henry and Elizabeth (Creter) Bollear. At Fremont, Ohio, in July, 1874, he married Julia Wiger. Mrs. Bollear was born in Sandusky County, Ohio, February 28, 1852, the daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth (Smith) Wiger. They have two daughters, Elizabeth, who was born March 14, 1875, and Emma, whose birthday occurs November 18; she was born in 1878. Mr. Bollear owns a farm near Riley Center, with post office address at Fremont, O. He is at present engaged in cultivating his farm.

Austin O. Bolton

Served in the Union army long and faithfully. He enlisted at Fremont, Ohio, August 2, 1861, entering Company F, 49th Ohio Volunteer Infantry as a private. His regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade 3d, 4th army corps. At Chattanooga, Tennessee, January 1, 1864, he veteranized as hospital steward. Mr. Bolton was actively engaged in the battles of Shiloh and Stone River, Tennessee, Missionary Ridge and Buzzards Roost. He was detailed on special service at the division hospital at Dalton, Georgia, where his duties consisted in compounding prescriptions for sick and disabled soldiers. At the battle of Murfreesboro, Tennessee, he was wounded. For four years and four months he was a soldier, and was discharged November 30, 1865. At the battle of Stone River he was twice captured, and escaped both times. Mr. Bolton was born in Genesee County, Michigan, August 14, 1841, a son of E.A. and Mary A. (Downer) Bolton. He married at Kansas, Ohio, February 25, 1864, Susan Freese. Mrs. Bolton was born in Wyandotte County, Ohio, September 16, 1840, the daughter of John and Mary A. (Richardson) Freese. Their children were born: William H., January 19, 1867; Mary E., March 23, 1869; Emma, August 25, 1872, died November 2, 1878; Wintield, February 20, 1876. William H. died October 7, 1882. Mr. Bolton is an engineer and resides at Lindsey, Ohio.


George E. Boop

Enlisted at Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, August 22, 1862. He entered Company E, 142d Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, as a private. The regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 2d division, 9th army corps. Mr. Boop participated in the battle of Fredericksburg, Virginia, in which the loss by killed and wounded in Company E was very great. The company were assigned to fatigue duty at Fort Massachusetts, near Washington, District of Columbia . And while Mr. Boop was assisting in handling heavy timbers he received an injury to his spine from which he has never entirely recovered. He entered the hospital at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Here he was assigned to duty in the mess-room for some time. On recovering sufficiently he was assigned to the 51st Company, 2d Battalion, Reserve Corps. The 2d battalion performed guard duty at the hospital, in the city and over prisoners as they were taken to points in the north. Mr. Boop was promoted to corporal in the reserve corps. He serve about three years, and was discharged at Philadelphia, August 28, 1865. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. At New Berlin, Union County, Pennsylvania, he was born August 8, 1833, a son of Samuel and Hannah (Spitler) Boop. He married in his native town, February 1, 1857, Fiena Stealy, born in Berks County, Pennsylvania, the daughter of John and Catherine (Reaber) Stealy. Their children were born: Samuel F., November 18, 1857, died December 26, 1857; Mary C., February 29, 1860; Alice E., May 7, 1862; Hanna Stella May, March 5, 1878. Mr. Boop is engaged in business as a shoemaker and painter and resides in Fremont, Ohio.

John H. Boop

Was a soldier in the regular army. He enlisted at Toledo, Ohio, September 30, 1876, entering Company M, 3d United States Cavalry, as a private. Colonel Brackett commanded the regiment, and they were assigned to the department of Platt. Mr. Boop was detailed as trumpeter for some time. He was promoted to first corporal May 1, 1880, for meritorious conduct in the field, and returned to his company. He participated in the battles of Otter Creek, Powder River, Wind River, Wounded Knee, and the second battle of Rosebud. Here the army captured about fifteen hundred Indians, principally Sioux and Cheyennes. The loss to the United States troops was eighteen killed and about forty wounded. The battle opened by an assault of the 3d and 5th United States Cavalry, and the 7th United States Infantry, at three o’clock in the morning. At four o’clock in the afternoon the entire force under Sitting Bull surrendered and were taken to Fort Robinson, Nebraska, thence to Fort Sidney, in the same State, and were turned over to the Indian department. Mr. Boop was in the service during five years and was discharged at Fort McKinney, Wyoming Territory, September 29, 1881. He was born in Union County, Pennsylvania, September 13, 1857, a son of Charles H. and Elizabeth (Yeagar) Boop. He resides at present in Fremont, Ohio, and is occupied as a laborer.

James H. Boor

Abandoning his studies and teaching, gave up his bright prospects and entered the service of his country. He enlisted in Jackson Township, Sandusky County, Ohio, August 19, 1862, as a private in the 11th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Soon after his entrance into the army Mr. Boor was taken sick and would have been discharged, but he begged to remain and do some duty in the camp or hospital. He was detailed to special service as steward on the hospital boat, and performed his duty here with courage and patience until July 6, 1863 when he died. He was in the army eleven months. His brother heard, during the battle of Atlanta, Georgia, that he was dead, and went to find him, but he lay among the unknown soldiers, and his grave could not be found. His memory is still cherished by all who knew him. James H. Boor was born in Jackson Township, Ohio, April 15, 1840, a son of William and Sarah (Caesna) Boor. He was the principal dependence of his mother, who, though deserving a pension, has never applied for one. His brothers and sisters were born: Josiah, December 15, 1824, now resides in Nebraska; Mary A., April 27, 1826, residing in Dakota; Margarett E. January 3, 1828; Martha, November 14, 1829, died in March, 1830; Eliza J., March 21, 1831; William C. August 25, 1833; Samuel, August 30, 1835; Elizabeth A., March 13, 1838; Silas C., July 17, 1842; and Frances M., May 4, 1845. Mr. Boor was a student and teacher at Helena, Ohio.

James Walice Boose

Leaving his home and family, enlisted in Woodville Township, Sandusky County, Ohio, August 9, 1862. He enrolled as a private in Company G, 111th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 2d division, 23d army corps. Mr. Boose encountered the enemy at Mill Springs, Kentucky; Burlington and Owensboro, Kentucky. At the latter place they surprised Morgan’s men at breakfast, and captured thirty-two of them. The rest made their escape, leaving their kettles, dishes and rations. Mr. Boose was taken sick at Bowling Green, Kentucky, with diphtheria, dropsy and erysipelas, which obliged him to remain in the hospital about six months. A part of this time he was not expected to live, and still suffers in many ways from his long illness. He has applied for a pension, but, although deserving, has not yet received one. During eighteen months he served his country as a brave and faithful soldier. He was discharged at Bowling Green, January 18, 1864. He is a member of Canfield Post, No. 124, G.A.R. September 10, 1827, he was born in Perry County, Ohio, a son of Henry and Elizabeth (Plummer) Boose, both now deceased. He married in Sandusky County, Ohio, March 30, 1851, Susana Steinaman. Mrs. Boose was born in New York State, Erie County, January 8, 1827, the daughter of Jacob and Catharine (Sleabaugh) Steinaman. Two children have been born to them, a son, Leonard H., on January 14, 1852, and a daughter, Elsie A., December 30, 1854, now residing in Otttawa County, Ohio. Mr. Boose is a farmer, and resides near Gibsonburg, Ohio .

Hiram K. Brooks

Was among the first to answer his country’s call for soldiers. He enlisted at Martins Ferry, Belmont County, Ohio, April 16, 1861, as a private in Company B, 15th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. At the end of his three months enlistment he was discharged and re-enlisted at Martins Ferry, September 8, 1861, as a private in Company G., 15th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He veteranized at Strawberry Plains, January 1, 1864. He shared with his regiment the dangers of battles of Shiloh, Stone River, Perryville, Chickamauga, Franklin, Nashville, Missionary Ridge, Resaca, New Hope Church, Peachtree Creek, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Philippi, Carricks Ford, and many other engagements of less note. December 31, 1862, he was taken prisoner at Stone River, Tennessee, and held six months at Libby and Castle Thunder. Here he experienced the privations of these famous prisons, and saw men, for slight offenses, and when weak from hunger, made to stand on a barrel and mark time by the hour. When paroled he was detailed to provost guard duty at Columbus, Ohio. He was discharged at San Antonio, Texas, November 21, 1865, at the end of a service of four years, seven months and thirteen days. He has made no application for a pension and he never received his commutation money for being in prison. At Martins Ferry, Ohio, he was born January 17, 1843, a son of Benjamin and Martha (Taylor) Brooks. He married, at Helena, Ohio, December 11, 1873, Leah J. Croyle, born in Bedford County, Pennsylvania, February 5, 1855, a daughter of Abraham and Barbara (Burket) Croyle. Their children were born: Martha, May 30, 1875; George W., July 4, 1877; Eldora, July 4, 1879; Alice, July 11, 1881. Mr. Brooks is a laborer, and lives at Gibsonburg, Ohio.

John W. Brown

Entered the Union army at Cumberland, Maryland, July 10, 1861, as a private in Company H, 2d Potomac Home Brigade. He re-enlisted January 31, 1862, at Rainsburg, Pennsylvania, entering Company D, 101st Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. He engaged in the siege of Yorktown, lasting from April 17, 1862, until May 4, and took an active part in the battles of Williamsburg, New Kent Court House, Fair Oaks, Malvern Hill, Kinston, North Carolina; Whitehall, North Carolina; Goldsboro, North Carolina, and many other encounters with the enemy of more or less importance. He was assigned to special duty as provost guard, and volunteered to go with the 71st Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry to assist in destroying the railroad at Goldsboro. While there three men left the rebel lines and ran within the Union lines. They were drafted men and deserted. April 20, 1864, at Plymouth, North Carolina, Mr. Brown was taken prisoner and sent to Andersonville for five months, and then he was taken to Savannah, Georgia, and sent thence to Charleston, thence to Florence, to Wilmington, to Goldsboro, and then brought back to Wilmington and paroled. While at Andersonville he suffered greatly from hunger and exposure. His only cooking utensil was a small tin pail, for which he and several comrades paid eight dollars. He witnessed the hanging of the six raiders for robbery and murder. One day during a severe storm a large tree in the prison yard was struck by lightning, and the same day a spring burst through the ground, much to the comfort of the prisoners. During three years and five months Mr. Brown was a brave soldier, always ready for duty and courageous in the hour of danger. He is a member of Canfield Post, No. 124, G.A.R. Two brothers of the subject of our sketch were in the army. They were taken prisoners at the same time, and went through the same prisons as John W. Mr. Brown was born in Bedford County, Pennsylvania, November 2, 1836, a son of George F. and Elizabeth (Detwiler) Brown. He married at Plymouth, North Carolina, April 12, 1864, Emily A. Atkins, Born in Tyrrell County, North Carolina, the daughter of James and Maria (Merritt) Atkins. Mr. Brown is engaged in business as a shoemaker, and resides at Gibsonburg, Ohio.


John G. Brugger

Entered the signal corps of the United States Army (Cavalry), as a private. He enlisted February 18, 1864, and the corps was assigned to the army of the Tennessee. Mr. Brugger was in the Atlanta campaign at Kenesaw Mountain, and in front of Atlanta. His corps held the signal stations. They were once cut off from the main force by Hood and were in great danger but were reinforced by General Sherman after some time and the rebels were forced to retreat. Mr. Brugger marched with Sherman to the sea. They had the signal station on a rice mill near Fort McAllister to communicate with the fleet. When the fort was taken by General Hazen the signal corps marched through North and South Carolina, and were present at the surrender of Columbia and Raleigh. Mr. Brugger was in the service eighteen months and was discharged at Louisville, Kentucky, August 20, 1865. He was born in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, October 30, 1831, a son of John G. and Catharine (Arnold) Brugger. He now follws the peaceful occupation of farming near Clyde, Sandusky County, Ohio .

Ralph Pomeroy Buckland

Was born in Leyden, Massachusetts, January 20, 1812. His grandfather, Stephen Buckland, and his father, Ralph Buckland, died from the immediate effects of military service rendered our country, the former dying in the Jersey prison ship, near New York, and the latter from disease contracted while a prisoner of war in 1812. October 2, 1861, Ralph P. Buckland was appointed by Governor Dennison lieutenant colonel, with authority to raise the 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He recruited the regiment, was promoted to colonel, and was mustered into service January 10, 1862. Fourteen days later he was ordered with his regiment to Camp Chase. There he commanded the camp until ordered to Paducah, Kentucky, February 19th. At Paducah his regiment was assigned to the 4th brigade, Sherman’s division, Army of the Tennessee, and he was placed in command of the brigade. March 7th he embarked with his brigade on steamer, and proceeded up the Tennessee river, disembarking at Pittsburg Landing March 18th. Two days later he camped near Shiloh church. April 3d, while reconnoitering with his regiment four miles to the front, he had a skirmish with the enemy, and the next day, placing himself at the head of three companies of the 72d, he rescued Company B of the regiment, which had been sent out as scouts and was surrounded by rebel cavalry. A number of the enemy were killed and some captured. April 6th General Buckland had his brigade in line of battle full an hour before the hard fighting began. Then advancing his lines he met the enemy, and for two hours the battle raged desperately between them, and the rebels were repeatedly driven back. The character of the fighting is shown in the following extract from a letter of the Confederate general, Basil W. Duke, published in the Cincinnati Gazette, May 28, 1881: “Every demonstration against it (Buckland’s brigade) was repulsed. Artillery was used in vain against it. Some of the best brigades in the army moved on it, only to be hurled back and strew the morass in its front with their dead. The Confederate loss at this point was frightful. At last, after having held this position from seven or half-past seven A.M. until after ten A.M., everything upon its right (left) having been driven back, and the Confederate artillery having reached a point where the guns could play upon its rear, it was abandoned as no longer tenable. The tenacious defense of this position, and the fact that by massing on his right General Johnston turned it, when it proved impregnable to direct assault, ought to be of itself a sufficient explanation of the correctness of his plan of battle.” General Buckland’s brigade maintained its position until ordered back by General Sherman. Monday morning it was the only organized brigade of the division to go into the fight. During the day General Buckland was ordered to advance his brigade under a heavy fire from the enemy’s musketry and artillery, and there seemed to be some hesitation for a moment in the lines. He immediately rode up to a color bearer, laid hold of the staff, and conducted bearer and colors to the front, followed by the cheers of the men as they swept forward. General Sherman gave General Buckland high praise for his courage and generalship in this battle. General Lew. Wallace, riding Tuesday morning over the ground occupied by the enemy in front of Buckland’s brigade on Sunday morning, said: “Judging from the dead bodies, here seems to have been the best and hardest fighting.” In the advance on Corinth, sickness, homesickness and hard service began to demoralized some of the regiments. General Buckland, with the assistance of his surgeon, Dr. J. B. Rice, maintained discipline at the temporary cost of popularity, but to the great benefit of his men, as they fully acknowledge when more familiar with war’s necessities. Before Shiloh it had been asserted that General Buckland was a man of no courage; after that battle his soldierly qualities were never disputed. After the march to Corinth he became universally beloved by his soldiers, and implicitly trusted, a trust he never ceased to merit and receive. At Camp No. 6 he was assigned to the 3d brigade and afterward returned to his regiment. In the fight before Corinth the 72d was constantly under fire, and he entered that city at its head on the 30th of May. November 12, 1862, he took command of the 5th brigade, Lauman’s division, and the brigade formed part of the Tallehatchee expedition. He recaptured Holly Springs from Van Dorn, then took command of Ross’ division, marched to Davis Mill, thence with several regiments pursued Forrest, passing through Dresden, Paris and Huntington, Tennessee, subsisting entirely on the country, and reaching Jackson, Tennessee, January 8, 1863. March 20th he joined General Sherman before Vicksburg, and in that memorable siege he was in constant service, often in positions of great danger and his gallant bearing attracted special attention. May 19th, on foot, at the head of his brigade, he marched down the graveyard road and took position under a terrific fire to support an assault, a position maintained until after the assault of the 22d. September 24th his right wrist was broken, and he was placed in command of the district of Memphis, where his administrative abilities were exemplified and his integrity of character made manifest. The following incident illustrates his courage, decision and promptness of action: Forrest, eluding his pursuers in Mississippi, reached Memphis by a forced march, surprised the guard, entered the city, and nearly captured the department commander, General Washburne. General Buckland, at the head of a few soldiers he could rally in the emergency, and in numbers greatly inferior to the enemy, attacked Forrest with a force and energy that in less than an hour drove every rebel from the city. A battle ensued on the outskirts and Forrest was defeated. General Buckland remained in command of Memphis until December 22, 1864, resigned January 6, 1865, and was duly mustered out, with brevet rank of major-general, for meritorious service, the commission dating March 13, 1865. In 1848, he was a delegate to the Whig convention at Philadelphia, which nominated General Taylor for the presidency; in the fall of 1855 he was elected to the state senate in Ohio, one of the first representatives there of the Republican party, and re-elected in 1857. During his service in the senate he was the author of the law for the adoption of children. In the thirty-ninth and fortieth congresses he represented the Ninth Ohio district. He was a delegate to the Cincinnati convention which nominated General Hayes for the presidency, and his labors and influence contributed largely to that result. In 1870- he was elected president of the Ohio Soldiers and Sailors Orphan Home, located at Xenia, the duties of which office he ably discharged for four years. In 1884 he was elected one of the Blaine electors, and at their meeting was elected president of the Ohio electoral college.

William A. Burr

Left home and wife and enlisted in the army as a defender of his country’s rights, December 4, 1861. He entered Company B, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry, from Sandusky County, Ohio, as a private. The regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 1st division, 15th army corps. During a march of the regiment, while on double quick, Mr. Burr fell on the ice and was crippled in the hip. He was in the service nearly one year and was discharged at Columbus, Ohio, November 21, 1862, on a surgeon’s certificate of disability. In Crawford County, Ohio, he was born, September 28, 1837. His father is Samuel Burr. His mother, Mary Elizabeth (Scott) Burr, was born in February, 1820. On January 29, 1860, at Castalia, Erie County, Ohio, Mr. Burr married Alzina Reed, born in Seneca County, Ohio, February 5, 1841. The parents of Mrs. Burr are Jonathan R. Reed, born January 11, 1818, and Jane (Offen) Reed, born March 4, 1822. Mr. Burr’s children were born: Jonathan Wesley, April 3, 1861; Samuel B, October 11, 1863; Mary Jane, September 3, 1865; William Sherman, May 18, 1868, died June 30, 1868; Albert Taylor, May 30, 1869; Lydia Ann, September 2, 1872; Marcia Alvina, May 1, 1876; and Sylvanus T., October 13, 1878. Mr. Burr is a farmer. His post office address is Clyde, Sandusy County, Ohio.

John Carbaugh

Gave three years of faithful service and his life to his country in her need. He enlisted at Fostoria, Ohio, August 22, 1861. The regiment was assigned to Buckland’s brigade. Mr. Carbaugh was appointed corporal, January 28,1962, and 4th sergeant July 1, of the same year. He was promoted to the rank of 2d lieutenant January 1,1864m for meritorious services in the field. At this date he veteranized and went home on a veteran furlough. Mr. Carbaugh took part in the battles of Shiloh, Tennessee, Macon, Georgia, Corinth, Mississippi, siege of Vicksburg, Jackson, Vrandonand in all of the engagements in which the regiment took part except when he was sick and during the nine months he was in prison. He was assigned to special duty in the pioneer corps at brigade and division headquarters, and performed his duties in such a manner as to win the commendation of his superior officers. April 7, 1862, he was wounded by a minie-ball through the right leg, at the battle of Shiloh. At the battle of Guntown, Mississippi, June 11,1864, he was taken prisoner and sent to Andersonville, from Richmond, Virginia. He was afterward transferred to Florence, Georgia. Here he died March 14, 1865 of disease contracted during the privations and hardships of his prison life. He had been a soldier for three years and seven months. William Hartly, brother of Mrs. Greenbrier, was a member of the Company H, 49th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He served about htree months and contracted camp fever from which he died November 22, 1861, at Camp Nevin, Kentucky. Mr. Carbaugh was born in Pennsylvania in 1826, a son of Martin and Catherine(Clemens) Carbaugh. He married at Fostoria, Ohio, February 22, 1855, Rebecca Hartly. Mrs. Carbaugh was born in Seneca county, Ohio, October 12, 1838, the daughter of Benjamin and Elza (Fox) Hartly. Four children were born to them: William Oscar, December 26, 1856; Mary Helen, January 24, 1858; Martha C., December 2, 1859; and Emma A., October 24, 1861. In 1870 Mrs. Carbaugh was married to J.D. Greenbrier and although six children were born to them, but one is now living. The deceased ones are Minnie; Metta and Myrta twins; Nettie and Frank Howard. Harry W., the second born is living with his mother. They reside at Fremont, Ohio. Mr. Carbaugh was a blacksmith and resided at Fostoria, Ohio.

Peter Franklin Cavalier

Enlisted at Sandusky City, Ohio, September 23, 1864. He entered Company E, 64th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as a private. The regiment belonged to the 3d brigade, 2d division, 4th army corps. Mr. Cavalier joined his regiment at Chattanooga, Tennessee, about the15th of October, 1864. They went to Stevenson Station, and then marched for four days, encamped for a short time and then marched to Franklin, Tennessee, where they took part in the battle at that place. Their next engagement was at Spring Hill, and they then participated in a series of skirmishes at Nashville, Tennessee. Mr. Cavalier was here when Hood made his attack on Nashville. He, with four others, was detailed as guard over the baggage of the regiment, and remained one week when they rejoined the regiment at Decatur, Alabama. Mr. Cavalier was taken sick with the mumps and sent to the hospital at Chattanooga, for six weeks. He rejoined his regiment at Athens, Alabama. He shared in all of their marches in Alabama and Tennessee, until they reached Nashville, the latter part of April, 1865. Here he remained until he was discharged, June 16, 1865, after a service of nine months. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. Joseph, a brother of Peter F., was a member of company G, 191st Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He died at Wheeling, Virginia, June 10, 1865, of measles and was buried at Wheeling. Peter F. Cavalier was born in Ottawa County, Ohio, February 6, 1841, a son of Albert and Mary (Monomy) Cavalier. He married in Seneca county, Ohio, June 8, 1866, Kittie Clark. Mrs. Cavalier was born in Seneca county, February 8, 1843, the daughter of Henry and Polly (Jones) Clark. Their children were born: Jennie Amelia, March 16, 1867; infant, November 26, 1879, died the same day; Minnie Bell, November 17, 1862; Clark Russell, May 11, 1879. Mr. Cavalier is a teamster and lives in Fremont, Ohio.

Richard Clark

During the first month of the war, April, 1861, entered Company G, 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as a private, re-enlisted and veteraned in same regiment. He enlisted at Fremont, Ohio and his regiment was assigned to the 2d brigade, 3d division, 15th army corps. Mr. Clark and his comrades numbered seven hundred men. They went to Grafton, West Virginia, and drove fifteen hundred rebels about fourteen miles. They then spent the night in an old grist mill. After a week or two in this section of the country they went to New Creek. Here they remained about a week and then made two raids on Romney, and were defeated both times. They fell back to New creek and in a third attack a few days after were successful. The next engagement of the regiment was at Winchester, Virginia. This was a heavy battle and resulted in a loss on both sides of about one hundred men. The battle of Gettysburg Mr. Clark and four others made a trip to the dismounted camp at Alexandria, Virginia, to obtain horses. On their return they were taken prisoners at Fairfax C. H. Virginia, and held about nine days. During two days they were kept in the woods and then taken to White Plains. At the end of seven days they were recaptured by the Union Army. Four years and two months he was in the army and was then discharged at Clouds Mils, near Alexandria, Virginia, June 17, 1865. Mr. Clark was born in Seneca county, New York, August 17, 1839. His father is Henry Clark and his mother’s maiden name was Polly Jones. He married at Tiffin, Ohio, September 15, 1865, Ellen Yarman, born in Hancock county, Ohio, August 4, 1847, the daughter of Joseph and Margaret (Caskey) Yarman. Their only son, William Henry, was born August 16, 1966. Mr. Clark is engaged in the cultivation of a farm near Clyde, Ohio.

Nathan Cochran

Was seventeen years of age when he enlisted in the Union army. He enrolled at Fremont, Ohio, October 16, 1861, as a private in Company B, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 1st division, 16th army corps. Mr. Cochran was actively engaged with his regiment in the battles of Shiloh, Corinth, Jackson (two engagements), Tupelo, and the disastrous and disgraceful encounter with the enemy at Guntown, Mississippi, where so many brave boys were captured and afterward spent weary months in prison. He was also in the battles at Vicksburg, Tallahatchee, Oldtown Creek, Nashville and Black River. Mr. Cochran was detailed as orderly for Colonel McMillan at Memphis, Tennesseee. His duty was to carry messages and act as guide. Just before the capture of Vicksburg he carried a message from the rear of that city to Black River, a distance of fourteen miles through country where the two armies had been fighting all day. The risks were such that much depended on the speed of his horse, in which, however, he had great confidence. The animal had been captured from a guerrilla, that part of the country being infested with bushwhackers who made prisoners of some of the orderlies. On one occasion Mr. Cochran was chosen to guide a lieutenant and his escort carrying messages from Tallahatchee river to Cox cross roads. He started in the evening and arrived at his destination at daybreak. The lieutenant had promised to see to him and send him back, but paid no attention to him. He went to General Grierson and explained the case, when he receiveed something to eat and was assigned a place with the orderlies as they were soon to march in the direction of his camp. Mr. Cochran was in the service three years, two months and fifteen days. He was discharged at Louisville, Kentucky, December 24, 1864. He is a member of the Eugene Rawson Post No. 32, G.A.R. At Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, November 9, 1844, he was born, a son of David S. and Elizabeth (Mays) Cochran. He married at Adrian, Michigan, April 5, 1869, Maggie Obermeyer, born in Washington township, Sandusky county, Ohio, January 16, 1852, the daughter of William and Abbie (Waggoner) Overmeyer. Their children were born: Marshall L., April 22, 1871; Emma, October 26, 1873; Irving, August 25, 1876, died March 8, 1877; Frank F., March 15, 1881, and Grace, January 15, 1884. Mr. Cochran is an engineer and resides in Lindsey, Ohio.

Parker D. Colman

On the 17th of September, 1861, enlisted at Springfield, New York, as veterinary surgeon of the 2d New York Calvary. Mr. Colman’s duty was to attend to the regimental horses. He had some very severe experiences and hard times during the two years and three months of his service, but he found many enjoyments in a soldier’s life. He was honorably discharged at Camp Palmer, December 19, 1863. He was born in Springfield, New York, a son of Nelson and Emeline (Hall) Colman. In York township, Sandusky county, Ohio, he married Ann Diamond. Mrs. Colman was born in England, a daughter of William and Elizabeth (Greenslae) Diamond. They have had two children, a son, William, and a daughter, Lillian, who died in 1876. Mr. Colman resides in Clyde, Ohio, where he is a veterinary surgeon.

Seth Hall Cook

Entered the army as a recruit August 22, 1862. He enlisted at Flat Rock, Seneca county, Ohio, and became a member of Company d, 44th Independent Zouaves. Mr. Cook joined his regiment at Point Pleasant, Virginia. During one year they were mounted zouaves and belonged to the cavalry brigade; they were then transferred to eh 34th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. In the latter part of 1863 Mr. Cook was promoted bugler, at Charleston, West Virginia. He took part in the battles of Winchester, Lynchburg, Charleston, Viriginia, and went with Sherman on the March to the Sea and through the Valley campaign, engaging with his regiment in all of the encounters with the enemy. While on the march they were once three days without rations, and subsisted on sassafras bark and whatever they could find. Horses and men dropped down on the way from hunger and thirst. About September 1864, Mr. Cook was taken sick and sent to the hospital at Baltimore, Maryland, from where he was discharged June 7, 1865. During the two years and ten months of his service Mr. Cook was actively engaged in many battles and skirmishes, and endured the hardships of many severe marches and other duties incident to the life of a soldier. He was assigned to special staff duty under General Duffy for a short time. He is present commander of C. B. Gambee Post, No. 33, G.A.R. October 22, 1844, he was born, in Seneca county, New York, a son of Elihu and Lurinda (Hall) Cook. He married December 2, 1873, Caoline Bauman, the ceremony taking place at Sandusky City, Ohio, where Mrs. Cook was born November 19, 1854. Her parents are Heronimus and Eva (Weiser) Bauman. Mr. Cook is now engaged in the restaurant business at Bellevue, Ohio.

John M. Corey, M.D.

Enlisted at Camp Dennison, Ohio, August 9, 1861, as a private in Company B, 49th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, McCook’s division, 4th army corps. The first promotion of Dr. Corey was to hospital steward, on November 1, 1861. In January, 1862, he was appointed acting assistant surgeon, United States Army. In the field, March 39, 1865, he was appointed surgeon United States Volunteers with rank of major, by President Lincoln, the appointment confirmed by the United States senate, and was stationed at Sandusky, Ohio. Dr. Corey engaged in the battles of Shiloh, Corinth, Dog Walk, Stone River, Liberty Gag, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Rocky Face Ridge, Tesaca, and the siege of Atlanta. He was never absent from a battle in which the 49th regiment was engaged until August 9, 1864, when he left the field for hospital service. He was assigned to special duty in the hospitals at Chattanooga, Tennessee, and was chief executive officer and in charge of the medical department of the 8th Kansas Regiment during December and January, 1863-4, at Knoxville, Tennessee; also medical officer for the 7th Wisconsin Regiment for a few days. From August, 1864, until October 1, 1865, Dr. Corey was in the hospital service in Ohio. December 31, 1862, at the battle of Stone River, Tennessee, he was captured by the enemy with about fifteen other surgeons and held for eight days. They were allowed to attend to the Union wounded, if properly sashed and flaged, but they all suffered from lack of food. After Rosecrans defeated Bragg they were recaptured by their own forces. At the end of three years in the field service and fourteen months in the hospital service in Ohio, Dr. Corey was discharged at Columbus, Ohio, in 1865. He is a member of the Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. John M. Corey was born in Austintown, Mahoning county, Ohio, January 21, 1837, a son of John and Harriet (MacMahan) Corey. He married at Fremont, Ohio, March 3, 1860, Elizabeth T. Steward. Mrs. Corey was born at Fremont, Ohio, May 6, 1841, the daughter of James and Mary (Tilton) Steward, and died March 24, 1881. The children of Dr. Corey were born: Mary J., in September, 1860, deceased; John T. Sherman, December 1, 1864; deceased; Wilbur Nott, November 1, 1872, deceased, and Rutherford B. Hayes, November 11, 1875, now living at Fremont, Ohio, where Dr. Corey is a physician and surgeon.

Conrad Cramer, Jr.

Became a member of Company G, 111th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, August 16, 1862. He enlisted at Fremont, Ohio, and his regiment was assigned to the 2d brigade, 2d division, 23d army corps. Mr. Cramer engaged with his regiment in the battles of Campbells Station, Knoxville, Stone River, Huffs Ferry and Strawberry Plains, Tennessee. He entered upon Sherman’s campaign from Rocky Face Ridge to Jonesboro, thirty miles beyond Atlanta, Georgia, taking part in all of the encounters with the enemy. In Thomas’ campaign against Hood in Tennessee, he was actively engaged in the battles of Columbia, Franklin and Nashville, and under Schofield in North Carolina, was present at the storming of Fort Anderson. He participated in twenty-five engagements and a great number of skirmishes. At Salisbury, North Carolina, May 25, 1865,he was assigned as guard at division headquarters, by order of Brigadier General Cooper, and performed this duty for one month. The 111th regiment went into he field with one thousand and eleven men and returned home with four hundred and one. With the exception of one month, when he was sick in the hospital at Lebanon, Kentucky, Mr. Cramer remained on active duty with his comrades during his two years and eleven months of service. He was discharged at Cleveland, Ohio, July 13, 1865. He belongs to Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. In Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, he was born June 14, 1844. His father is Conrad Cramer, sr., and his mother is Catherine (Miller) Cramer. He married in Sandusky county, Ohio, January 10, 1867, Hulda Swickard. Mrs. Cramer was born in Sandusky county, February 21, 1848, a daughter of Daniel and Harriet (Metzger) Swickard. Two children have been born to them, Francis Marion, January 16, 1868, and Leroy, November 28, 1872. Mr. Cramer resides at Fremont, Ohio, and is a merchant of that place.

Joseph DeMars

In the second year of the war, August, 1862, enlisted at Buffalo, New York, as a private in Company E, 1st New York Mounted Rifles. He was promoted to corporal and re-enlisted at Point of Rocks, Virginia, in August 1864, entering the same company. Mr. DeMars’ regiment went first to New York City, and thence to Norfolk, Virginia, by steamer. Proceeding to Suffolk, the regiment went into camp for a year. They engaged in several skirmishes here and were ordered to Williamsburg, where they remained six months and had many severe encounters with the guerrillas. The regiment then went to Petersburg, Virginia, and here Mr. DeMars remained until the end of his service. He was sick with that most painful malady, inflammatory rheumatism, from January 1, 1864,until July, 1864, and has never quite recovered. Mr. DeMars was born in Sandusky county, Ohio, August 31, 1834. His parents are both now dead. His father was Thomas DeMars and his mother Margaret (Bisnette) DeMars. He married in Sandusky county, in 1867, Delia E. Pete, born in Michigan, in 1845, the daughter of Lois and Ellen (Jacobs) Pete, the latter now deceased. Ten children were born to him: Charles L., James L., Edgar T., Clarissa V., Elizabeth A., Maria V., Mary O., Delia, Lucy, and Joseph. Mr. DeMars cultivates a farm near Fremont, Ohio.

Lorenzo Dick

Entered Company H, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as a private, enlisting at Premont, Ohio, October 15, 1861. The regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 1st division, 16th army corps. Mr. Dick was elected orderly sergeant by the men of his company in camp at Fremont, November 18, 1861. He veteranized January 1, 1864, at Germantown, Tennessee, entering the same company as first lieutenant. He had been commissioned second lieutenant April 6, 1862, at the battle of Shiloh, Tennessee, for meritorious conduct. Mr. Dick participated in the battles of Shiloh, siege of Corinth, Champion Hills, Jackson, Black River, and in all of the battles and skirmishes incident to the siege of Vicksburg, Mississippi. The first move of the regiment after veteranizing was to Paducah, Kentucky, where they drove out the enemy, and then went to Memphis, Tennessee. They soon after started on the Guntown expedition. Here they encountered the enemy, who had their lines drawn up in the shape of a horse-shoe, and into this trap the Union boys were led. Lieutenant Dick and about thirty men of his company were taken prisoners. They were first sent to Andersonville, and then to Macon, Georgia. Here Mr. Dick remained until the first of September. While in prison here he was commissioned captain, but did not know it till he reached home. He was sent to Charleston, South Carolina, and placed in a building called the workhouse, which was under fire from the Union guns. At the end of three weeks he was sent to Columbia, and was soon after exchanged and sent home on a thirty day furlough. By exposure in the field and privations during his prison life Mr. Dick contracted chronic diarrhea and rheumatism. His hearing is also impaired. He severed three years and seven months and was discharged at Fremont, May 15, 1865. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. Philip Mathias, a half brother, was on board of a boat while on service in Virginia. Mr. Dick was born in Erie county, New York, May 15, 1838, a son of Jacob and Catherine (Vogle) Dick. He married at Fremont, April 4, 1864 Catherine Renschler, born in Germany, September 27, 1841, the daughter of John and Mary (Eisenhart) Renschler. Their children were born: Lorenzo, January 8, 1965, died January 24, 1873; Charles F., October 25, 1866; Jacob, May 9, 1869; Katie, August 6, 1872; George, March 4, 1876, and Gertrude, December 12, 1882. Mr. Dick is engaged in business as a grocer in Fremont, Ohio.

Edward F. Dickinson

Enlisted at Fremont, Ohio, April 24, 1861, as first lieutenant in Company G, 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and reenlisted in the same for three years. The regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 3d division, 2d army corps. November 1, 1862, he was appointed quartermaster of his regiment. He engaged in the battles of Winchester, Virginia, Antietam, Maryland, and Fredericksburg, Viriginia. He is at present afflicted with asthma, contracted while in the service. July 14, 1864, Lieutenant Dickinson was discharged, having served three years and three months. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. He was born at Fremont, Ohio, January 21, 1829, a son of Rodolphus and Margaret (Beaugrand) Dickinson. On September 12, 1852, he married Henrietta R. Mitchner, born at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, November 21, 1831, the daughter of Pym Mitchner. They have three children who were born: Henry C., April 19, 1855, now residing at Socorro, New Mexico; Effie, April 23, 1859, and Margueritte, September 23, 1873. Mr. Dickinson received his education at Cincinnati, Ohio, and was admitted to the bar at a very early age, well qualified for his profession. He was prosecuting attorney in 1852, for two terms, and was elected probate judge in 1866, serving two years. In 1868 Judge Dickinson represented his district in Congress during one term. He has also been mayor of the city of Fremont, and held that office with distinction. He resides at Fremont, where he is an attorney-at-law.

Joseph Dilenschneider

Born in France, enlisted in the service of his adopted country May 21, 1861. He enrolled at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, as a private in Company B, 29th New York Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to Steinwehr’s brigade, Blenker’s division. He was appointed musician, and remained on this special duty during his service. At the battle of Cooks Farm, Virginia, February 2, 1862, Mr. Dilenschneider was wounded in the left thigh by a minie-ball. He was on picket duty at the time, and was shot by a rebel sharpshooter. He walked to the doctor’s quarters and had the ball extracted, and was sent to the division hospital for several weeks. He was transferred to the hospital at Washington, District of Columbia, and was discharged on a surgeon’s certificate of disability, May 21, 1862. At Rockville, Connecticut, December 23, 1863, he re-enlisted, entering Company C, 15th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. In November, 1864, he was attacked with chronic diarrhea, and was sent to the hospital at Morehead, North Carolina, where he remained until March, 1865, when he rejoined his regiment at New Berne, and was actively engaged with them until July 20, 1865, when he was discharged at Goldsboro, North Carolina, at the end of two years and seven months of military life. Mr. Dilenschneider draws a pension of two dollars a month for his wound and eight dollars for disability. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. He was born in Alsace, France, June 8, 1834, the son of Ludwig and Katherina (Berdol) Dilenschneider. He married, at Fremont, Ohio, April 18, 1870, Amelia Eugenia Staeger, who was born in Baden, Germany, September 22, 1848, the daughter of John H. and Fredericka (Shafer) Staeger. They have five children, who were born: Amelia Eugenia, June 11, 1871; Josephine F., March 17, 1873; Leonora F., January 13, 1875; Rutherford B. Hayes, November 13, 1876, and Robert Reno, September 15, 1883. Mr. Dilenschneider is a tailor at Fremont, Ohio.

James W. Donnel

Entered the service of his country at Fremont, Ohio, October 20, 1861. He enlisted as a private in Company I, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 2d brigade, 2d division, 15th army corps. Mr. Donnel was promoted to 2d lieutenant at Fremont, Ohio, January 13, 1862, by the vote of his company. He engaged in the battles of Shiloh, and Corinth. At the former, April 6, 1862, while the Union forces were being driven back, he was captured by the enemy and marched to the rear under the escort of two rebels. He was held a few hours and then managed to make his escape. Although the distance between the two lines was short, the dangers were so great that it took him some time to rejoin his company. He was with them, however, on the third day. During the siege of Corinth, Mississippi, which lasted one month, Mr. Donnel was in command of his company. They were under fire many times, but were fortunate enough not to lose a man. On the evacuation of the city by the enemy they took possession. After a service of one year Mr. Donnel was discharged at Memphis, Tennessee, October 10, 1862. He was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, December 1, 1828, the son of James and Rebecca (Steward) Donnel, both now deceased. He married, in Sandusky county, Ohio, December 27, 1848, Harriet Callahan, born in Columbiana county, Ohio, February 22, 1831. Her parents, both now deceased, were William and Elizabeth (Cook) Callahan. They have two children: John W., born April 27, 1850, living at Amsden, Seneca county, Ohio, and Alice, born December 24, 1859. Mr. Donnel resides at Helena, Ohio, where he is station agent and postmaster.

G. Lindon Donnels

Enlisted August 11, 1862, at Rollersville, Ohio. He enrolled as a private in Company A, 111th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and the regiment was assigned to the 2d brigade, 2d division, 23d army corps. Mr. Donnels engaged in the battles of Huffs Ferry, Campbells Station, siege of Knoxville, Strawberry Plains, Rocky Face Ridge, Recasa, Burnt Hickory, Kenesaw Mountain, Decatur, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Franklin and Nashville, Raleigh and Fort Anderson, besides a great many more, of more or less importance. He was once detached from his regiment and assigned to duty in the 24th Independent Batter of artillery. Several hours after he had but just dismounted when his horse was torn to pieces by a shell. On the same day they saw the rebels forming in front of them, but as their cannon were covered with canvas, they were supposed to be ambulances and the orders were not to fire. The enemy soon opened fire on them and they returned the compliment, but were obliged to retreat. The Union gunner dismounted the rebel battery, however. This same gunner was one of the finest shots in the service, and at one time, in Knoxville, he shattered the wheel of a wagon three miles away and moving. They had frequent encounters with General Cleburne’s command, and found them men well disciplined and hard to conquer. During the Nashville engagement the 23d corps was held in reserve. When the colonel gave the 111th the command to enter the battle they started on a double quick. The commander of the division told Colonel Moore to get his men in line. The colonel replied that that was “the way they fight in the west.” The men captured the fort. Mr. Donnels went frequently on foraging expeditions, and was always very successful in obtaining supplies and escaping capture. During three years Mr. Donnels served his country as a brave and faithful soldier. He was discharged at Salisbury June 27, 1865. He was born in Madison township, Sandusky county, Ohio, July 23, 1847, the son of Gilbert S. and Nancy (Wollcut) Donnels. He married, in his native township, August 1, 1867, Mary M. Bowser, born in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, November 9, 1846, the daughter of George and Rosana (Fickes) Bowser. Their children were born: Edwin M., June 8, 1868; Elmer A., January 19, 1870; Lester L., January 17, 1873; George J., September 30, 1874, and Bertha E., June 4, 1879. Mr. Donnels is a farmer and lives near Gibsonburg, Ohio.

William N. Donnels

Was under age when he enlisted in the service of his country. He enrolled at Fremont, Ohio, October 30, 1861, as a private in Company I, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. At Germantown, Tennessee, he veteranized January 1, 1864. Mr. Donnels took an active part in the battles at Corinth, Shiloh, Jackson, Vicksburg, Tishomingo, Tupelo, Nashbille, Spanish Fort, Mobile, and many other engagements. He was once detailed at division headquarters to take charge of the corral, and was sent many times on foraging and scouting expeditions. While sleeping in a cotton shed, with his comrades, he was injured by the falling of the building. A number of the men were hurt, and Mr. Donnels was caught by the legs under the timbers. He was rescued by his companions, but he has never entirely recovered from this accident. During four years he was actively engaged. He was never wounded or captured, and was never absent from his regiment. He was discharged at Columbus, Ohio, May 31, 1865. In Sandusky county, Ohio, December 1843 he was born, the son of Gilbert S. Donnels, now deceased, and Nancy (Wollcut) Donnels. He married in Madison township, Sandusky county, Ohio, February 17, 1866, Julia Aldrich. Mrs. Donnels was born in Sandusky county in 1844, the daughter of Nero and Ruth (Wheeler) Aldrich, the former now deceased. Their children were born: Eles W., November 21, 1866; Franklin D., July 9, 1869; Joy, July 28, 1871; and Bertie B., April 7 1874, died August 19, 1878. Mr. Donnels is engaged in farming, and resides near Gibsonburg, Ohio.

George Washington Drew

Left the comforts of home and enlisted as a private in Company E, 186th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He enrolled at Clyde, Ohio, February 15, 1865. The regiment belonged to the Flying Brigade. Mr. Drew was tendered the office of corporal but declined the promotion. He was in a series of engagements from Nashville to Murfreesboro, and from there to Cleveland, Tennessee, thence to Dalton, Georgia. The marches and countermarches of the regiment were continuous from March 11th until August 1st. Mr. Drew experienced the usual hardships connected with a short and sharp campaign in the field. He was detached and assigned to duty as commissary in the general hospital at Nashville from August 1 to September 5, 1865, being elected to the position out of a company of one hundred and twenty men. The election was for meritorious services in the field, such as refusing to enter the hospital when scarcely able to stand, and performing excessive and onerous guard duty. His general health was much impaired, and he consequently suffered more than the average soldier. At the end of nine months he was discharged at Columbus, Ohio, his papers dating September 15, 1865. Mr. Drew was born in Monroe, Michigan, March 27, 1835. His parents are James T. and Almira (Owens) Drew. He married at Genoa, Ohio, April 8, 1859, Elenora E. Moore, born in Hancock county, Ohio, in 1840, the daughter of Samuel and Mary (Miller) Moore. Their children were born: Eugene H., February 15, 1861; Franklin P., September 10, 1863, deceased; Charles L., October 16, 1864, deceased; Nora E. August 15, 1866, now residing at Tiffin, Ohio; Burdel, May, 1868, living at Tiffin; Samuel A., October 8, 1869; and Lessa, May 12, 1878, deceased. Mr. Drew is a farmer, and resides at Clyde, Ohio.

Theodore F. Edwards

Enlisted as a member of Company I, 12th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, October 12, 1863. The regiment was in service as part of Stoneman’s cavalry division. Mr. Edwards engaged in battles at Mount Stirling, Kentucky, and Saltville, Virginia. He was on detached duty as teamster of his regiment during the first part of his service. At the battle of Saltville, his horse fell with him and severely injured his wrist. He was sent to the hospital at Lexington, Kentucky, and remained under the care of Surgeon Stillman from December, 1864, until the close of the war. He was discharged at Lexington in 1865, after a service of nearly two years. Two brothers of Mr. Edwards, Tobias M. and Hezekiah, served in the late war. The former enlisted in Company G., 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and sacrificed his life at the battle of Winchester, Virginia, March 22, 1862. The latter was discharged at Camp Chase in September, 1862, from Company D, 3d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He now resides at Ballville, Ohio, and draws a pension of four dollars a month for his services. Theodore F. Edwards was born in Ballville Township, October 10, 1844, a son of Joseph F. and Mary (Miller) Edwards. He married at Fremont, in September, 1867, Ellen P. Neff, born in Ballville Township, the daughter of Benjamin F. Neff. Their only son, William C., was born June 25, 1869. Mr. Edwards owns a fine farm of seventy six acres, situated about four and one-half miles north of Fremont, Ohio, on the east side of the Sandusky River. It lies in a beautiful country, and is a part of an old estate given to one Williams by the government, on being liberated by the Indians.

David Smyth Elder

Enlisted at Tiffin, Ohio, August 20, 1861. He entered Company D, 49th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as a private. The regiment was assigned to McCook’s division, Army of the Ohio. Mr. Elder left Camp Dennison, Ohio, with his regiment, and went into Kentucky, remaining about three months at Camp Nevin and Munfordville, then removing to Nashville, Tennessee. During two weeks they drilled and recruited, and then marched to Duck River, Tennessee, thence to Savannah on the Tennessee river; by steam transport they reached Shiloh, and on April 7, 1862, they engaged in the battle, being under fire from nine o’clock in the morning till four in the afternoon. Mr. Elder was detailed on that night to take charge of some of the wounded; two were from his company. He accompanied them to Mound City, Illinois, and remained there in the capacity of hospital nurse for four weeks. He was then ordered to Camp Dennison to serve in the same capacity. He was attacked with chronic diarrhea, and going home on a thirty days furlough, was at the end of that time discharged on a surgeon’s certificate of disability, September 1862. Mr. Elder also served four months in Company I, 164th Ohio National Guards, enlisting May 9, 1864, at Cleveland, and discharged at Cleveland, September 20, 1864. He had served in the army one year and nine months. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32 G.A.R. Henry Stoner, a brother of Mrs. Elder, was a captain in the 51st Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He was killed in front of Atlanta, Georgia, and was buried on the field of battle near where he sacrificed his life for his country. Mr. Elder was born in Centre County, Pennsylvania, April 6, 1842, a son of John and Nancy (Smyth) Elder. He married at Tiffin, February 14, 1867, Laura Stoner, born in Seneca County, October 18, 1847, the daughter of Henry and Elizabeth (Flaugher) Stoner. Mr. Elder is the proprietor of a bakery at Fremont, Ohio.

Henry Edward Elliott

Enrolled as a soldier, August 16, 1861, at Clyde, Ohio. He entered, as a private, Company K, 65th New York Volunteer Infantry, and the regiment was assigned to the 4th brigade, 3d division, 6th army corps. Mr. Elliott first encountered the enemy at Seven Pines, May 31, 1862, and at Fair Oaks June 1st. At the battle of Malvern Hill he was under fire for sixteen hours. The regiment lay at Harrisons Landing until August 12th, and then marched to Alexandria, thence to Fairfax Station, thence through Maryland to meet the enemy at Antietam. After the battle here they remained four or five weeks and then moved to Warrenton, Virginia, where McClellan was relieved and superseded by Burnside. The army then went to Fredericksburg, and were obliged to retreat. Recrossing the Rappahannock River, they encamped, and Burnside, at his own request, was superseded by Hooker. They next went to Brandon Station, and thence to Johnsons Island, Ohio, where they acted as guard for prisoners. Returning to Brandon, they were under General Grant, and marched to Goldmine Ford, where they had an engagement, thence to Spotsylvania C.H. Here, on May 9, 1864, the commander of the division was killed, and on the next day Mr. Elliott received a wound in the right thigh. He was sent to the hospital at Washington, District of Columbia. In June he was removed to Davids Island, New York harbor, but the deaths were so numerous that all who were able to go were removed to the Sisters of Charity hospital at Buffalo. Mr. Elliott went home, and at the end of twenty-six days rejoined his company at Berryville, Maryland. They were ordered to Winchester, encountered the enemy and drove them to Strasburg, where they gained a victory, and went thence to Woodstock. Mr. Elliott’s time being up, he reluctantly left his comrades, and was discharged at New York in July, 1864, having completed a term of service of three years and four months. He was born in Beaver County, Pennsylvania, July 29, 1823, a son of George and Eliza (McConkey) Elliott. He married, at Republic, Ohio, April 25, 1850, Lucy Fellows, born in New York State, January 23, 1830, the daughter of Erastus and Eliza (Walter) Fellows. Their children were born: Lucy E., August 17, 1851; Theresa A., February 7, 1853; Henrietta E, March 6, 1855; Joel B., March 6, 1857; Lucy May, April 5, 1859; Lina, March 4, 1862; Jennie, November 30, 1866. Mr. Elliott is a carpenter, and resides in Clyde, Ohio.

Frederick Emch

Was a member of Company G. 37th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He enlisted at Woodville, Ohio, as a private, and shared with his regiment their marches and engagements. Mr. Emch took an active part in the battles at Princeton, West Virginia, and at Fayettesville, in the same State. At the latter engagement the 37th suffered greatly, losing over four hundred men. The regiment was surrounded by the enemy, and the men cut their way through the rebel lines. Mr. Emch was detailed as teamster at Fayetteville, and the train to which he belonged became separated from the main force by the rebel cavalry. He realized that it would be impossible to save his entire team and, cutting his horses loose from the wagon, he mounted and made his escape. The rest of the train was captured. Mr. Emch was born in Switzerland, September 17, 1831, a son of Durs and Elizabeth (Bumgardner) Emch. He married in Sandusky County, Ohio, February 20, 1863, Christina Rohdert, who was born in Sandusky County, April 28, 1843, the daughter of Gaspard and Mary (Bruning) Rohdert, both now deceased. Their children were born: Mary, February 2, 1864, died on the 11th of the same month; Dora L. H., February 16, 1865; Henrietta J., July 2, 1871; and Frederick J. H., February 23, 1877. The first wife of Mr. Emch was Margaret (Hoffman) Emch. They had two children: Matilda E., born December 15, 1853, now residing at Toledo; and Amelia H., born October 5, 1857, died February 13, 1863. Mr. Emch resides at Woodville, where he is engaged in business as a gunsmith.

Josiah Fairbank

Entered the service as a private, enlisting at Fremont, Ohio, October 20, 1861. He enrolled as a member of Company I, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. His regiment was assigned to the 2d brigade, 2d division, 15th army corps. Mr. Fairbank received many well deserved promotions. He was appointed sergeant, and April 9, 1864, commissioned 2d lieutenant. November 16, 1864, he was promoted to 1st lieutenant, and to the captaincy of his company May 31, 1865. He never missed a duty, and was never absent from an engagement in which his regiment took a part, except during his imprisonment. He participated in the battles of Shiloh, siege of Corinth, Vicksburg, Tupelo, Tishomingo Crook, Brandon, Guntown, and many other engagements of more or less note. When his company was organized he recruited eighteen men, but went out with them as a private. He was assigned to special duty to recruit men for the regiment, and recruited thirty. He was taken prisoner June 12, 1864, and held nine months in various prisons. One month less than four years he served in the Union army, and was discharged at Vicksburg, Mississippi, September 20, 1865. Captain Fairbank was born in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, December 30, 1834, a son of Josiah and Charlotte (Twing) Fairbank. He married in Medina County, Ohio, October 20, 1828, the daughter of Christopher and Sovina (Shafer) Bowman, borht new deceased. Their children were born: Lewis H., February 20, 1847; George, December 24, 1848, died March 2, 1849; Francis, October 31, 1850; Armenia, September 3, 1852; Charles W., October 18, 1855; and Christopher C., September 29, 1858. Mr. Fairbank is a carpenter and contractor, and resides at Helena, Ohio.

Jonathan Faler

On the 28th of August, 1864, enlisted as a private in Company A, 177th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He went with his regiment to the front and participated in the battle of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. He also took part in the encounter with the enemy of Town Creek, North Carolina. The campaign during this time was full of hardships and dangers, which Mr. Faler shared with his comrades for eleven months. He was discharged at Greensboro, North Carolina, June 24, 1865. He was born in Pennsylvania, January 10, 1821, a son of George and Eva (Houts) Faler, both now deceased. He married at Woodville, December 24, 1843, Catherine Swortsman, born in Pennsylvania, March 31, 1829, the daughter of Paul and Mary (Moore) Swortsman, both since deceased. Their children were born: Mary A., October 23, 1844, living in Hancock County, Ohio; Margaret H., February 8, 1846, died October 29, 1850; Louisa A., July 30, 1849, living in Ottawa County, Ohio; George W., August 7, 1851, died May 16, 1872; John H., November 18, 1853; Lovina A., January 23, 1856, residing in Seneca County; Isaac, June 13, 1858; Charles W., May 15, 1861, died May 29, 1865; Emma O., February 22, 1864; Nelson, December 13, 1866; Jonathan D., March 13, 1869; and Delias, October 3, 1871, died November 18, 1871. Mr. Faler resides at Woodville, where he is a prosperous carpenter and contractor.

Benjamin H. Fausey

Served his country long and well. He enlisted at Tiffin, Ohio, August 12, 1861, as a private in Company B, 49th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 3d division, 4th army corps. Mr. Fausey received many promotions for meritorious services. He first became duty sergeant, then orderly sergeant, and then received the rank of 1st lieutenant. At Strawberry Plains, January 1, 1864, he re-enlisted, entering the same company as duty sergeant. He participated in the battles of Shiloh, Tennessee, Stone River, Resaca, Rocky Face Ridge, Corinth, Mississippi, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Nashville, Tennessee, and many other engagements and skirmishes of more or less note. He was frequently detailed on foraging expeditions, and while in the performance of this duty engaged in many severe encounters with the enemy. During the battle of Stone River, Tennessee, December 31, 1862, Mr. Fausey was struck by a minie ball and knocked down. On regaining consciousness he discovered that his comrades had fallen back and the rebels were in the possession of the field. He with 900 others was taken prisoners and carried toward Vicksburg but the Confederates, hearing that Grant had opened fire on the city, sent the prisoners to Libby Prison. Here they were almost starved, but were paroled not long afterward. Mr. Fausey rejoined his command, which was stationed about a mile from where he had been captured. At the end of four years and six months he was discharged at Columbus, Ohio, January 1, 1866. He was born in Sandusky County, Ohio, April 30, 1836, a son of William and Elizabeth (Poats) Fausey. In his native county, on October 3, 1869, he married Rebecca Shively. Mrs. Fausey was born in Sandusky County, October 20, 1843, the daughter of Daniel and Catherine (Miller) Shively, the latter deceased. Their children were born: Helena C. June 6, 1871; Rosa E., September 2, 1874; Daisy E., October 13, 1876; Iler B., April 9, 1883. Mr. Fausey is a farmer and resides near Rollersville, Sandusky County, Ohio.

Edward Ferrenberg

Served nine months in the Union army, and then re-enlisted September 1, 1864, at Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. He enrolled as a private in Company G, 205th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. In the battles of Fredericksburg, Antietam, and Sherman’s march to the Sea, besides many other engagements of his regiment, he performed his duty with bravery and was a faithful soldier. In the battle of Fort Stedman, Virginia, March 25, 1865, he was wounded by a fragment of shell which struck him in the breast. He served his country for eighteen months and was honorably discharged at Alexandria, June 2, 1865. The hardships of his life as a soldier unfitted him for labor and brought on disease, from which he died at Bettsville, May 14, 1876. Although entitled to a pension his family have never received one, probably on account of the inefficiency of their agent. Mr. Ferrenberg was born in Huntington County, Pennsylvania, September 20, 1842, a son of Robert and Mary (Slate) Ferrenberg. He married at Mercersburg, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, July 11, 1864, Catherine E. Hammel. Mrs. Ferrenberg was born in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, October 18, 1842, the daughter of Thomas and Mary (Spannuth) Hammel. Four children were born to them: Gurletta E., May 28, 1866; Mary L. January 5, 1868; Laura M., January 19, 1870; and Olive A., April 10, 1872 -- all residing at home. The widow of Mr. Ferrenberg now resides at Gibsonburg, Ohio.

Thomas H. Fisher

Left his home and enlisted as a private in Company B, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He enrolled at Fremont, Ohio, February 23, 1864. His regiment was then in service in the 2d brigade, 2d division, 15th army corps. June 10, 1864, at Guntown, Mississippi, Mr. Fisher first encountered the enemy. Here, with many others, he was taken prisoner. He was confined in Andersonville prison for three months, where he endured great privations. Their rations were half pint of dry corn meal each day and two ounces of bacon and first, and then two inches square of corn bread. Some days they received nothing to eat. At the end of three months they were taken out to be exchanged, but General Sherman would only exchange for those of his own command, and Mr. Fisher was left behind. He and two comrades made their escape soon after this. For twelve days they lived by begging their living from the poor colored people, who were very good to them. They were then recaptured and taken to Millen, Georgia, where for two months and a half they fared as they did at Andersonville. Mr. Fisher was then sent to Savannah and exchanged. He went to Annapolis, Maryland, and came home for a short time. He returned to Columbus, Ohio, and remained until discharged, June 15, 1865, at the end of fifteen months of faithful service. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. In Sandusky County, Ohio, December 10, 1836, he was born, a son of William and Mary (McCullough) Fisher. He married at Fremont, Ohio, January 24, 1861, Mary A. Thirwechter, born in Pennsylvania, March 24, 1840, the daughter of Samuel and Mary (Groh) Thirwechter. Their children were born: John Calvin, September 14, 1861, died March 4, 1867; Sarah E., August 11, 1863, died September 27, 1964; William A., October 12, 1865; Olive M., April 9, 1867; Florence B., March 18, 1870; Dora A. July 22, 1871; Cora E., July 22, 1871, died August 3, 1876; Harry F., November 8, 1874; Thomas O., September 17, 1878; and Ray J., June 14, 1880. Mr. Fisher is a farmer and resides near Fremont, Ohio .

Charles M. Fouke

A few days after the firing on Fort Sumter, enlisted as a member of Company F, 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was elected 1st lieutenant by the men of his company and commissioned as such April 19, 1861. He re-enlisted at Camp Dennison, Ohio, in the same company, which was sent to West Virginia, to join General Hill’s command. Mr. Fouke engaged with his regiment in all of their marches and encounters with the enemy, with the exception of several months when he was detailed on special service. December, 1861, he was stationed at the recruiting depot at Cincinnati, Ohio, under Major McRea, and remained here recruiting until this service was closed in May. He rejoined his regiment at Fredericksburg, Virginia, and completed a service of one year and nine months. He was honorably discharged at Washington, District of Columbia. Mr. Fouke is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. He was born in Fauquier County, Virginia, March 3, 1829. His parents are Joseph E. and Naomi (Showers) Fouke. At Fremont, Ohio, February 1, 1858, he was united in marriage to Amelia Vandercook. Mrs. Fouke was born in Huron County, Ohio, March 6, 1840, the daughter of Abraham F. and Mary (Forsyth) Vandercook. Their family consists of one daughter and three sons: Metia A. was born October 17, 1862, and resides at Fremont; Charles V. was born July 26, 1865, and lives at Omaha, Nebraska; Louis E. was born February 7, 1870; and John W., January 13, 1873. Mr. Fouke is a printer and resides at Fremont, Ohio.

William A. Francis

Enlisted at Fremont, Ohio, in 1861, as a private in Company F, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He veteranized with his regiment, which belonged to the 1st brigade, 1st division, 16th army corps. The first engagement of the regiment was at Pittsburg Landing. General Johnston with his army went to the Union camp on Sunday morning, April 6, 1862, and attempted to capture it. The men escaped to the Tennessee river and at night General Buell came with reinforcements. The following day the enemy retreated leaving their dead and wounded on the field. Mr. Francis was detailed to assist in burying the dead. His regiment then joined in the pursuit of the rebels to Corinth. Here they were employed in building breastworks. Mr. Francis was taken sick and entered the hospital for four weeks. The rebels burnt their warehouses and provisions before vacating Corinth and the Union army followed them to Memphis, Tennessee. Here Mr. Francis and his comrades camped and fortified remaining about three months. They were then ordered on the march and had several severe skirmishes with the enemy, at Germantown taking a large number of prisoners. Starting for Vicksburg they found they could not reach their destination and went to Jackson. They encountered the enemy and charging on them through a hedge fence, captured the entire force without the loss of a single man. During more than four years Mr. Francis was in the service of his country. He was discharged at Columbus, Ohio, September 26, 1865. His brother James enlisted in the same company. He was wounded by a rebel telegraph operator who fired on him from the top of a tree. His enemy soon descended from his station, however, his gun following him. The husband of Mr. Francis’ second wife, was also in the same company of the 72d regiment. He died in the army. William A. Francis was born in France, February 2, 1838, a son of Joseph and Louisa Josephine Francis. He married at Fremont, Ohio, October 14, 1870, Mary E. (Paden) Smith, daughter of Jacob and Tabitha R. (Smart) Paden. Two children were born to them: Elizabeth, November 1, 1873, died December 7, 1879; and J. W., born January 29, 1877. The first wife of Mr. Francis was Alice Paden who died in 1870. The children of this marriage were born: William, October 24, 1860; Henry A., November 4, 1864; Sherman C., July 20, 1868; Franklin S., July 10, 1870. Mr. Francis is a carpenter and resides at Clyde, Ohio.

Oratus S. French

Enlisted in December, 1863. He reported at the Navy Yard, Brooklyn, for examination as an engineer. He received the rank of 2d assistant engineer, and his orders from the secretary of the navy, Honorable Gideon Wells, to report to Admiral Gregory, at New York, for duty on board the United States steamer Admiral. He reported on January 20, 1864, and was assigned to take charge of the engines. The steamer was a supply steamer of two hundred tons burthen. Mr. French made nine round trips on board of her in this important duty. He was then, March 7, 1865, ordered to proceed to Boston and report to Rear Admiral Stringham, Commandant, United States steamer Yucca. On board of this vessel he had full charge of the engineers department. During the first three months of his duty on board of theYucca they were engaged in blockading the mouth of the Chattahoncha river. They then assisted in clearing Mobile Bay of torpedoes and other obstructions. On the 1st of January, 1865, they were ordered to Pensacola Bay where they vessel was laid up for repairs and Mr. French went home on a two months furlough. He was discharged at the end of a service of two years and eight months on the 20th of April, 1866. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post No. 32, G.A.R. Mr. French was born in Painesville, Ohio, November 25, 1838. His parents are Warren and Amanda ( Richmond ) French. He resides at Fremont, Ohio, and his occupation is that of mechanical engineer.

Henry Friar

On October 15, 1861, enlisted in Scott township, Sandusky county, Ohio, as a private in Company I, 72d division, 15th army corps. On the 2d of May, 1864, he reenlisted at Fremont, Ohio, as a member of Company G, 169th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The battle of Shiloh, Tennessee, was the most sever encounter with the enemy that Mr. Friar experienced. After fighting for two days he was wounded by the explosion of a shell which killed two comrades near him and destroyed one of his eyes and injured the other. The enemy were retreating the throwing shells as they went. Company I had been ordered to lie down and the shots were passing harmlessly over them when they were ordered to get up. They had scarcely obeyed when the shell struck them. Mr. Friar walked back some distance and was then carried to the rear. His wound was dressed and he remained in the hospital six weeks; then he went home. he was soon after discharged at Columbus, Ohio . His second enlistment was on account of his younger brother, whom he did not wish to see enter the army alone. Their duty in the 169th regiment was garrison duty at Fort Ethan Allen near Washington, District of Columbia . Mr. Friar was discharged at Camp Cleveland, Ohio, September 4, 1864. He served his country as a brave and faithful soldier during thirteen months. January 12, 1842, he was born in Sandusky county, Ohio, a son of Frederick and Angeline (Stinecamp) Friar. In his native county, November 15, 1866, he married Rebecca Sampsel, born in Sandusky county, December 23, 1846, the daughter of George and Ann Mary (Dick) Sampsel. They have three children who were born: Minnie M., October 12, 1867; Ira Berdel, August 1, 1875, and Clifford S., July 2, 1880. Mr. Friar is a farmer and resides near Gibsonburg, Ohio .

Louis Friar

Was too young to enlist at the beginning of the war but when he was sixteen years old he entered the service of his country. He enrolled at Fremont, Ohio, May 2, 1864, as a private in Company G, 169th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was a brave and faithful soldier and shared in all of the duties of his regiment during the four months of his life in the army. He was honorably discharged at Cleveland, Ohio, September 4, 1864. He died at his home, July 10th, 1883m of disease contracted while in the service. On February 15, 1848, he was born in Ohio, a son of Frederick and Angeline (Stinecomb) Friar. He married at Tiffin, Ohio, May 28, 1874, Anne M. Blausey. Mrs. Friar was born in Ohio, June 5, 1852, the daughter of Henry and Mary (Yeasting) Blausey. They had two children: Clara E., born April 26, 1875; John W., March 10, 1879, both residing with their mother. The first wife of Mr. Friar was Barbara (Ortz) Friar, and one child, Frank E., was born to them in January, 1872. Mr. Friar was engaged in business as overseer of the lime manufactories and resided near Gibsonburg, Ohio .

Francis A. Fry

Though not a native of America, enlisted in defense of the good cause, February 21, 1865. He entered Company B, 2d Ohio Veteran Volunteer Calvary, at Sandusky, as a private. The engagements in which Mr. Fry took part occurred in Missouri, and the Cherokee territory in that region. He ended a service of seven months and ten days when he was discharged at Benton Barracks, Missouri, September 7, 1865. He is a member of C.B. Gambee Post No. 33, G.A.R. In England Mr. Fry was a member of the Farnham Rifle corps for two years and it was there he learned to drill. He was born at Farnham, Surry county, England, July 29, 1841, a son of William and Ann (White) Fry. He married at Bellevue, Ohio, December 17, 1877, Elizabeth Tickner, born in Lower Canada, the daughter of William and Jane (Atkins) Tickner. They have three children who were born: Charles, October 12, 1879; Ralph, February 17, 1881; and Ray J., March 27, 1883. The first wife of Mr. Fry was Martha (Gifford) Fry, whom he married at Norwalk, Ohio, January 25, 1869. Their two children were born: Willie Gifford, January 21, 1870; and Oscar O., October 27, 1871. Mr. Fry is the cemetery sexton at Bellevue, Ohio .

Henry Frymire

When not twenty years of age, enlisted at Woodville, Ohio, in January, 1864. He entered, as a private, Company L, 3d Ohio Veteran Volunteer Calvary. The regiment was assigned to the 2d brigade, 2d division, 4th army corps. Mr. Frymire engaged in the siege of Atlanta, Georgia, the battles at Selma and Woodville, Alabama, and in many small engagements, where the cavalry was used on flanks. He also participated in the raids, reconnoiters and picket duty, which largely employed the regiment. June 12, 1864, near Columbus, Tennessee, while guarding a lot of negroes who were destroying the railroad, to prevent Hood’s forces from passing, Mr. Frymire was wounded in the hand by a bushwhacker. Although the wound was slight it was very painful, and he was unfitted for duty for several weeks. After one year and seven months of service, he was discharged, August 4, 1865, at Edgefield, Tennessee . He is a member of Eugene Rawson, Post, No. 32, G.A.R. In Lorain county, Ohio, he was born March 30, 1845, a son of Alonzo and Ann (Bacer) Frymire. He married in Sandusky county, October 29, 1873, Elizabeth Down, born in Sandusky county, December 8, 1852, the daughter of Daniel and Julia Ann (Burket) Down. Their children were born: Edward, January 7, 1875, died August 14, 1877; Delbert, October 3, 1878, died June 8, 1883; and Charles Isadore, February 22, 1884. Mr. Frymire is a teamster and resides in Fremont, Ohio .

John J. Gainer

Served his country long and well. He enlisted in Morrow County, Ohio, December 1, 1861, as a private in Company E, 43d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He re-enlisted in November, 1863, entering the same regiment and company. In the battles of Corinth, Mississippi, Atlanta, Georgia, and Shiloh, Tennessee, Mr. Gainer took an active part. He was once slightly wounded. From the beginning of the war until its close he served with his regiment as a faithful and brave soldier, enduring many hardships and privations. In July, 1865, at the end of a military life of three years and six months, he was discharged at Louisville, Kentucky . His health was ruined, but he did not ask help from his country until he found that he must die and leave his family unprovided for. An application for a pension that was well deserved was made at Washington, but his widow has received no compensation from the government yet. Mr. Gainer was a member of Canfield Post, No. 124, G.A.R. He was born in Germany, February 9, 1840, and died May 23, 1883. His parents are Christopher and Elizabeth (Lemler) Gainer. In Richland County, Ohio, October 31, 1865, he married Mary Jane Streby. Mrs. Gainer was born in Richland County, September 15, 1844, the daughter of John and Lucy (Grimes) Streby. Their children were born: Olive M., October 31, 1866; Horatio S., June 14, 1869; Agnes I., November 4, 1872; Sadie M., September 26, 1875; and Katie A., June 3, 1878, died August 27, 1879. Mr. Gainer was a farmer before his enlistment and resided near Gibsonburg, Ohio .

David Garn

Enlisted at Fremont, Ohio, May 2, 1864. He entered, as a musician, Company G, 169th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. His company went by train to Cleveland, Ohio, and thence via Harrisburg, Baltimore and Washington, District of Columbia, to Fort Ethan Allen, Virginia, where he remained until ordered to Cleveland . Here he was discharged, having serve four months, September 4, 1864. He has never entirely recovered from disease contracted while in the army. At Fort Ethan Allen, June 24, 1864, he was sunstruck, and was afterward attacked with camp fever and chronic diarrhea. He has made application for a pension. Mr. Garn is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. His brother, Alexander, was a soldier in Company I, 72d Ohio Volunteer infantry. He engaged in all the battles of his regiment until October 23, 1862, at which date he died of chronic diarrhea at Fort Pickering, Tennessee . He was buried in the south, but Major Fickes had his remains sent home. David Garn was born in Sandusky County, June 3, 1846, a son of David Garn, deceased in February, 1848, and Margaret (Ickes) Garn. He married in Sandusky County, January 20, 1884, Annie Hoffman, born at Hagerstown, Maryland, August 10, 1864, the daughter of Jacob and Johanna (Lesher) Hoffman. Mr. Garn is a merchant at Helena, Ohio, and holds the office of notary public. He has previously occupied the offices of precinct assessor, school director, clerk of the board of public schools, and road supervisor.

John Ginther

In the first year of the war, on June 4th, enlisted as a private in Company G, 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, at Fremont, Ohio . The regiment was assigned to the 3d brigade, 2d division, 2d army corps. Mr. Ginther shared with his regiment in its marches and entered with it into the battles of Romney, Winchester, Strasburg, Front Royal, Harrisons Landing, Port Republic, Antietam, Chancellorsville, Fredericksburg, and Gettysburg . During this latter battle, lasting from July 1st to 3d of 1863, Mr. Ginther was wounded. A ball entered his right shoulder, passed down his side and lodged near the kidneys. While trying to take off his trappings he was wounded in the left hand and shoulder, thus crippling both shoulders. He was actively engaged in the army for three years, and was discharged at Baltimore, Maryland . He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. He was born in Germany, September 22, 1835, a son of John and Barbara (Deninger) Ginther. In Fremont, Ohio, he was united in marriage to Olivia Romer. Mrs. Ginther was born in Baden, Germany, May 9, 1840, the daughter of Ignatius and Elinora (Gries) Romer. They have a family consisting of three daughters and three sons who were born: Mary Barbara, September 1, 1867; John Frank, July 16, 1869; Agatha, October 12, 1870; Joseph, June 25, 1872; Andrew Jacob, July 11, 1876; and Elinora Anna, June 9, 1880. Mr. Ginther is prosperously engaged in the restaurant business at Fremont, Ohio .

Henry Glenn

Entered Company A, 3d Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, enlisting at Monroeville, Ohio, September 4, 1861, as a private. He re-enlisted at Marion, Ohio, August 4, 1862, entering Company E, 96th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Mr. Glenn engaged in the battles at Shiloh, Chickasaw Bluff, Arkansas Post, Vicksburg, Jackson, Sabine Cross Roads, Spanish Fort, Mobile, Alabama, and many other engagements. He was detailed on special duty on several occasions. At the battle of Sabine Cross Roads he drove the headquarters ambulance. Brigadier-General E. J. Ransom was in command, and was wounded. Mr. Glenn carried him to Red River Landing. At Chickasaw Bluff he also drove the ambulance. He was assigned to duty as hospital steward at Nicholasville, Kentucky . At General Burbridge’s headquarters he acted as guard. During his service of three years and ten months Mr. Glenn traveled on foot one thousand, six hundred and eighty-three miles, and by rails, water and riding, ten thousand, one hundred and thirty-three miles, making a total of eleven thousand, eight hundred and sixteen miles. He was discharged at Mobile, Louisiana, July 7, 1865. He belongs to C. B. Gambee Post, No. 33, G.A.R. A brother of the subject of our sketch was a faithful and brave soldier of the 3d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was wounded at the battle of Murfreesboro, and died from the amputation of his leg. Henry Glenn was born in Waldo Township, Marion County, Ohio, June 17, 1844, a son of Thomas and Susan ( Berry ) Glenn. He married at Bellevue, Ohio, April 1, 1869, Hannah Haembauch, born in Lyrie township, Huron county, Ohio, May 30,1848, the daughter of Peter and Hannah (Leppley) Haembauch. Their children were born: Jesse H., February 24, 1873; infant son, on the same date, died two days later; infant, April 5, 1879, died the same day; Medea Pearl, May 15, 1884. Mr. Glenn is now engaged in the peaceful occupation of farming, near Bellevue, Ohio .

Gilbert Gordon

Entered the 55th Ohio Volunteer Infantry as a private in Company E, November 1, 1861, at Green Springs, Ohio.l The regiment was assigned to the 3d brigade, 2d division, 11th army corps. The battles into which Mr. Gordon entred with his regiment were those of Moorefield, Romney, West Virginia; Cross Keys, Port Republic, Strasburg, Franklin, Cedar Mountain, second Bull Run, Chancellorsville, Virginia; Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, and Sherman’s campaign from Rocky Face Ridge to Atlanta. Then joined in the March to the Sea. Mr. Gordon belonged to the pioneer corps, and as such was detailed to bring in supplies. While on a foraging expedition with a comrade, November 11, 1864, at Louisville, Georgia, they were taken prisoners by some of the 56th Alabama mounted infantry. They were taken to Augusta, and each received a hardtack and nothing more for four days. They were held at Florence, South Carolina, until the latter part of January, 1865, and were then sent to Wilmington, North Carolina, to be exchanged. About April 1st they were sent to Annapolis, Maryland, and thence to Camp Chase . Mr. Gordon was granted a furlough for thirty days and went home. He returned to Camp Chase, and was discharged May 24, 1865, having served three years and five months. Mr. Gordon still suffers from weakness and general debility caused by his hardships during his prison life. He was assigned to special duty at the headquarters of the 20th corps as a pioneer, and also at the headquarters of the 11th corps as a mason. During the raid under General Sigel from Cedar Mountain to Bull Run he marched twenty-two successive days and nights without taking off his cartridge box. What rest they obtained was as they slept on their arms. Mr. Gordon is a charter member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. William H. Allbee, brother of Mrs. Gordon, was a member of Company D, 3d Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. He died at Fremont, his home, in November, 1861, of disease contracted in the service. Gilbert Gordon was born in Erie County, Ohio, April 27, 1835, a son of Abel and Esther (Metcalf) Gordon. He married at Fremont, Ohio, March 19, 1866, Elizabeth L., Allbee, who was born in Chautauqua County, New York, March 18, 1837, the daughter of Eleazer and Almeda Allbee. They have three adopted children, born: Dora A., October 28, 1861, residing at Crawford, Wyandot County, Ohio ; Howard Gilbert, September 9, 1869; and Mina Emma, September 5, 1873. The first wife of Mr. Gordon was Mary Ann (Grubs) Gordon. Their children were born: Oliver, August 30, 1857; and Isabella, August 7, 1859. Mr. Gordon resides in Fremont, Ohio .

Bradley Gould

Answered his country’s call and enlisted in August, 1862, at Fremont, Ohio, as a private in Company G, 111th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. His regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 2d division, 23d army corps. During the two years and eight months of his life in the army Mr. Gould was engaged in eleven hard fought battles and two sieges, besides numerous skirmishes. He was an active participant in the battles of Loudon and Knoxville, Tennessee, Buzzard Roost, Georgia, and Burnt Hickory, in the same State. During the last named engagement he was wounded. A ball struck him in the right shoulder, broke his collar bone, passed into his neck, close to the jugular vein, and came out through his left eye, destroying the sight. From the effects of this wound his memory became impaired. Since 1867 a pension has been granted him by the government. He was discharged from the service in the fall of 1865, at Camp Dennison, Ohio . In Green Creek Township, Sandusky County, Ohio, he was born December 25, 1842, a son of Solomon and Martha (Tuttle) Gould. He married, at Clyde, Ohio, October 14, 1874, Elmina Warner. Mrs. Gould was born at Bellevue, Ohio, October 5, 1851, the daughter of L.C. and Harriet (Ross) Warner. Mr. Gould is now almost totally disabled by reason of wounds. He resides at Clyde, Ohio .

John Grubs

Gave his services to his country December 8, 1861. He enlisted at Green Springs, Ohio, as a member of Company A, 55th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. In January, 1864, Mr. Grubs veteranized. He participated in eleven severe battles and a number of skirmishes. Among the most hotly contested engagements were: Bull Run, Stone River, Gettysburg, Chickamauga and Nashville . At the battle at Cumberland Gap he experienced much hardship and many narrow escapes. In the retreat to Nashville Mr. Grubs was overcome with the heat, and was never in good health from that time until his death. During three months, in 1863, he was assigned to hospital duty. Three years and seven months he was a brave and faithful soldier and was discharged at Cleveland, Ohio, July 19, 1864. He was a member of the old G.A.R. post at Clyde, and a past officer. He was born at Savannah, Stark County, Ohio, in 1818, a son of James Grubs. At Palmyra, Michigan, he was married, January 1, 1868, to Sarah (Prentiss) Davis . She was born at Vermillion, Huron (Now Erie) County, Ohio, September 19, 1819, the daughter of James and Elizabeth (Brooks) Prentiss. Before enlistment Mr. Grubs was a farmer and resided near Clyde, Ohio .

James H. Hafford

Was commissioned second lieutenant of Company G, 10th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, by Governor Tod, at Columbus, Ohio, October, 6, 1862. The regiment was assigned to the 3d division, Army of the Cumberland, at that time under General Stanley and afterwards under General Kilpatrick. Mr. Hafford was promoted to first lieutenant January 15, 1863, and discharged August 1, 1863 on surgeon’s certificate of disability. He re-enlisted at Columbus, November 22, 1863, and was commissioned captain of Company M, 10th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. He rejoined his regiment at Rossville, Georgia . Captain Hafford engaged in the battles of Snow Hill, Tennessee, Resaca, Georgia, in the siege of Atlanta, and the raid under Kilpatrick in the rear of Atlanta, the battle of Lovejoy Station, where they fought the enemy dismounted for three hours, and Captain Hafford had his left hand paralyzed. After the battle of Jonesboro he started with Sherman on the March to the Sea. At the battle of Macon, Georgia, Captain Hafford, with one hundred men, made a charge on the rebel breastworks, behind which the enemy were two thousand strong, with thirteen pieces of artillery. His horse was killed and fell on him, almost crushing his leg, and injuring his spine so that he was never able for duty again, he was then taken prisoner and placed inside the stockade at Macon, where he remained until the 10th of April. He was then sent to Andersonville, thence by rail to Albany, and then a two days march toward Thomasville . He was returned to Anderson Ville, and at the end of a week word came that General Wilson was making a cavalry raid, and he was paroled. After several weeks spent in traveling by rail and on foot, from one point to another, he arrived at Annapolis, Maryland, and was sent in charge of five hundred and fifty prisoners to Columbus, Ohio . Returning to Annapolis, he was discharged as a paroled prisoner of war, June 16, 1865, at the end of a two year’s service. While in active service he was assigned to special duty at one time, being sent with a detachment of twenty men to Louisville, Kentucky, to gather fresh horses for his regiment. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. Mr. Hafford was born in Troy, New York, September 12, 1816, the son of Samuel and Esther ( Graves ) Hafford. He married, at Columbus, Ohio, November 9, 1874, Nannie D. Butts, born in Licking County, Ohio, August 2, 1835, the daughter of Samuel and Fannie (Blake) Butts. The first wife of Mr. Hafford was Florilla (Williams) Hafford. The children of this marriage were born: Albert H., November 2, 1839, deceased; William S., January 21, 1841, deceased; Helen Salina, October 24, 1842, resides at Trenton, Missouri ; Joseph William, January 19, 1848, resides at Columbus . Mr. Hafford was superintendent of buildings at the Ohio penitentiary for about twenty years, but was obliged, by failing health, to resign the office. He resides at present in Fremont, Ohio .

Andrew J. Hale

Entered Company E, 25th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, enlisting at Fremont, Ohio, May 20, 1861. He was elected second lieutenant, and was afterwards appointed quartermaster of his regiment, ranking as first lieutenant. Lieutenant Hale rendered very efficient service in every department of the various duties to which he was detailed. His business capacity was soon recognized and he was kept on special duty at the headquarters, or in the quartermaster’s department, during the two years and nine months of his military life. He resigned his commission in February, 1863, at Bells Landing, Virginia. Soon after his resignation Lieutenant Hale received the following memorial from the officers of his regiment:

“HEADQUARTERS 25TH REGIMENT, OVI
BROOKS STATION, VA., February 24, 1863
Lieutenant A. J. Hale:
SIR -- The undersigned, commissioned officers of the 25th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, have learned with regret that you have resigned your commission and are about to leave us. As our associations with you as an officer and gentlemen have been of the most pleasant kind, we desire to congratulate you upon the eminently able and satisfactory manner in which, as quartermaster of this regiment, you have always, and often under trying and difficult circumstances, conducted the business of your department, and, although ignorant of the causes which have induced you to sever your connection with this regiment, we sincerely hope it may result to your advantage, and that as a citizen your future may be as successful and prosperous as your career as an officer has been bright and honorable.
William P. Richardson, Col. 25th O.V.I.; Jere Williams, Major; L.G. Meyer, Surgeon; Z. Ragan, Chaplain; S.G. Andrews, Asst. Surgeon; Wm. Walton, Asst. Surgeon; N. Haughton, Capt. Co. A; Chas. B. Jones, Capt. Co. B; J. W. Bowlus, Capt. Co. C; M. H. Crowell, Capt. Co. E; J. F. Oliver, Capt. Co. F; C. E. Randall, Lieut. Commander Co. G; A. Higgins, Capt. Co. II; Wm. Askew, Capt. Co. I; Alex. Sinclair, Lieut. Commanding Co. K; J. W. Brown, Capt. Co K, detached; H.H. Mosely, 1st Lieut. Co. H; N. C. Manning, 1ST Lieut. Co C; N.G. Cornelius, 2d Lieut. Co. E; J. T. Wood, 1st Lieut. Co. E. J. H. Milliman, 2d Lieut. Co. G; L.E. Wilson, 2d Lieut. Co. K; E. C. Culp, 2d Lieut. Co. C; Geo. W. Martin, 1st Lieut. Co. B.; A. J. Phelps, Q. M. sergeant; D.R. Hunt, C. sergeant; Jordan and Asken, sutlers.”

He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. He was born in Steuben County, New York, May 25, 1828, and January 3, 1850 was united in marriage with Elizabeth Adaline Simkins, a native of Muskingum County, Ohio . At present Mr. Hale is station agent for the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad, at Fremont, Ohio, which position he has held (with the exception of the time spent in the service) since 1857.

George W. Hall

Entered the service of his country at Providence, Rhode Island . He enrolled as a private in Company I, 11th Rhode Island Volunteer Infantry. During the fifteen months of his military life he shared the duties of his regiment, joining in their marches and engaging with them in their encounter with the enemy. He participated in battles at Suffolk and at Petersburg, Virginia . He was discharged at Providence, July 13, 1863. In Eaton Post, No. 55, G.A.R., Mr. Hall holds the office of present chaplain. He was born at Providence, Jun 11, 1837. His parents are George W. and Lotildia (Aldrich) Hall. At Clyde, Ohio, June 17, 1867, he married Mary A. Rinehart, born at Pontiac, Michigan, the daughter of Henry and Amelia Rinehart. Their children were born in the following order: Emily A., William H., Edith M., George F., Frederick A., Sheldon W., Adelia M., and Grace E. They reside at Clyde, Ohio, the last six with their parents. Mr. Hall is engaged in business as a painter.

George A. Harrison

Left his home and family and enlisted February 26, 1864, as a private in Company D, 3d Ohio Veteran Volunteer Cavalry. The regiment was assigned to the 2d brigade, 2d division, Kilpatrick’s corps. At Columbia, Tennessee, Mr. Harrison was left in the rear and did not enter with his regiment into the battle at Atlanta . He was detailed on special duty as scout from May 22, until July 15, 1864, at Columbia, Tennessee, and was then stationed at Franklin, Tennessee, until the middle of October, when he rejoined his regiment at Nashville . At Franklin, where he was on garrison duty, he captured two prisoners. For fifteen years he has been unfitted for work, and for twelve years he has been bedridden. The government pays him for his services a pension of seventy-two dollars a month. He was discharged at Columbus, Ohio, having been in the army one year and six months. Charles Essett, a nephew of the subject of our sketch, was a soldier in the late war. He now resides in Fremont . Mr. Harrison was born in Brooklyn, New York, September 10, 1825, a son of George A. and Alvina Harrison. He married, in Sandusky County, Ohio, July 3, 1853, Mary Hutchins, born in Huron County, Ohio, May 22, 1830, the daughter of Rufus and Ann (Snow) Hutchins. Their children were born: Aurelia, August 4, 1854, died December 23, 1883; Fanny C., March 4, 1856; Charles, August 9, 1858, living now in Crawford County, Ohio; Anvilla, May 3, 1861, died in 1862; George, August 30, 1864; Frank, September 1, 1866; Nettie Belle, April 29, 1871. The post office address of Mr. Harrison is Fremont, Ohio .

Rutherford Birchard Hayes

Was enrolled as a private in the Burnet Rifles at Cincinnati immediately after the assault on Fort Sumter and was in April elected captain of the company. His services with a company were offered to Governor Dennison and he was commissioned major of the 23d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. During the West Virginia campaign in the summer and fall of 1861, he served under General Rosecrans, and was for a time judge-advocate on his staff. November 4, 1861, he was promoted lieutenant-colonel of his regiment, which he commanded from that time until he was severely wounded at South Mountain . In 1862 he was appointed colonel of the 79th Ohio, but his wound prevented his joining the regiment, and on 15th of October, same year, he was promoted colonel of the 23d. From December 25, 1862, until after Sheridan ’s victory of Winchester, September 19, 1864, he commanded the 1st brigade of the Kanawha division, and from that time through the remaining campaigning of the year he commanded the Kanawha division. In October, 1864, Colonel Hayes was appointed brigadier-general, the rank dating from the battle of Cedar Creek. At the close of the war he was engaged under General Hancock in preparations for a campaign against Lynchburg, by way of the mountains of West Virginia . General Hayes was brevetted major-general at the close of the war, for “gallant and distinguished services during the campaign of 1864 in West Virginia, particularly at the battles of Fishers Hill and Cedar Creek.” In the preceding pages, with the record of Ohio soldiers, his army life is further touched upon. He was four times wounded in the service and had four horses shot under him. His service extended through four years. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32. G.A.R. The further public services of General Hayes, for the State, and for the Nation whose chief executive he has been, will be found in other parts of this volume. Born at Delaware, Ohio, October 4, 1822, a son of Rutherford and Sophia (Birchard) Hayes, General Hayes married Lucy W., the daughter of James and Maria (Cook) Webb. Their marriage was solemnized at Cincinnati, Ohio, December 30, 1852, and their children have the following record: Birchard A., born November 4, 1853, resides now in Toledo; Webb C., born Mach 20, 1856, lives in Cleveland; Rutherford P., born June 24, 1858, lives in Fremont; Joseph, born in 1861, died in 1863; George Crook, born in 1864, died in 1866; Fanny, born September 2, 1867, and Scott R., born February 8, 1871, are attending school; Manning Force, born in 1873, died in 1874. General Hayes resides in Fremont, Ohio .

Charles Frederick Heider

Enlisted in Company I, 4th United States Cavalry, on September 10, 1861, at Cincinnati, Ohio . The regiment was assigned to the 2d brigade, 1st division, 1st cavalry corps. Mr. Heider engaged in the battles of Fort Henry, Fort Donelson, Tennessee, Perryville, Kentucky, Stone River, Shelbyville, Shiloh; siege of Corinth, Mississippi, Chickamauga, and the siege of Atlanta, Georgia . During the battle of Stone River, Tennessee, he was taken prisoner but was paroled on the field of battle. He was assigned to the band of the regiment in Tennessee . After three years of service he was discharged September 10, 1864, at Sandtown, Georgia . Mr. Heider was born at Benneckenstein, Prussia, son of Christian and Barbara (Reckes) Heider. He married at Fremont, December 27, 1865, Barbara A. Weiler, born in Baden, Germany, the daughter of Nicholas and Catherine (Engles) Weiler. Their children were born: Charles F., October 26, 1865; Amelia B., June 14, 1867; Lucy A., November 2, 1869; and Edward H., September 2, 1871. Since the death of Mr. Heider his wife has married Frank A. Baumann, who was born in Sandusky county. He is engaged in the grocery and restaurant business at Fremont, Ohio . A pension has been applied for by Mrs. Baumann which, though well deserved has not yet been received.

Charles W. Hess

Entered the service of his country at Clyde, Ohio, in May 1864. He enlisted as a private in Company A, 169th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 2d brigade, 2d division, 19th army corps. Mr. Hess was promoted to the rank of sergeant in Virginia . His regiment went to Tennallytown, near Washington, District of Columbia, and were stationed at Fort Lincoln, where they had the pleasure of having President Lincoln with them. While here the rebels shot at the president several times, once wounding a man who stood by his side. Mr. Hess was with his comrades when they made a charge on the enemy and demolished the house in which they were, driving them back into the woods. He was once detailed on picket duty, on Leesburg pike, and was not relieved for forty-eight hours. The regiment marched towards Washington, with other regiments, guarding prisoners and engaging in skirmishes. They then went to Spotsylvania C.H. where they had many encounters with the enemy during about two weeks. They took some prisoners and captured a large number of arms. Having led the life of a soldier for four months and ten days, Mr. Hess was honorably discharged at Cleveland, Ohio, in October, 1864. His brother-in-law was a member of Company F, 38th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and enlisted at Swanton, Ohio . He died March 19, 1880, of consumption contracted in the army. Charles W. Hess was born at Monroeville, Ohio, March 11, 1844, a son of R. W. and Mary Ann (Patrick) Hess. He married at Clyde, Ohio, November 7, 1867, Mary Isabel Esterly, born at Bellevue, Ohio, October 9, 1849, the daughter of M. J. and Mary Ann (Alward) Esterly. Their children were born: Fred, October 21, 1868; Angie, October 17, 1869, died August 24, 1881; Minnie, August 20, 1871; Albert, August 13, 1873; and Bessie, January 17, 1875, died April 15, 1876. Mr. Hess is a carpenter and lives at Clyde, Ohio .

Jacob Hess

Entered the Union army in October, 1864, enlisting at Fremont, Ohio . He enrolled as a private in Company A, 33d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 1st division, 14th army corps. Mr. Hess engaged with his regiment in the encounters with the enemy at and near Bentonsville, North Carolina, March 19, 1865. He was in the service of his country during nine months and was honorably discharged at Columbus, Ohio, June 3, 1865. He is a member of Lewis Baker Post, No. 172, G.A.R. Mr. Hess was born in Washington Township, Sandusky County, Ohio, February 3, 1844. His parents are John L. and Mary Ann (Gahn) Hess. In his native township, December 10, 1865, he was united in marriage to Amanda Overmyer. Mrs. Hess was born in Washington Township, the daughter of Jacob and Catherine ( Anderson ) Overmyer. The children of Jacob and Amanda Hess have the following record: Mary C., born in 1866, died in 1873; Ida J., born in 1867, died in 1873. The living children were born: Cora A., April 7, 1870; George H., December 2, 1872; Sarah L., June 19, 1874; Rutherford B., August 26, 1876; Jacob S., June 20, 1880; Alvin E., March 13, 1882; Elmer Gillespie, June 14, 1884. Mr. Hess is engaged in the management and cultivation of his farm near Lindsey, Ohio .

George J. Hill

August 2, 1862, enlisted in the service of his country in Townsend township, Sandusky county. He entered Company K, 100th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as a private. His regiment was assigned to the 3d brigade, 3d division, 23d army corps. Mr. Hill was present with his regiment, and actively engaged in the battles at Knoxville, Resaca, Peach Tree Creek, Columbia, Franklin, Tennessee, Nashville, Tennessee, and Kinston, North Carolina . He was assigned to special duty as nurse at the small pox hospital and also as general nurse in the hospital. He was a soldier during three years and was discharged at Greensboro, North Carolina, June 7, 1865, and mustered out of service at Cleveland, Ohio, July 1, 1865. He was born in Ballville Township, Sandusky County, December 3, 1843, a son of Joseph and Fanny Maria (Chatfield) Hill. At Fremont, Ohio, October 25, 1878, he married Louisa K. Kaiser, born in Riley Township, this county, January 25, 1847, the daughter of John and Annie (Karble) Kaiser. They have three children, born: Lewis Irvine, August 19, 1879; Ralph Burton, June 29, 1881; and Mary Maria, June 9, 1883. The children of Mrs. Hill by her first husband were born: Frank Austin, February 10, 1865; Annie Austin, January 31, 1867; George Albert Austin, February 5, 1870; Della D. Austin, May 6, 1875; Ella N. Austin, May 6, 1875; and Alma L. Austin, June 10, 1877. The first wife of Mr. Hill was Hester Lavinia (Andrus) Hill. The children by this marriage were born: Minville M, May 17, 1866; Frank Davis, October 30, 1870; Emmet George, February 12, 1874; Andrus J., September 6, 1876, died August 9, 1877. Mr. Hill is a farmer and a fisherman. His post office address is Whitmore, Sandusky County, Ohio .

W. H. Hineline

Enlisted August 2, 1862, as a private in Company A, 100th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 3d brigade, 3d division, 23d army corps. At the battle of Limestone, Tennessee, Company A suffered great loss, and Mr. Hineline was taken prisoner. He was confined in Libby prison for three weeks, and endured great hardships. The prison was so full that the men could scarcely find room in which to lie down. At the end of this time he was removed to Belle Isle, and remained during six months. Here he was taken sick and almost died. He was paroled and exchanged, then rejoined his regiment. He then entered upon the Atlanta campaign and shared in the hardships of the march from Chattanooga to Atlanta . He never missed a roll call except when he was in prison. After a life in the field of three years he was discharged at Greensboro, North Carolina, July 1865. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. He was born in Pennsylvania, October 3, 1835, a son of Hugh B. and Rebecca (Lattig) Hineline, the former now deceased. Mr. Hineline is prosperously engaged in the cultivation of his farm near Fremont, Ohio .

Martin Hite

Enlisted at Fremont, Ohio, October 26, 1861, entering Company F, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as a drummer. He was promoted to sergeant. The regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 1st division, 15th army corps. At Germantown, Tennessee, January 2, 1864, Mr. Hite re-enlisted, entering the same company. He engaged in the battles of Lick Creek, Shiloh, two engagements at Corinth, Mississippi, Grand Gulf, Port Gibson, two battles at Jackson, Brandon, siege of Vicksburg, Yazoo River, Fort Blakely, Spanish Fort, and many other small engagements and skirmishes. He was slightly wounded, but not sufficiently to send him from the field. The regiment started from Devalls Bluff, Arkansas, and marched a distance of seventeen hundred miles, to Fort Scott, Kansas, this being one continuous march. Mr. Hite was in the service of his country during four years, less a few weeks, and was discharged at Columbus, Ohio, September 20, 1865. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. He was born in Sandusky County, Ohio, August 24, 1841, a son of John and Phoebe ( Hudson ) Hite. In his native county, March 16, 1864, he married Eliza Smith, born in Germany, March 7, 1846, the daughter of John Peter and Martha (Ritz) Smith. They have five children, who were born: Charles Wesley, August 26, 1866; Nellie A, January 24, 1868; Martha E, February 3, 1870; Oliver K., September 15, 1878; and Eva C., June 23, 1881. Mr. Hite is engaged in business as a clerk and carpenter. He resides at Ballville, with post office address at Fremont, Ohio.

Louis Householder

Entered the army at Perrysburg, Ohio, May 2, 1864. He enlisted as a private, and was promoted to lieutenant for meritorious services. He was on duty at Annapolis Junction, and was at one time detailed to take care of a sick comrade. During four months he served his country, and was discharged at Sand Hill, Georgia . While in the service, Mr. Householder was very sick with typhoid fever and he never entirely recovered his health. He died October 30, 1881, leaving a wife and a family of seven children. He was a member of Pemberville Post, G.A.R. In Jefferson County, Ohio, he was born November 7, 1835. His parents are John and Rebecca (Lowrey) Householder. He married April 18, 1862, in Wood county, Ohio, Samantha C. McCreary. Mrs. Householder was born in Morrow county, Ohio, October 5, 1839, the daughter of George and Mary (Hayden) McCreary. Their children were born: Robert A., March 28, 1863, now lives in Wood County; Florence M., January 1, 1865; John Hamilton, November 28, 1866; Georgie A., March 7, 1871; Maley B., February 7, 1873; Walter, February 19, 1876; and Ray, February 16, 1880, died March 30, 1883. Mr. Householder, before his enlistment, was a farmer, and resided near Pemberville, Ohio .

William Howard

Enlisted at Detroit, Michigan, June 6, 1862, as a private in the 4th Michigan Cavalry. The regiment was assigned to the 2d brigade, 1st division, 3d army corps. Mr. Howard was transferred to the 154th Veteran Reserve Corps. He engaged with his regiment in the battles of Chickamauga, Stone River, and had many other encounters with the enemy. At his first engagement he was stunned by a shell and thought that his fighting days were numbered, but, on recovering consciousness, found that he was still to endure much hard service. He was assigned to special duty on several occasions, such as dispatch and special guard duty. During three years he was in active service, and was discharged at Nashville, Tennessee, July 5, 1865. Mr. Howard is an honorary member of C. B. Gambee Post, No. 33, G.A.R. He was born at Detroit, Michigan, September 28, 1840. His parents are Ira B. and Eunice (Turner) Howard. At Bellevue, Ohio, he married Carrie Metcalf. Mrs. Howard was born in England, August 10, 1838, a daughter of James and Jane Metcalf. They have two children, Ira, born September 12, 1871, and Hally, born August 19, 1873. Mr. Howard is an elevator manager, and resides at Bellevue, Sandusky county, Ohio .

Henry Hunsinger

Enlisted at Fremont, Ohio, November 29, 1861, entering Company B, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as a drummer. He was discharged from this service on July 25, 1863, at Camp Dennison, Ohio . January 12, 1865, he re-enlisted at Fremont, enrolling in Company E, 186th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as a musician. He was detailed on non-commissioned staff, and was the principal musician of his regiment. Mr. Hunsinger took part in the battles of Shiloh, Tennessee, siege of Corinth, Mississippi, Cumberland Gap, Strawberry Plains, Wild Cat Mountain, Tennessee, Dalton, Georgia, Nashville, Tennessee, and several engagements of less note. During one month he was in the hospital with an attack of typhoid fever, after which he went home on a sick furlough of forty days. Mr. Hunsinger served in the commissary department, dealing out rations to the soldiers, while the regiment was in Kentucky and Tennessee . They were hemmed in by the enemy at Knoxville, Tennessee, during almost the entire winter of 1863. During two years and eight months he served his country faithfully, and was discharged at Nashville, Tennessee, September 18, 1865. In Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R., he holds the office of quartermaster sergeant. Joseph Hunsinger, father of the subject of our sketch, was a member of Company F, 49th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was wounded in the service and died at his home in Fremont of apoplexy, aged fifty-five years. Henry Hunsinger was born at Fremont, Ohio, May 30, 1845, a son of Joseph and Mary T. (Ant) Hunsinger. He married at Fremont, February 26, 1867, Julia Ann Heim, born at Hessia, Germany, August 14, 1847, the daughter of Frank Joseph Heim. Their children are: Frank John, Dora Josephine, Clara Ann, and Ralph Arnold. Mr. Hunsinger is engaged in business as a druggist, at Fremont, Ohio .

Joseph Hunsinger

Enlisted April 24, 1861, at Fremont, Ohio, in the three months service. He entered Company F, 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Discharged at Germantown, Tennessee, January 25, 1864, he re-enlisted on the same day, into the same company, and was promoted to the rank of corporal. Mr. Hunsinger was actively engaged with his regiment in the battles of Shiloh, Tennessee, siege of Corinth, Mississippi, siege of Vicksburg, Jackson, Mississippi, Nashville, Tennessee, Spanish Fort, and Mobile, Alabama . During his term of service of four years and five months he was a participant in about forty skirmishes, sharing with his regiment in all of their marches and encounters with the enemy, except the time between November 7, 1864, and March 9, 1865, when he was in the hospital. Mr. Hunsinger was assigned to special duty at division headquarters near Meridian, Mississippi, as post baker, and continued in this service for three months. He was discharged September 20, 1865, at Vicksburg, Mississippi . He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. Joseph Hunsinger, the father of the subject of our sketch, entered Company F, 49th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He served little more than a year, and died at his home in Fremont, November 9, 1871, of apoplexy. He was also afflicted with asthma, contracted in the army. Joseph Hunsinger was born in Sandusky County, March 25, 1839, a son of Joseph and Mary Theresa (Ant) Hunsinger. He married at Clyde, Ohio, March 17, 1864, Christina Clara Slaughter, born in Sandusky County, September 9, 1844, the daughter of George and Mary (Smith) Slaughter. Their children were born: Henry Joseph, August 20, 1865, deceased; Laura Theresa, July 5, 1867; John Franklin, October 12, 1869; George Christian, December 9, 1871; Willie Clarence, April 21, 1873; Bertha May, April 22, 1875; Olive Blanch, February 13, 1877; Charles Earl, June 1, 1880; Leona, September 12, 1883. Mr. Hunsinger is engaged in business as a baker and turner.

Jacob Hutchinson

Enlisted at Freeport, Ohio, November 19, 1861, as a private in Company C, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 2d brigade, 2d division, 15th army corps. Mr. Hutchinson participated in the battles of Pittsburg Landing, siege of Corinth, Tupelo, Tishomingo Creek, Brandon and Guntown, Mississippi . At the battle of Pittsburg Landing, he was twice grazed by a ball, both times having the flesh of his arm and shoulder blistered. June 11, 1864, at Guntown, Mississippi, Mr. Hutchinson was taken prisoner, and he was held at Andersonville, Savannah and several other places for eleven months. At the close of the war he was released and left to get home in the best way he could. His prison life was one of hardships and suffering. While awaiting transportation at Meridian, with a lot of other prisoners, one of the guard shot one of the men. The ball, passing through his breast, struck Mr. Hutchinson in the breast, but being spent did no injury. While the rebels were marching to keep their prisoners from General Sherman, they were obliged to march sixty miles through water from ankle deep to their arm pits. Ice was in the water, as it was just before Christmas. Mr. Hutchinson became almost chilled to death. He was assigned to special duty in the commissary department at Camp Chase, Ohio, for some time. He served his country faithfully for three years and seven months and was discharged at Columbus, Ohio, May 31, 1865. In Hamilton Post, No. 90, G.A.R., he is past commander. He was born in Medina county, Ohio, April 23, 1836, a son of J.W. and Mary (Fritz) Hutchinson . He married in Sandusky county, Ohio, November 8, 1866, Emeline Keller, born in the same county, September 3, 1847, the daughter of Andrew and Rowena (Plantz) Keller. Their children were born: Albert S., August 8, 1867; Herbert R., September 14, 1869, died September 11, 1876; Amos V., August 28, 1871, died September 24, 1876; Mary E. J., September 22, 1873, died September 8, 1876; Linna Rowena, March 23, 1879, and Minna Rowena, on the same day; Ralph B., April 10, 1881. Mr. Hutchinson is a farmer and resides near Rollersville, Ohio .

Daniel Ickes

Enlisted in the service of his country at Fremont, Ohio, in August, 1862. He entered Company G, 111th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as a private. The regiment was assigned to the 2d brigade, 2d division, 15th army corps. In November, 1862, he died at Bowling Green, Kentucky, of chronic diarrhea. His brother, John J. Ickes, went to Bowling Green to take care of him and on his death brought the remains to Helena and buried him beside his father and mother at Gibsonburg, Ohio . John J. Ickes was born in Sandusky County, Ohio, November 20, 1838. His father, John Ickes, came from Pennsylvania to Seneca County, Ohio, in 1829, and two years later came to Sandusky County, near where Helena now stands, but which was then a howling wilderness. He died February 3, 1881, aged seventy-seven years. Mary (Garn) Ickes, mother of John J., died January 10, 1870. On December 24, 1863, in Sandusky County, he married Zadie A. Huston. Mrs. Ickes was born in Knox County, Ohio, June 9, 1843, the daughter of Alexander and Nancy (Phelps) Huston, the former now deceased. They have a family consisting of six children: Effie M., born May 28, 1865; L.Z., April 1, 1868; Martin A., April 27, 1870; Elmer C., March 27, 1876; Eldon L., February 1, 1882; Zora M., May 23, 1884. Mr. Ickes owns a beautiful farm of two hundred acres near Helena, Ohio . He has about one-half of it under cultivation.

Henry Innes

Answered the first call “to arms” and enlisted at Easton, Pennsylvania, April 16, 1861. He entered Company D, 1st Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, as a private. February 28, 1864, he re-enlisted at Fremont, Ohio, as a member of Company E, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. A few months after his second enlistment Mr. Innes engaged in the Guntown, Mississippi, Expedition. He was taken prisoner June 12, 1864, and was held at Andersonville, Salisbury, Macon and Charleston, enduring all of the hardships of those infamous prison pens for many months. He was discharged at Camp Chase, Ohio, in July 1865, having been in the service of his country about two years. He was born at Easton, Pennsylvania, August 10, 1838. His parents are Samuel and Matilda (Innes) Innes. At Green Springs, Ohio, he married Lydia Ann Frank. Mrs. Innes was born in New York state, September 24, 1840, the daughter of Henry and Phoebe (Dawley) Frank. Their children were born: Frank, August 22, 1866; Mary, December 30, 1869; Tillie, May 2, 1873; William, April 27, 1879, and Phoebe, February 6, 1884. Mr. Innes is a laborer. He resides at Green Springs, Seneca County, Ohio .

Christian Jacobs

Entered Company F, of the 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry at Fremont, Ohio, June 7, 1861. He enlisted as a private, and the regiment was assigned to the 2d army corps. He was promoted to corporal at Elk River, Virginia, in August,1863, for meritorious service in the field. Mr. Jacobs engaged with his regiment in the battles of Romney, Blue Gap, Front Royal, Winchester (Virginia), Port Republic (Virginia), Antietam (Maryland), Fredericksburg, Peninsula, Harrisons Landing, Gettysburg (Pennsylvania), and the battle of Wilderness, Virginia. During this last encounter with the enemy, May 10, 1864, Mr. Jacobs was wounded by a musket ball in the right leg below the knee. He walked some distance alone and was then assisted into the ambulance and taken to the field hospital. He was transferred to the hospital in Washington, District of Columbia, and remained there until June 28, 1864, when he rejoined his regiment and was mustered out of service with them at Cleveland, Ohio, July 13, 1864. Mr. Jacobs served as a soldier three years and one month. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. Henry Grabach was a member of Company F, 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was wounded at the battle of Wilderness, and entered the Grover Hospital at Washington, District of Columbia . He died of his wounds, having lost a leg and an arm, in June, 864. His mother receives a pension. Christian Jacobs was born in Ihringen Baden, Germany, June 2, 1838. He is a son of George and Maria (Jacobs) Jacobs. On the 13th of January,1865, he married at Fremont, Ohio, Lany Grund, who was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, December 4, 1844, a daughter of Heinrich and Christiana (Diam) Grund. They have an only daughter, Emma Katie, born December 17, 1871. Mr. Jacobs is a cabinet maker, and resides at Fremont.


John E. Jones

Entered the service in October, 861, as a private in Company G, 81st Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He enrolled in Morrow county, Ohio, when the regiment was organized. In the battles of Corinth, Pittsburg Landing, Altoona, Atlanta and a number of skirmishes, Mr. Jones took an active part. At Corinth a spent ball struck him in the thigh, cutting the skin, and another ball cut through his clothes. He narrowly escaped capture at Shiloh . In July, 1864, at a battle at Atlanta, Georgia, he was wounded by a minie-ball, which struck him in the throat and just grazed his windpipe. He was carried from the field to the hospital and his wound was dressed, then he was sent to Marietta, Georgia, and remained in the hospital there for a month. During the three years and two months of his service he was frequently detailed on special duty, being sent out on foraging and scouting expeditions. Although often employed on dangerous duty he was always fortunate enough to escape capture. He suffered much from fever and ague, but he would never leave his company to enter the hospital. At Columbus, Ohio, January 1, 1865, he was discharged. Mr. Jones was born in Montgomeryshire, North Wales, December 24, 1836. His parents are John and Mary Jones. He married in Sandusky County, Ohio, December 23, 1866, Cynthia Ladd, born in Columbiana County, Ohio, January 21, 1841, the daughter of Cornelius and Thursa (Myers) Ladd. They have five children, born: Josephine, October 5, 1868; Thomas, July 1, 1871; Mary M., October 25, 1873; John W., September 23, 1875; and Sarah B., April 23, 1879. Mr. Jones is at present employed n the cultivation of his farm. His post office address is Pemberville, Ohio.

Albert May June

April 18, 1861, entered the army, enlisting at Norwalk, Huron County, Ohio . He was mustered into service at Fremont, Ohio, as a private in Company G. 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment went to Cleveland, Ohio, and remained ten days and then went to Camp Denison . Mr. June was with his regiment here until the 14th of June, 1861, when he was granted leave of absence and went home. In two months he was mustered out of service at Fremont . On July 13, 1863, he enlisted ay New York and was mustered into service in the United States navy. He was assigned to the United States steamer Gertrude, and on the 22nd of July the vessel left New York for New Orleans . August16, they captured the blockade runner Black Warrior, near Mobile, Alabama . The enemy’s vessel was disabled by three shots from the Gertrude and the crew surrendered. From New Orleans Mr. June went with his comrades to Mobile, and engaged in the blockade opposite that place for six months. They captured three sail vessels, all blockade runners, the Allen, the Alert and the Winona . During the battle and capture of Mobile, the Gertrude was employed as a dispatch boat. After the rebel forts were silenced they sailed for New Orleans and were under repairs for two months. They were then sent to Galveston, Texas, and remained from the 10th of August until about the 20th of October, 1864. Having served one year and eight months, which was four months after he term of enlistment had expired, Mr. June was sent to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and mustered out of service, November 5, 1864. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. He was born in Sandusky county, Ohio, March 29, 1841, a son of Daniel L. and Avis Rebecca (Ellsworth) June. He married at Wakeman, Huron County, Ohio, November 1, 1868, Abbie Alice Griffin, born in Erie County, Ohio, August 29, 1849, the daughter of Horace and Fanny (Cables) Griffin . Mrs. Abbie A. June died September 30, 1880. Their children were born: Albert Daniel, August 12, 1869, and George, September 9, 1871. September 25, 1884, Mr. June was united in wedlock with Lizzie Umbaugh. He is a machinist and engineer at Fremont, Ohio .

Joseph Kihn

Enlisted at Fremont, Ohio, June 7, 1861, entering Company F, 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as a private. The regiment was assigned to the 2d brigade, 3d division, 3d army corps. Mr. Kihn went with his comrades to Comp Dennison, Ohio, and crossed the Ohio river at Bellaire. They went to Grafton, West Virginia, and were engaged in the raid after the rebel General Hill’s forces. They also guarded the Baltimore & Ohio railroad. At Wilmington, West Virginia, they had a sharp but short encounter with the enemy, who had entrenched themselves on a hill. One man in their regiment was killed. Their next engagement was at Romney, October 26, 1861. The battle began at two o’clock and at six o’clock in the evening they entered the place. Leaving Romney on the sixth of January, they marched to Bloomery Gap. Here General Lander fell dad from his horse, of heart disease, and General Shields took command of the forces. They advanced on the place and took possession without the loss of a man. Marching to Winchester, they engaged in battle and drove Stonewall Jackson’s forces to Strasburg, and then marched via Bull Run and Manassas junction to Alexandria, and shipped to the Peninsula to re-enforce General McClellan. Here they took part in the seven days battle. They then crossed the Pamunkey river and their next engagement was at Antietam, September 17, 1862. Here Company F lost thirty-two men. Mr. Kihn was then transferred to the 6th United States Cavalry, October 23, 1862. He went to Washington, District of Columbia, and was there six weeks breaking horses for the volunteer cavalry, after which he joined his command, and with them took part in the battle of Gettysburg . While making a charge, Mr. Kihn’s horse was shot under him and he was taken prisoner. He took the lock from his carbine to prevent its being used by the enemy. While being transferred to Libby prison he was very nearly starved to death, and here and at Belle Isle he endured untold hardships. On December 31, 1863, he was released and sent to Annapolis, Maryland, where he entered the hospital for a short time and then rejoined his regiment at White House Landing. His time having expired, he was discharged and arrived home June 14, 1864. On February 6, 1865, he re-enlisted in Company E, 186th Ohio Volunteer infantry, and went with his regiment to Nashville, Tennessee, marched thence to Murfreesboro, and was transported by rail to Chattanooga, Tennessee . Here Mr. Kihn was commissioned third sergeant of his company. He went to Cleveland, Tennessee, Dalton, Georgia, returned to Chattanooga and Nashville, and at the end of six weeks was ordered to Camp Chase, Columbus, Ohio . He was discharged, having served four years, September 25, 1865. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. George Kihn, brother of Joseph, was a soldier in the French army and was killed at the siege of Sebastopol, December 14, 1854. Mr. Kihn was born in France, December 14, 1837, a son of Joseph and Christina (Hoot) Kihn. He married at Fremont, Ohio, August 16, 1864, Mary Wendling, born in France in 1839, the daughter of Antony and Theresa Wendling. Their children were born: Joseph, June 7, 1865; Barbara Clara, February 22, 1867; John, October 23, 1869; Theresa, July 14, 1871; George, Juy 21, 1875; Michael, January 8, 1879; Louisa Dore and Max William, July 21, 1881, died September 1 and 18, 1881, respectively. Mr. Kihn resides at Fremont, and is a railroad section hand.

Charles Klegin

Was among the first to enroll his name as a soldier in the Union army. He enlisted as a private in Company F, 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, at Fremont, Ohio, April 17, 1861. At Camp Taylor, Cleveland, Ohio, on the 28th of the same month, he was promoted corporal. June 5, 1861, he re-enlistd into the same company of the 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as corporal. In Virginia, August 1863, Mr. Klegin was made sergeant for meritorious conduct in the field. He engaged with his regiment in the battles of Romney, Winchester, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Mine Run, Wilderness, Spotsylvania C.H. and many engagements and skirmishes of less note. At the battle of Chancellorsville, Mr. Klegin was wounded by the fragment of a shell. His left hand was terribly lacerated, and he was sent to the hospital at Washington, District of Columbia, rejoining his regiment July 13, 1863. In May, 1864, at the battle of Spotsylvania, he was under fire from three o’clock in the morning until about eight o’clock, when a minie-ball struck him in the thigh, making a severe wound. He was first sent to the hosital at Fredericksburg, Virginia, and was under treatment at various hospitals until July 8, 1864, when he was ordered to Cleveland, Ohio, to be mustered out of service, with the rest of his regiment, at the end of three years and three months of military life. He draws a pension of four dollars a month. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No 32 G.A.R. Jacob Moler, a brother-in-law, was a member of the 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He served about four years, and died in May, 1865, of disease contracted in the army. Charles Klegin was born in Prussia, Germany, April 9, 1834, a son of Michael Klegin. He married Barbara Moler, at Fremont, Ohio, May 7, 1867. Mrs. Klegin was born in Switzerland, April 13, 1842, the daughter of Sebastian Moler. Their two sons were born: Frank W., May 24, 1868, died October 2, 1881; and Frederick C., May 1, 1871. Mr. Klegin is a tailor at Fremont, Ohio.

Andrew Kline

In November, 1861, enlisted at Fremont, Ohio, as a private in Company H, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was promoted to 2d lieutenant November 22, and April 6, 1862, received the rank of 1st lieutenant. He was wounded in the shoulder at the battle of Shiloh, by a minie-ball, and was compelled to retire and join the reserve at Crumps Landing in the rear of the main army. He was removed to the hospital at Keokuk, Iowa . His brother, Rev. Adam Kline, took care of him, but not being satisfied with his attention had him removed to St. Louis, Missouri, and placed in the private house of Rev. Philip Kuil. After three weeks treatment he had sufficiently recovered to be removed to the home of his brother at Cincinnati, Ohio . Here he received careful treatment for three weeks, and was then able to return to his home in Sandusky County, Ohio . Mr. Kline’s wound healed on th outside but caused paralysis of the left side, from which he has not yet fully recovered. He was discharged at Washington, District of Columbia, September 10, 1862. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. Mr. Kline enlisted in the United States regular army June 5, 1846, and served in the Mexican war for fourteen months, participating in the battle of Monterey . As a private in Company F, 1st Regiment, he did much heavy marching, and suffered severely for want of water. He was discharged at New Orleans, Louisiana . Andrew Kline was born in Baden, Germany, June 18, 1824, in the village of Sanfeld . He is the son of Christian and Christina (Aldred) Kline, both now deceased. He married in Sandusky County, Ohio, October 22, 1848, Sarah A. Kreilick, born in Pennsylvania, January 28, 1832, the daughter of Adam and Elizabeth (Ritz) Kreilick, the latter deceased. Their children were born: Christina E, August 9, 1849; Lucy, August 27, 1853, now residing in Michigan; Susanna, May 22, 1856; Adam, March 4, 1858, residing in Michigan; John C., February 8, 1860; Sarah E. February 18, 1862; Mecity C., February 3, 1866; Mary M., February 18, 1868; and Andrew W., January 27, 1870. Mr. Kline is a farmer. His post office address is Fremont, Ohio .

Jacob Klusman

Left his home, his wife and babe, and entered the service of his country. In her defense he laid down his life. He enrolled as a private in Company B, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry, in Washington township, Sandusky county, Ohio, October 22, 1861. The regiment was assigned to the 2d brigade, 2d division, 15th army corps. Mr. Klusman participated in the battles of Shiloh, or Pittsburg Landing, and the siege of Corinth, Mississippi . After this engagement he was taken sick with a fever and removed to the hospital at Quincy, Illinois . Here he contracted the small-pox and died July 19, 1862. During nine months he was a soldier in the army of the Union . A pension is paid by the government to his widow, and one was paid to his daughter until she was sixteen years old. He was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, a son of Henry and Esther (Snyder) Klusman. He married in Washington township, August 30, 1860, Barbara Spohn. Mrs. Klusman was born in Washington township, a daughter of David and Catherine H. Spohn. Their only daughter was born August 22, 1861, and named Margaret C. Mr. Klusman was a carpenter before his enlistment.

Emanuel Kornbaum

Enlisted in July, 1861, at Jacksonville, Illinois, a private in Company A, 27th Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He took an active part in the battles of Belmont, Fort Henry, Fort Donelson, Island No. Ten, Corinth, Union City, La Vergne, Stone River, Chickamauga, and Missionary Ridge . Following the enemy from Nashville to Stone River the regimen were out of rations and entered the battle early in the morning not having had anything to eat. During this engagement Mr. Kornbaum was wounded in the right leg below the knee. The ball struck the bone and the wound was very painful, but the command was short of men and he would not leave the field. The surgeon extracted the ball and dressed the wound, and Mr. Kornbaum did not enter the hospital. He was at one time detailed on General Morton’s staff of topographical engineers. He assisted in laying out Fort Rosecrans and the fortifications at Murfreesboro and Chattanooga . At Island No. Ten, he was on the gunboat that ran the blockade in order to help General Pope’s command across the river. The night was dark and stormy, and they had almost gone safely through when the enemy fired on them. One shot made a hole in the smoke stack. The Union gunboat then fired three guns to let their friends know that they were safe, and a cheer from forty thousand men filled the air. During the engagement at Belmont Mr. Kornbaum captured three horses, one of them belonged to General Pillow, and putting wounded men on them he took them to the rear. On his way, seeing Lieutenant Shipley, who had entered the battle sick, he asked him to join him, but the lieutenant refused. When they returned with a flag of truce to bury their dead, they found him almost dead, with no clothing but his underclothing. He had been shot five times, and soon died. Three years and two months Mr. Kornbaum served as a soldier in the army, and was discharged, September 22, 1864, at Springfield, Illinois . He is officer of the day in Canfield Post, No. 124, G.A.R. He was born in Germany, May 29, 1841, a son of Edward and Elizabeth (Kaler) Kornbaum. His mother is a sister of the celebrated artist. He married in Sandusky county, Ohio, April 24, 1873, Elizabeth Townsend, born in Ohio, August 6, 1844, the daughter of Luther and Ollie (Roberts) Townsend. They have one daughter, Edith L. born October 3, 1875. Mr. Kornbaum is a blacksmith, and resides at Gibsonburg, Ohio.

Charles Kramb

Enlisted in Erie County, Ohio, October 27, 1861, as a private in Company G, 72 Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was promoted to corporal for meritorious services. At the battle of Shiloh, the men on both sides of Mr. Kramb were killed. At the siege of Corinth his regiment was the first to enter the city, as they were in advance as skirmishers. The next engagement of the regiment was at Jackson, then Vicksburg, and Guntown. They had a second battle at Jackson, and an encounter with the enemy at Brandon . On June 12, 1864, near Salisbury, Mr. Kramb was taken prisoner. After going from one place to another, he arrived at Andersonville . The first shelter he had from the weather was on the 18th of August. A comrade sold his watch for some meal sacks and they made tents of them. On the 8th of September, they left Andersonville and went to Savannah for a few days, and were then removed to Charleston, South Carolina . Here they received their first message from their friends. It came in the shape of a shell which, although dangerous, was welcome. They were transferred to Florence, South Carolina, where they received no rations for a few days, and then only a gill of meal. Mr. Kramb sold his watch, and he and his comrades had a feast. After their exchange and return home these comrades did not forget that their lives had been saved by that good meal. Some time before Christmas the four comrades from Company G, began putting aside a part of their rations, and on Christmas they had a good dinner. They left Florence February 16, and arrived at Wilmington on the 17th. Here the citizens gave the men what they could in the way of clothing and rations. Mr. Kramb’s uniform consisted of a blouse with no sleeves and a pair of pants reaching to the knees. While at Andersonville he once crossed the dead line, and his life was saved by a comrade who pulled him back. During his life in the prison here he also saw the raiders hung and one of them killed. At Wilmington, North Carolina, there was a chance of escape, and one of his comrades succeeded in getting away, but another comrade who was too weak to walk begged not to be left alone and Mr. Kramb remained with him. He was exchanged at Goldsboro, North Carolina, February 27, 1865, and was immediately taken sick. At the end of a month, although far from well, he went to Annapolis, where he received clothing and money, and was sent to Columbus, Ohio . Here he was discharged April 7, 1865. During three years, five months and ten days he was a faithful soldier. In Lewis Baker Post, No. 172, G.A.R., he is past senior vice commander. Mr. Kramb was born in Germany July 18, 1840, a son of John H. and Anna C. (Schmidt) Kramb. He married at Toledo, Ohio, December 24, 1868, Caroline L. Rampes, born at Milan, Huron County, Ohio, June 24, 1844, a daughter of John and Saloma (Schneider) Rampes. They have four children who were born: Mary C., January 29, 1872; Edna S., June 13, 1876; John H., December 3, 1878; Frederick C., April 6, 1881. Mr. Kramb is a farmer and resides near Lindsey, Ohio .

Henry J. Kramb

Was a native of Germany and enlisted in the defense of his adopted country in Sandusky county, Ohio . He enrolled as a private in Company A, 29th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He went from his home after his enlistment, in September, 1864, to Johnsons Island, thence to Columbus, Ohio, for several days, and then took a boat from Cincinnati to Louisville, Kentucky . He was then sent to Nashville, Tennessee, and at the end of a week to Chattanooga . Here he first experienced the discomforts of a soldier’s life. He lay out in the rain all night, and in the morning there was no fire and nothing to eat until noon. Here he received his arms and went on the top of a freight car to Atlanta, Georgia . Arrived at Atlanta he joined his regiment and went with Sherman on the March to the Sea, being promised a Christmas dinner at Savannah . They left that place December 21, 1864, and went to Fort Jackson . They returned to Savannah and remained until May, when they were ordered to Alexandria by way of the Atlantic Ocean . At the end of three weeks they went to Washington, and Mr. Kramb was sent to the hospital at Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania . From here he was discharged August 11, 1865, having served eleven months. In Lewis Baker Post, No. 172, G.A.R., he holds the office of past commander. He was born in Germany, August 16, 1838, a son of John Henry and Anna Catherine (Schmidt) Kramb. He married at Fremont, Ohio, April 22, 1866, Elizabeth Shively, born in Sandusky county, Ohio, September 10, 1837, the daughter of Joseph and Susan (Overmyer) Shively . Their children were born: Charles F., February 27, 1867; Ida A, July 28, 1869; Anna C., February 7, 1871; Alvesta A., August 7, 1872; Emma C., February 3, 1875; Hettie M., September 23, 1876; Ella E, October 12, 1878. Mr. Kramb is engaged in business as a hardware merchant. He resides in Lindsey, Ohio.

Anthony Lafor

Entered the army to serve his country in her hour of need. He enlisted at Sandusky City, Ohio, July 23, 1863, as a private in Company M, 1st Ohio regiment of heavy artillery. The regiment was assigned to the 4th army corps. Mr. Lafor was engaged with his regiment in active service during two years and one month, and was discharged in August, 1865, at Camp Dennison, Ohio . He was born in Townsend Township, Sandusky County, Ohio, a son of Richard and Julia (Deshetler) Lafor. At Port Clinton, Ohio, in August, 1878, he married Juluania Johnson. Mrs. Lafor was born in Townsend Township, a daughter of Washburn and Fannie Marie (Hotchkiss) Johnson. They have five children: George W., Clara E., Alice A., Anna Maria, Nellie May, and James Burton. The first wife of Mr. Lafor was Minnie ( Rhine ) Lafor. Mr. Lafor at present follows the peaceful occupation of farming. His post office address is Vickery, Sandusky County.

Paul Frederick Leibolt

Though he was not born in this country, enlisted in its defense at Mansfield, Ohio, October 1, 1862. He entered Company E, 82d Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as a private, and the regiment was assigned to the 11th army corps. He re-enlisted at Sandusky, Ohio, and became a member of Company D, 100th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. In the severe encounter with the enemy at Chancellorsville, Mr. Leibolt was actively engaged in the battle during one entire day, and was very badly wounded. He was shot through the knee and also through the cheek and nose. The honorable scars of these wounds he will carry to his grave. At this battle also, on the 2d of May, 1863, he was taken prisoner and held for two weeks. The prison fare was meal and water. He was then taken to Brook Station hospital and, at the end of two weeks, he was removed to the hospital at Alexandria, and remained three months. After being a member of the Union army for one year and three months he was honorably discharged at Columbus, Ohio . Mr. Leibolt was born in Germany, January 17, 1843, a son of John and Mary (Shunk) Leibolt. He married at Bellevue, Ohio, April 6, 1866, Christina Bullion, born in his native country, January 18, 1844, the daughter of Adam Bullion. They have a family of seven children, who were born: Mary, January 27, 1867; William, April 5, 1868; Katie, November 25, 1869; Herman, September 26, 1876; Edward, November 17, 1877; Lillie, in November, 1878; and Addie, April 6, 1883. Mr. Leibolt is engaged in business as a cooper, and resides at Bellevue, Ohio.

Richard Lemon

Enlisted at Monroeville, Ohio, in September, 1861, as a private in Company D, 3d Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. His regiment was assigned to the 2d brigade, 2d division, 23d army corps. At Columbus, Tennessee, January 4, 1864, he re-enlisted, entering the same company. Mr. Lemon experienced many severe encounters with the enemy. He took part in the battles of Shiloh, Woodville, Alabama, Missionary Ridge, Bowling Green, Lexington, Stone River, Huntsville, Alabama, Mineral Cove, Big Shanty, Lovejoy Station, Atlanta, Marietta, Stone Mountain, and a great many others of more or less note. During Kilpatrick’s raid they at one time advanced on the enemy, who were six lines deep, and were met with a volley that killed more than six hundred men. After charging several times the Union forces came out victorious and captured five hundred prisoners. They also made a raid at Selma on the rebel breastworks and took two hundred and fifty prisoners. At Gravel Spring, February 12, 1865, while digging post holes, Mr. Lemon was cut in the ankle. On the 14th of the month, although still lame, he was detailed to go on a scout three miles from camp. Here they met the rebels, and he was shot through the right leg. His horse fell on him and broke one of his ribs. He was carried away by Alexander Tittle and John Sweet. At the end of four years he was discharged at Columbus, Ohio . He is a member of C. B. Gambee Post, No. 33, G.A.R. The father of Richard Lemon was a member of Company F, 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was killed at Robertsons Cross Road, Virginia . John Edward, David, Jacob and William, all brothers of the subject of our sketch, were soldiers in the late war. The first named was a member of Company F, 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and died at Baltimore, Maryland, of camp diarrhea. The remaining brothers survived the service. Richard Lemon was born near Fremont, Ohio, December 4, 1840, a son of Jacob A. and Harriet (Mudge) Lemon. He married at Fremont, January 1, 1866, Mary Catharine Bolen, born near Fremont July 22, 1841, the daughter of Robert and Mary (Anspaugh) Bolen. They have one son and a daughter, who were born: Robert F., August 27, 1866; and Cinthia A., May 17, 1874. Mr. Lemon is a farmer, and resides near Bellevue, Ohio.

Edward Leonard

At the age of fifteen years enlisted in the army. He enrolled at Cleveland, Ohio, June 15, 1863, as a private in Company A, 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 2d division, 14th army corps. Mr. Leonard was promoted to corporal at Huntsville, Alabama, in November, 1864. His first engagement was under General Thomas at Tunnel Gap, July 18, 1863. His regiment was repulsed and enjoyed a good run, but were glad to receive re-enforcements and repay their enemies. On the second day of the engagement they took the rebel breastworks, four brass guns, a flag and a large number of prisoners. Many brave men were killed on both sides. During the two years, six months and nine days of Mr. Leonard’s life as a soldier he encountered the enemy in many severe skirmishes and hotly contested engagements. He was discharged at Cleveland, Ohio, on February 20, 1866. He was born at Nashville, Tennessee, a son of William Leonard. He is an engineer, and resides at Clyde, Ohio.

John Linebaugh

Entered the army at Fremont, Ohio. He enlisted as a private in Company D, 3d Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, and received promotions to corporal and then to first duty sergeant. He participated in the battles of Murfreesboro, Tennessee, Corinth, Mississippi, Missionary Ridge, Lookout Mountain, Kilpatrick’s raid around Atlanta, and many other encounters with the enemy. In one engagement he was struck by a ball, which knocked him down and broke the eagle on his belt. He was taken prisoner at the battle of Stone River, Tennessee, but not liking the idea of being taken to Libby prison, he ran away and escaped with safety, although more than one hundred shots were fired after him. At the end of three years of servie he was discharged at Nashville, Tennessee . Mr. Linebaugh was a soldier in the Mexican war. He served in Company C, 4th Ohio Infantry, and engaged in the battle of Pueblo and may skirmishes during the year which the war lasted. His father’s name was Peter Linebaugh. He married in Sandusky County, Ohio, January 25, 1851, Susanna Parish, born in Marion County, Ohio, February 4, 1832, the daughter of Joseph and Sarah (Johnson) Parish. Their children were born: Cynthia D., October 29, 1852, died October 7, 1864; Darwin C, February 11, 1855, died April 17, 155; Darwin Randolph, January 14, 1857; Sarah Ellanora, July 19, 1859; Ida Adelaide, January 5, 1862; George Franklin, May 17, 1867. Mr. Linebaugh is a farmer and a carpenter, residing near Fremont, Ohio .

Jonathan Loveberry

Enlisted at Camp Chase, Ohio, September 19, 1861, as a private in Company F, 1st Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. His regiment remained at Camp Chase on drill for three months, and then went to Louisville, Kentucky . They removed to Lebanon and went into winter quarters. About the middle of March they went to Nashville, Tennessee, Columbia, and Pittsburg Landing, where they arrived one day after the battle, and went into camp for ten days. They then marched to Corinth, Mississippi, Boonesboro, and returned to Corinth ; thence to Deckard Station. Mr. Loveberry served three years and was discharged at Louisville, Kentucky . He served three months in Company E, 17th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, enlisting at Somerset, Ohio . The regiment went to Parkersburg, West Virginia, and on a march to Ravenswood captured twelve bushwhackers. They returned to Zanesville, Ohio, and were discharged. Here they had a general street fight with the citizens, caused by water being thrown on one of the boys by a hose. Mr. Loveberry enlisted in the one hundred days service, May 2, 1864. He was elected first lieutenant. He was an excellent drill master, and performed his duties faithfully. He was discharged September 4, 1864. He was born in Perry County, Ohio, May 10, 1832. John and Barbara (Sherrich) Loveberry, his parents, are both now deceased. In Sandusky County, Ohio, September 1, 1860, he married Mary H. Moses, born in Richland County, Ohio, June 24, 1832, the daughter of Jacob and Catharine (Hess) Moses, both now deceased. They have five children, who were born: Laura E., September 15, 1861; Amanda S., June 15, 1863; Franklin F., September 2, 1864; Hattie I., March 5, 1866; and I. J., July 13, 1867. Mr. Loveberry is a farmer and lumber dealer.

Stephen McKinley

Answered the first call for soldiers and enlisted at Springfield, Illinois, in May, 1861. He enrolled as a private in Company C, 22d Illinois Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 2d brigade, 3d division, 17th army corps. During the three years that Mr. McKinley was in the service he passed through thirty battles, some of them very sharply contested. At Murfreesboro, Tennessee, his regiment was almost entirely annihilated, coming out of the battle with scarcely one hundred men. Mr. McKinley was taken prisoner during this engagement, surrendering after all hopes of escape were gone. He was held at Richmond, Virginia, four weeks and paroled, as the enemy had not enough provisions to keep their prisoners. He was exchanged at Benton Barracks, Missouri. In all of the hardships and dangers of march and engagement he performed his duty as a brave and faithful soldier. There was perhaps no regiment in the service that suffered greater loss in battle, or experienced more severe service, than did the regiment to which Mr. McKinley belonged. While on duty he was killed by a rebel sharpshooter, and now lies buried at Resaca, Georgia. A pension has been paid to Eliza and Martha McKinley by the government since May 28, 1864, the date of his death. He was born in County Armagh, Ireland, a son of John McKinley. He married, at Mansfield, Ohio, in the fall of 1851, Eliza Galvin, born in County Galloway, Ireland, a daughter of Patrick and Sarah (Jordan) Galvin. Two children were born to them. Martha J. and Mary J. on the 13th of July, 1853. The former resides at Clyde, Ohio, the latter is deceased. Mr. McKinley was, before his enlistment, a mason and resided at Clyde, Ohio.

Oliver M. Mallernee

September 10, 1861, enlisted at Monroeville, Ohio. He enrolled as artificer in Company D, 3d Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. Mr. Mallernee was appointed by Colonel Zahm regimental blacksmith, with the rank of sergeant. The most prominent of the battles in which he took part were those of the siege of Chattanooga, Tennessee, the siege of Atlanta, Georgia, and at Nashville, Tennessee, where he commanded a company of employees in the battle. His company was detailed to assist in burying the dead at the close of that battle. Having completed a service of three years and one month, he was discharged at Columbia, Tennessee, October 10, 1864. He is a member of Eaton Post, No. 55, G.A.R. Mr. Mallernee was born in Harrison County, Ohio, March 14, 1836, a son of William and Lydia (Burton) Mallernee. He married, at Clyde, Ohio, November 1, 1865, Mary Blake, born in England, in 1830, the daughter of William and Sarah (Banks) Blake. Their only son, William S., was born February 4, 1868. The first husband of Mrs. Mallernee was Elijah West. He served as a soldier in Company B, 169th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He died at Clyde, of disease contracted in the service, leaving two children, named Frank and Emma. Both are living. A pension was granted to his widow. Mr. Mallernee is engaged in business as a marble, coal and sewer pipe dealer at Clyde, Ohio, where he has resided since 1857. Until about 1870 he was engaged in the blacksmithing business.

Charles R. Mason

Entered the army in the defense of his country at Monroeville, Ohio, September 24, 1861. He enlisted as a private in Company I, 3d Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, was promoted to corporal and as such he veteranized, January 4, 1864, at Columbia, Tennessee. He took an active part in most of the engagements of his regiment. His experience as a cavalryman in active service was replete with incidents of personal danger and hardships, perilous escapes and individual bravery on the field of battle. During an engagement with the guerrillas at Pulaski, Tennessee, his horse was shot under him and he was taken prisoner. This occurred on the 12th of October, 1864. His enemies were going to hang him, but he made his escape. They had taken all of his clothing but his pants and shirt. After three weeks and three days of suffering, lying in swamps by day and traveling bare foot by night, he reached his regiment at Point of Rocks. A colored man assisted him in his escape and went with him to his regiment. Three years, eleven months and twenty days Mr. Mason was in the army, and was discharged at Edgefield, Tennessee, August 4, 1865. He died October 5, 1880, of bronchitis, contracted in the service. A pension for which he had filed an application before his death, is now paid to his widow and son. At East Norwalk, Ohio, he was born, June 20, 1842, a son of Rodney and Betsey (Booth) Mason. He married, at Clyde, Ohio, October 12, 1865, Julia A,. Collver. Mrs. Mason was born at Andover, Sussex County, New Jersey, September 5, 1842, the daughter of Simon B. and Eliza F. (Brown) Collver. Two children were born to them: Frank Rodney, on January 31, 1869, died June 12, 1870, and Frank Charles, born October 31, 1872. Mr. Mason was a farmer, and resided at Clyde, Ohio.

William Maurer

Became a member of Company K, 100th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, August 7, 1862, at Fremont, Ohio . He enlisted as a private, and his regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 2d division, 23d army corps. Mr. Maurer participated in the battles of Limestone Station, Columbia and Franklin, Tennessee, and took part in the campaign under General Cox against General Morgan. At Limestone Station the enemy were about two thousand strong, while the Union forces numbered but three hundred. They held the rebels at bay from twelve o’clock until four in the afternoon, when they were surrounded, and all except one man, who made his escape in some way, were taken prisoners. They were sent to Richmond, Virginia, and placed in Libby prison for a few days, and then sent to Belle Isle, where they remained for six months and suffered great hardships and privations. They were paroled in March, 1864, and sent via Annapolis and Baltimore, Maryland, to Columbus, Ohio. November 30, 1864, Mr. Maurer, at the battle of Franklin, Tennessee, was wounded in the left wrist by a minie ball. He walked to Nashville, a distance of twenty-five miles, before having his wound dressed, and entered the hospital. In a few days he was sent to the hospital at Covington, Kentucky, and thence on a furlough home. He returned at the end of forty days and remained until May 23, 1865, when he was mustered out of service. With the exception of the time spent in the hospitals and in prison, Mr. Maurer was with his regiment in all of their marches and engagements during the two years and ten months of his service. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. Daniel Maurer, uncle of William, was a soldier in the war of 1812. He served through the war and died at Ashland, Ohio. William Maurer was born in Ballville Township, Sandusky County, Ohio, January 31, 1840, a son of Isaac and May Ann (Ernsberger) Maurer. He married, at Fremont, Ohio, September 3, 1865, Eliza J. Worst, born in Ballville Township, December 7, 1845, the daughter of Jacob and Hannah (Parks) Worst. They have three children, who were born: Lilly L., March 6, 1867; Delphin Burdette, September 1, 1869, and Orpheus Clifton, September 12, 1871. Mr. Maurer resides near Fremont and is engaged in the cultivation of his farm.

N.D. Minkler

Entered the service at an early age. He enlisted at Sandusky, Erie County, Ohio, August 24, 1864, as a private in Company C., 128th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, the regiment detailed on guard duty at Johnsons Island, Lake Erie, Ohio. While in the performance of his duty here he received a severe rupture, September 13, 1864, and was taken to the hospital at Columbus, Ohio. At the end of two weeks he was discharged, and was taken with typhoid fever. He was sick for three months, and has never fully recovered from the effects of that attack. At the end of six weeks service he was discharged at Columbus, in September, 1864. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. He was born in Erie County, Ohio, May 21, 1846, the son of Daniel and Lucy (Smith) Minkler. He married, April 24, 1868, in Lorain County, Ohio, Emma Parkhurst. Mrs. Minkler was born in Lorain County, in 1847, the daughter of Edward and Cordelia (James) Parkhurst. They have three children, who were born: Mattie, March 1, 1869; Willie, December 23, 1873; Hattie, February 18, 1875. Mr. Minkler is janitor of the city hall and teamster of the fire department, at Fremont, Ohio.

Anton Misler

Enlisted at Cleveland, in the army of his adopted country in November, 1862. He entered Company G, 125th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as a private, and was promoted to corporal in April, 1864. The regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 2d division, 4th army corps. Mr. Misler took part in the battles of Dallas, Jonesboro and Lovejoy Station, Georgia, Spring Hill and Nashville, Tennessee, and in the severe encounter with the enemy at Chickamauga, Tennessee. Here Mr. Misler was wounded in the wrist, September 20, 1863. He was also wounded in the arm at Dallas, Georgia, May 30, 1864. At the battle of Chickamauga a rebel officer in Union uniform rode within hearing of Mr. Misler and gave the order not to fire on the men in sight, as they were members of the Union army. The boys in blue soon found out that this was a mistake, as they were fired upon and many killed. The battle of Dandridge was caused by the continued firing of a cavalryman, who brought the rebels out in full force. Mr. Misler was in the hospital several times on account of his wounds. He served three years, and was discharged at Camp Ervin, Texas. He is a member of C. B. Gambee Post, No. 33, G.A.R. In Germany, on the 23d of March, 1841, he was born, a son of Andrew and Frances (Eshenaur) Misler. He married at New Washington, Crawford County, Ohio, January 23, 1866, Elizabeth Lux, born in Rochester, New York, in 1843, the daughter of George and Catherine (Shelf) Lux. Their children were born: Mary, November 30, 1866, died February 1, 1874; Elizabeth, May 24, 1868; Michael, December 25, 1869; Frances, December 5, 1871; Joseph, August 28, 1873; Anna, December 10, 1875; Anthony, March 8, 1878; Catherine, January 30, 1880; Margaret, February 12, 1882; Louisa Isabel, July 23, 1884. Mr. Misler is a farmer, and resides near Bellevue, Ohio.

Robert A. Mitchell

Enlisted at Clearfield, Pennsylvania, August 23, 1862. He enrolled as a private in Company E, 149th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry “Bucktails.” Soon after his enlistment he was promoted to 3d sergeant and February 3, 1864 to 1st sergeant. April 22, 1864, he received the rank of 2d lieutenant, all for meritorious services. He engaged in many encounters with the enemy. Among the most prominent of the battles in which he took part were those at Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spotsylvania C.H., Weldon railroad, Hatchers Run, and Dabneys Mills. Some of these engagements lasted a number of days. From the 1st of May until the last of July his regiment lost four hundred men in killed, wounded and those taken prisoners. He was assigned to special duty at the headquarters of General Warren in charge of the division pioneer corps. They were engaged in building corduroy roads and bridges and often narrowly escaped capture. Mr. Mitchell was at one time quartermaster of the regiment. He was wounded at Petersburg and also at Gettysburg. The latter wound was in the hand and he only left the regiment long enough to have it dressed. Returning to his command he had charge of the picket line that night. June 18, 1864, on the Petersburg lines he was struck by a minie-ball receiving a wound in the neck and back. He crawled back on his hands and knees to a safe place and was removed to the field hospital and thence to City Point. Two years and ten months he was in the service of his country and was discharged at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, June 24, 1865. He was born in Pennsylvania, June 1, 1839, a son of James and Hester (Spackman) Mitchell. June 14, 1870, he married at Clearfield, Pennsylvania, Mary A. Morehead. Mrs. Mitchell was born in Perry County, Pennsylvania, December 3, 1845, the daughter of James and Mary (Shaffer) Morehead. Their children were born: Irma M., October 13, 1871; George H., August 16, 1873; Charles R. M., October 18, 1875; William L., March 26, 1882, and Gussie H., April 26, 1884. Mr. Mitchell is a farmer and his post office address is Helena, Ohio.

LeRoy Moore

Enlisted at Columbus, Ohio, as a recruiting officer. He entered the 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry as 2d lieutenant in Company F, and was promoted to captain January 4, 1862, having enlisted a full company. His regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 1st division, 15th army corps. In January, 1864, Captain Moore veteranized at Memphis Tennesse. He engaged in the battle of Pittsburg Landing, April 6-7, 1862, the siege of Corinth, battle of Jackson, Mississippi, and the siege of Vicksburg. After the surrender of Vicksburg, July 4, 1863, he had a second encounter with the enemy at Jackson, and went from there to Brandon. The regiment then went to Guntown, Mississippi, and June 12, 1864, Captain Moore shared the fate of many other brave men and was taken prisoner. He was held at Macon, Georgia, Charleston, South Carolina, Columbia, in the same State, Raleigh and Goldsboro, North Carolina. He was paroled for exchange and entered the Union lines at Wilmington, North Carolina, March 1, 1865. He was once detailed to run a mill for the purpose of grinding corn to supply Grant’s army who were cut off by VanDorn at Holly Springs. After two days the regiment left there somewhat hurriedly and in some way the mill caught fire and lighted them on their road. During three years and five months Captain Moore served his country with distinction, and was discharged at Annapolis, Maryland, March 5, 1865. He is past chaplain of Benedick Post, No. 26, G.A.R. December 28, 1836, he was born in Sandusky County, Ohio, a son of James and Harriet (Patterson) Moore. He married in his native county, November 9, 1869, Mate Dawley, born in Sandusky County, December 14, 1849, the daughter of Elisha and Sarah N. (Brush) Dawley. They have two children, Blanche, born September 29, 1870, now residing in Sandusky County; and James, born February 22, 1878, residing at Pemberville, Wood County, Ohio. Mr. Moore is engaged in business as a miller and resides at Clyde, Ohio.

James H. Morrill

Entered the army at Clyde, Ohio, February 22, 1864, as a private in Company F, 72d Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was at that time assigned to the 1st brigade, 2d division, 16th army corps. The first encounter Mr. Morrill had with the enemy was at Bolivar, Mississippi. The enemy retreated, our loss was slight. His next engagement was at Guntown, which resulted in a disastrous defeat. At Tupelo, Mississippi, he entered a three days engagement. Some prisoners were taken but, being out of provisions, they could not follow up the rebels as they wanted to do. At Oxford, Mississippi, they had a skirmish with the enemy and burnt the town. The next engagement of the regiment was at Abbeville. On September 2, they started from Memphis in pursuit of the rebel army to Devall’s Bluff, on the White River, attempting to cut them off, but they only succeeded in taking some prisoners and about all of their outfits. On the retreat at Guntown, Mr. Morrill was injured by being thrown from his mule. He was a soldier during sixteen months and was discharged at Louisville, Kentucky, June 3, 1865. Hugh White, a cousin of Mrs. Morrill, was a soldier in the Union army. He was killed at the battle of Stone River, Tennessee. December 29, 1836, Mr. Morrill was born in the State of Vermont, a son of William and Betsy (Brackett) Morrill. He married at Clyde, Ohio, July 3, 1854, Eliza Weaver, born in Huron County, Ohio, the daughter of Absalom and Susan (Rienid) Weaver. They have two children, Rolla, born May 20, 1855, and Cora, born, March 16, 1857; Rolla residing at Salina, Ohio, Cora at home. Mr. Morrill is a farmer and resides near Clyde, Ohio.

Harrison Mowrer

Laid down his life for his country. He enlisted at Fremont, Ohio, May 2, 1864, and became a member of Company K, 169th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. With his regiment Mr. Mowrer went to Fort Ethan Allen. Here he was engaged in the performance of guard duty and was attacked with typhoid fever. He was removed to the hospital at Mount Pleasant, and there died August 23, 1864. During two months and twenty-one days he was in the service. His father and mother, whose chief aid he was, have never applied for a pension. Harrison Mowrer was born in Pennsylvania, September 28, 1843, the second child of John B. and Elizabeth (Young) Mowrer. The other children were Harriet, the first-born, Robert and William. They are all deceased. Harried married Moses Ulch and their only child, Charles M. resides with his grandparents, John B. and Elizabeth Mowrer. Before his enlistment Harrison Mowrer was a farmer and resided near Lindsey, Ohio.

Frederick Myers

At the beginning of the war enlisted at Monroeville, Ohio, enrolling May 7, 1861. He entered Company G, 24th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as a private, and his regiment was assigned to the 3d brigade, 1st division, 4th army corps. From this enlistment he was discharged June 24, 1864, and he re-enlisted at Sandusky City, Ohio, September 28, 1864, as a member of Company A. 17th Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 12th army corps, under General Hooker. Mr. Myers took part in the battles of Greenbrier, West Virginia, Pittsburg Landing, Corinth, Perryville, and at Chickamauga, where the rebels charged eleven times, with no result but a great loss to themselves. He was wounded at the battle of Stone River, Tennessee, December 30, 1862. While detailed on special duty as advance guard at the battle of Lancaster, South Carolina, he was taken prisoner. A squad of rebels came suddenly upon the guard and after a short but sharp struggle captured them. Mr. Myers was held at Salisbury, North Carolina, for thirty-five days and then taken to Richmond and paroled April 5, 1865. He served three years, ten months and fifteen days, and was discharged at Camp Chase, Ohio, June 18, 1865. He is an honorary member of C.B. Gambee Post, No. 33, G.A.R. Mr. Myers was born in Pennsylvania, June 15, 1840, a son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Hetel) Myers. He married at Bellevue, Ohio, June 3, 1866, Susan Bookman, born in Bavaria, February 16, 1844, the daughter of Christian and Anna (Good) Bookman. They have three children who were born: Frederick C., August 5, 1867; Minna, October 30, 1871; and Eliza E., October 30, 1874. Mr. Myers is a miller and resides at Bellevue, Ohio.

George H. Myers

Entered Company A, 111th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as a private, at Fremont, Ohio, July 15, 1862. The regiment was assigned to the 3d brigade, 3d division, 23d army corps. Mr. Myers engaged in the battles of Horse Ferry, Campbell Station, siege of Knoxville, Strawberry Plains, French Broad, Rocky Face Ridge, Resaca, Burnt Hickory, Peach Tree Creek, Atlanta, Decatur, Jonesboro, Spring Hill, Franklin, Nashville, Wilmington, Kinston and Fort Anderson. He was several times detailed on scouting and foraging expeditions. On one occasion the boys heard a call from their colonel to come and help themselves to coffee. They climbed over a wall found themselves in a sheep pen. A little further on they secured some chickens and honey and on their return to camp they enjoyed their mutton and other provisions. Some times Mr. Myers and a comrade would go by themselves on a forage. They always returned well laden though they often traveled far to secure their rations. During the march through Tennessee when all of the men were tired and dusty a shout was heard in the front ranks. Mr. Myers went to see what it meant and found that some of the soldiers were chasing a rooster who was making good time through a corn field. He joined in the pursuit and soon captured the prize, much to the chagrin of the men who had been running after it for more than a mile. After an active service of three years, he was discharged at Cleveland, Ohio, July 15, 1865. He is a member of Lewis Baker Post, No. 172, G.A.R. In Hamilton County, Ohio, he was born September 22, 1840, a son of Henry and Nancy (Burk) Myers. He married at Fremont, Ohio, March 16, 1867, Isabelle Overmyer, born in Washington Township, Sandusky County, Ohio, the daughter of Peter and Mary (Lutz) Overmyer. They have four children, Haidee B., Merlin D., George H., and C. Frederick. Mr. Myers is a carpenter and resides at Lindsey, Ohio.

Jacob Neeb

Enlisted at Sandusky City, Ohio, September 11, 1864, as a private in Company I, 180th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was sent to Camp Chase, Ohio, and thence to Nashville, Tennessee . Mr. Nash was engaged in the battles of Kinston, or Wises Fork, Franklin and Nashville . He first went into the picket line at Nashville . At Kinston the rebels advanced on the picket line and drove them back to their regiment. The Union men then charged the enemy and captured their first line of works. On the third day they drove them across the Neuse River . From Kinston the regiment went to Raleigh, and from there to Goldsboro, North Carolina . A short distance from here they guarded the railroad, and were frequently attacked by bushwhackers. One night when out scouting they captured two bushwhackers whom they found in a planter’s house. For this service Lieutenant Prichett was promoted. During Mr. Neeb’s service of ten and one-half months he was almost continually on the march, and never missed a duty or an engagement of his regiment. He was discharged July 29, 1865. He was born at Nessau, in Europe, September 23, 1831. His parents, both now deceased, were John and Margaret (Gill) Neeb. He married in Sandusky county, Ohio, April 19, 1860, Margaret Schneider, born at Byron, Germany, October 17, 1836, the daughter of John Schneider, since deceased. Their children were born: Tina, April 14, 1861; Henry, May 14, 1862; Mary, November 24, 1864; Lizzie, March 3, 1866; Peter, November 17, 1867; Lena, April 5, 1870, died October 11, 1878; Charles Philip, August 7, 1872, died October 6, 1878; Rosena, September 13, 1874, died October 18, 1878; Minnie, January 5, 1879. Mr. Neeb is engaged in the cultivation of his farm near Gibsonburg, Ohio.

Andrew Nuhfer

Although not calling America his native land, enlisted in her defense at Columbus, Ohio . He entered Company D, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as second lieutenant, and was promoted to the rank of captain. His regiment was assigned to the 13th army corps. Captain Nuhfer entered with his company into her many engagements with the enemy, and at the battle of Shiloh, April 6, 1862, he was wounded by a minie-ball in the right leg. June 12, 1863, he was taken prisoner by General Forrest’s forces. The prisoners received nothing to eat or drink for twenty-four hours. They were stripped of their outer clothing, and Captain Nuhfer, on refusing to give up his hat, was struck on the head with a pistol and felled to the ground. They suffered greatly from the heat and want of water. After serving for three years and nine months he was discharged at Columbus, Ohio, by special order No. 82. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32 G.A.R. Mr. Nuhfer was born in Bavaria, Germany, October 29, 1819, the son of Nicholas and Eva (Weber) Nuhfer. He was married at Woodville, Ohio, to Elizabeth Schuler, who was born in Wittenburg, Germany, November 23, 1827, the daughter of John George and Agnes (Zimmerman) Schuler. Their ten children were born: George, August 17, 1844, resides in Fremont, Ohio; Carrie, August 17, 1846, living at Toledo, Ohio; Sophia, December 27, 1848; living at West Toledo; Kate, March 11, 1851, living at Toledo; Daniel, June 29, 1853, deceased; Amelia, August 4, 1855, resides at Manhattan, Ohio; Esther, February 28, 1858, living at Woodville; Charles, October 31, 1860, living at Toledo; Minnie, August 17, 1862, deceased; and Willie, December 19, 1865, now residing at Luckey, Ohio. Mr. Nuhfer is carrying on business as a hardware merchant at Woodville, Ohio.

Cyrus Odell

Answered the first call “to arms,” and enlisted May 28, 1861, at Fremont, Ohio . He enrolled as a corporal in Company E, 25th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to Milroy’s Independent Brigade, where they served for some time, and were then transferred to McLean ’s brigade, Schenk’s division, 11th corps, Army of Virginia. Mr. Odell took part with his regiment in the battles of Greenbrier, Alleghany, Cedar Creek, and entered upon the hardships of Pope’s campaign. They were marching or engaged with the enemy constantly for nineteen days, and their only rest was taken in moments snatched upon the battle-field. August 30, 1862, they were actively engaged in the second battle of Bull Run, Virginia . Here Mr. Odell was wounded in the left leg below the knee and in the right thigh by a minie-ball. He fell into the enemy’s hands, and was held on the field for three days and nights with no attention paid to his wounds. On the fourth day a Union surgeon, under a flag of truce, came to his aid, and the enemy finding that he was in no condition to be removed released him on parole. He now draws a well-deserved pension. At Alexandria, Virginia, December 16, 1862, he was discharged. Mr. Odell was born in Sandusky county, Ohio, April 30, 1840, a son of Samuel and Phoebe (McCormick) Odell. He was united in marriage, October 12, 1865, to Ann Maria Wheeler, the ceremony taking place in Huron county, Ohio, where she was born, July 27, 1846. Their daughter Lizzie was born September 1, 1866, and their son Willie F., April 18, 1868. Both children reside in Woodville with their parents. Mr. Odell is the proprietor of a saw mill and deals in lumber. His post office address is Woodville, Ohio.

Henry H. Overmyer

Enlisted May 2, 1864, in Washington township, Sandusky county, Ohio, as a private in Company K, 169th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the defense of Washinton City, and were stationed at Fort Ethan Allen and Fort Massy . Mr. Overmyer shared with his comrades the duties of the garrison, and enjoyed his life as a soldier. He was not called into any engagement, though the regiment encamped beside the 169th had quite an encounter with the enemy on the opposite bank of the Potomac River . His regiment remained behind on guard, though ready and anxious to join in the engagement. After a service of four months Mr. Overmyer was discharged at Camp Cleveland, Ohio, September 4, 1864. In Lewis Bake Post, No. 172, G. A. R. he holds the office of present adjutant. He was born in Washington township, December 2, 1842, a son of Peter and Mary ( Shively ) Overmyer. He married at Lindsey, Ohio, June 1, 1879, Margaret A. Walker. Mrs. Overmyer was born in Sandusky county, Ohio, March 16, 1843, the daughter of David and Nancy (Waggoner) Walker. They have a family of four sons and one daughter who were born: Waldo E., May 16, 1870; Nellie, October 14, 1872; George, December 2, 1877; Frederick, July 24, 1881; and Wilfred R., November 15, 1882. Mr. Overmyer is a horticulturist and apiarist, and resides at Lindsey, Ohio.

Samuel B. Overmyer

Gave his life in the defense of his country’s honor. He enlisted in Washington township, Sandusky county, Ohio, October 17, 1861, as a private in Company C, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. His regiment was assigned to the 2d brigade, 2d division, 15th army corps. During three years, less ten days, he served in the army, and shared with his regiment the hardships of the march and the dangers of their encounters with the enemy. At Guntown, Mississippi, June 12, 1864, he was, with many others, taken prisoner. He was confined in Andersonville for some time, and was then removed to Savannah, Georgia . Here he died in prison, October 9, 1864. A pension was granted to his mother. Samuel B. Overmyer was born in Washington township, Sandusky county, Ohio, October 6, 1842, a son of George L. and Mary (Bowman) Overmyer, both deceased. He was a farmer before the war, and resided near Lindsey, Ohio . B.B. Overmyer, for whom the above sketch was written, is a brother of Samuel B. He was elected second lieutenant of Company B, 3d O.M.I., on the 4th of July, 1863, and commissioned by Governor Tod on the 20th of that month. The militia were discharged in 1864 by a general order from the adjutant general of Ohio . B.B. Overmyer was born in Sandusky county, Ohio, July 26, 1840, and he married in this county, August 29, 1865, Mary M. Wallborn, daughter of William and Lydia (Rutter) Wallborn. Their children are: Emma R., born April 8, 1866; Samuel F., May 21, 1870; John C., November 20, 1871; Robert L., May 24, 1877; Arthur W., May 31, 1879.

Charles Page

A native of England, enlisted in the regular army of the United States December 18, 1869, at Toledo, Ohio . The recruits went from Toledo to Newport, Kentucky, for drill. They then went to Atlanta, Georgia, where they were assigned to Company B, 18th United States Infantry, and remained for one year, performing guard and fatigue duty. During the elections the regiment was sent to Vienna, Georgia, to quell a riot between the different factions. They were then sent to Louisville, Kentucky, to guard the polls, and were stationed at several other places on the same duty. While at Atlanta Mr. Page was sent as guard over twelve prisoners to Savannah . He also went with his regiment to Yorkville, South Carolina, to suppress the Ku-klux-klan, and was there about three months. There were one hundred and forty-one in the prison at one time. Mr. Page was detailed to special duty on several occasions. He drove the post ambulance during one year, and was in the quartermaster’s department about a year and a half. He had charge of the horses and wagons and the hauling of the commissary supplies of the regiment. During five years he was a soldier, and served with distinction. He was discharged December 18, 1874, at Columbia, South Carolina . He was born in Warwickshire, England, August 15, 1846, the son of William and Mary G. (Hillyard) Page. May 6, 1878, he married at Gibsonburg, Ohio, Mary G. Tice, born in Missouri, June 15, 1855, the daughter of Henry H. and Matilda (Richards) Tice. Three children have been born to them: Daniel W., March 21, 1879; Joseph H., May 6, 1881; and Charles E., September 19, 1883. Mr. Page is an employe of the railroad, and resides at Gibsonburg, Ohio.

John D. Parish

In August, 1861, enlisted at Fremont, Ohio, as a private in Company F, 49th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was promoted to sergeant for meritorious services in the field. He re-enlisted in 1861, at Strawberry Plains, Tennessee, entering the same company. Mr. Parish engaged in the battles of Green River, Shiloh, Stone River, Liberty Gap, Kenesaw Mountain, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Picketts Mills, and Resaca, Franklin and Nashville, Columbia River, Peachtree Creek, Perryville and Jonesboro . At the battle of Atlanta, July 22, 1864, Mr. Parish was wounded by a mini-ball through the right shoulder. He walked back to the reserve, and, although badly wounded, did not enter any hospital. He draws a pension of two dollars a month on account of his wound. From 1861 until December, 1865, when he was discharged at Columbus, Ohio, he served his country faithfully. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. Mr. Parish was born in Sandusky county, Ohio, September 25, 1844, a son of William and Simiah (Linebaugh) Parish, both now deceased. He married, in Sandusky county, January 27, 1876, Mary Tucker. Mrs. Parish was born in Sandusky county in 1849, the daughter of Nelson R. and Miranda (Burgoon) Tucker. They have four children: Perry N., Foster I, Boswell and Goldie. Mr. Parish is an engineer and farmer. His post office address is Fremont, Ohio.

Isaac Parrish

On September 10, 1861, enlisted as a private in Company D, 3d Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. The regiment was assigned to the 2d brigade, 2d division, 4th army corps. Mr. Parrish was promoted to first corporal, then to first duty sergeant. He was mustered into service after re-enlistment, at Nashville, Tennessee, January 27, 1864, and the regiment was assigned to the same command. Mr. Parrish participated in the battle of Stone River, Tennessee, and the encounter with the enemy at Selma, Alabama . He also took part in many other engagements in which his regiment was present. In June, 1864, the 3d Cavalry was detached to march to Kenesaw mountain. When they had reached a point near Noonday creek, five miles from their destination, they were attacked by a heavy force of Confederates, who had hurriedly amassed to check their progress. The Union force was advancing dismounted, and soon after the enemy opened fire Mr. Parrish was struck in the shoulder by a minie-ball, which threw him from his feet. With the assistance of a comrade he reached an ambulance and was taken to the field hospital. He was transferred to the post hospital, at Columbia, Tennessee, where he remained until the 6th of October. He was then granted a sick furlough and went home for five weeks, rejoining his regiment at Louisville, Kentucky, November 17, 1864. In December, 1863, Mr. Parrish was taken prisoner near Huntsville, Alabama . He was held on the field, marching every night for four days, when he made his escape during a stampede of the enemy. He draws a pension of four dollars a month. At the end of four years he was discharged at Edgefield, Tennessee, August 4, 1865. He is a member of Eugene Rawson Post, No. 32, G.A.R. Mr. Parrish was born in Sandusky county, Ohio, April 1,1837. His parents, William and Simiah (Linebaugh) Parrish, are both now deceased. He married, at Fremont, January 31, 1879, Sarah Elizabeth Smith, born in Marion county, Ohio, October 26, 1859, the daughter of Henry and Martha (Parrish) Smith. They have three daughters, born: Hattie Evaline, December 22, 1879; Simiah, August 7, 1881, and Maud Celestia, September 17, 1882. Mr. Parrish is a teamster, and lives at Fremont, Ohio.

James Wilson Park

Entered the Union army in the defense of his country at Toledo, Ohio, in 1863. He enrolled as private in Company G, 111th Ohio Voluntary Infantry. The regiment was assigned to service under Sherman . Mr. Park engaged in the marches of his regiment and in all of their encounters with the enemy, always performing his duty as a faithful soldier during the three years of his service. He was discharged at Columbus, Ohio, at the close of the war, and died April 24, 1880, at the age of thirty-seven years and two months. After the severe exposure and hardships of his life in the army he was never very strong. He was born in Ottawa county, Ohio, February 22, 1843, a son of James W. and Elizabeth (Longbrake) Park, both now deceased. He married at Fremont, Ohio, February 7, 1867, Almeda Royce. Mrs. Park was born in Findlay, Hancock county, Ohio, October 24, 1851. Her parents, both now deceased, were Martin and Sophia (Frederickton) Royce. Their children were born: William G., February 12, 1868; Addie F., November 15, 1869; Edward A., December 14, 1872, died September 24, 1875, and rests beside his father; Rosina L., July 31, 1874; Mattie, October 8, 1878; James W., November 26, 1880. Mr. Park was a tanner by trade, and proprietor of the Park Tannery, on the east side of the Sandusky river, at Fremont, Ohio.

John Peightal

Enlisted at Bellevue, Ohio, in September, 1861, as a private in Company A, 55th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 3d brigade, 4th division, and 11th then 20th army corps. He veteranized at Lookout Valley, Tennessee, in January, 1864. The regiment left Camp McClellan, Ohio, January 25, 1862. Their first engagement was at Moorefield, Virginia, then Bull Pasture Mountain, where they encountered Jackson ’s forces, and marched thence to Cross Keys and Strasburg. Mr. Peightal took part in more than thirty engagements, more or less severe. Among the most prominent of these battles, besides those already mentioned, are the battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Missionary Ridge, Resaca, Dallas, Kenesaw Mountain, siege of Atlanta, Georgia, Buzzard Roost, Marietta, Sherman’s March to the sea, participating in the battles at Savannah, Georgia, Goldsboro and Raleigh, North Carolina. After the surrender of Johnston, April 26, 1865, Mr. Peightal went to Washington, District of Columbia, and then to Louisville, Kentucky . He was discharged at Cleveland, Ohio, July 11, 1865, having been actively engaged in the service of his country about four years. He was born in Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, July 27, 1834, a son of John and Julia Ann (Brosius) Peightal. At Clyde, Ohio, March 1, 1860, he married Mary Ann Keller, born in Union county, Pennsylvania, October 16, 1839, the daughter of John and Catherine (Creek) Keller. Their children were born: John William, April 3, 1861; Joseph Henry, April 19, 1863; Mary Catherine, June 20, 1866; Emma Elizabeth, October 3, 1868; Cora Ellen, December 3, 1870, died in September, 1872; Anna Allen, May 4, 1873; Lesley Alton, November 11, 1875; Ella M., September 5, 1880. Mr. Peightal is a farmer, and resides in Green Creek township, Sandusky county, Ohio.

John Pelton

Answered the first call for soldiers. He enlisted at Leary, Ohio, April 21, 1861, in the three months service, entering Company I, 8th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. In September, 1861, he re-enlisted at Fostoria, Ohio, as a private in Company K, 49th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Mr. Pelton was with his regiment in the battles of Pittsburg Landing, Corinth, Stone River, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Perryville, Chattanooga, Resaca, Franklin, Kenesaw Mountain, Dallas, Georgia, and Barnett Hills. He was detailed to duty in Battery A, 1st Ohio Light Artillery, and here he saw a great deal of fighting. At the battle of Dallas, Georgia, May 27, 1864, he was wounded by a minie-ball, which destroyed his nasal bone. He was taken prisoner at the battle of Stone River, and held four hours, when he made his escape. He was re-captured and again escaped. Morgan’s men made him a prisoner, but he took leave of them in the same manner. During four years and eight months he was in the army, and was discharged at San Antonio, Texas, in December, 1865. Mr. Pelton was born at LaGrange, Lorain county, Ohio, August 26, 1842. His parents are David Pelton and Hannah (Smith) Pelton, the latter now deceased. At Findlay, Ohio, February 11, 1864, he married Julia A. Randall, born at Delaware, Ohio, January 22, 1847, the daughter of Israel and Lavina (Navel) Randall. Their children were born: Isadora, November 22, 1864; Charles D., November 11, 1866; Daniel, February 8, 1869; George, September 24, 1871; John, November 17, 1873; Curtis, January 28, 1875; Charlotte, March 7, 1878, and Oliver, June 14, 1880, died July 14, 1880.

Austin G. Perin

Enlisted at New York City, July 15, 1861, as a private in Company K, 65th New York Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 3d brigade, 1st division, 6th army corps. Mr. Perin re-enlisted February 21, 1864, entering the same company, with the rank of 2d lieutenant. He was detailed to an engineer corps at Charlottsville, Virginia, and engaged in a drawn battle with the enemy. He was then transferred to the Western flotilla, at Columbus, Kentucky, and had a skirmish, in which the Union boys were victorious. They followed the rebels to Island No. Ten, Tennessee, and in the battle here the loss on the Confederate side was very large in killed, wounded and those taken prisoners. Pursuing the balance of the rebel army to Fort Pillow, they engaged in a gunboat encounter, and then went to Memphis, where they had a severe battle. There were eight gunboats on each side when the battle began, but the enemy lost seven of their boats, and many of their men were drowned. On the way up the Red River they captured a transport boat, the Clara Dolson. Mr. Perin, with nine others, took charge of her and went to St. Charles . At this place they had an encounter with the enemy and were victorious. They then returned to Memphis, remained three weeks, and then went to Vicksburg, for four weeks bombarding the town at every opportunity. Mr. Perin was then transferred to a gunboat at Cincinnati, Ohio, and was employed in guarding Island No. Ten during three weeks. He was soon after honorably discharged, at Cairo, Illinois . After remaining at home one year he re-enlisted and was sent to the Army of Potomac, in time to join in the battle of the Wilderness, under Grant. He remained in this command until the close of the war, taking part in the final battle. He was discharged at the end of a service of three years and three months, at Halls Hill, Tennessee, July 21, 1865. He is a member of Potter Post, No. 105, G.A.R. Romain C. Hopkins, brother of Mrs. Perin, belonged to Company H, 55th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was wounded at the battle of Resaca, and died from the effects of his wound, but his friends could never find his final resting place. Mr. Perin was born in Sandusky county, Ohio, August 20, 1841, a son of Willard and Lucy (Gale) Perin. He married at Sandusky City, Ohio, January 31, 1865, Desdemona Hopkins, born at Republic, Ohio, August 11, 1841, the daughter of Zebulon and Elizabeth (Chapen) Hopkins. They have ten children, born: Hattie L., August 12, 1866; Leo G., June 5, 1868; Percy W., March 5, 1870; Flora L., October 5, 1871; Austen Gale, February 20, 1873; Charles Ross, December 1, 1874; Gertie, September 10, 1876; Irwin J., May 8, 1879; Bloomie Bessie, January 14, 1881; Mary E., September 17, 1883. Mr. Perin is a farmer and resides near Green Springs, Ohio.

George W. Peterson

Enlisted at Fremont, Ohio, October 9, 1861, as a private in Company F, 72 ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was assigned to the 2d brigade, 2d division, 16th army corps. At Germantown, Tennessee, January 1, 1864, Mr. Peterson veteranized with his regiment. He took part in the battles of Shiloh, Pea Ridge, Corinth, Memphis, Tishomingo Creek, Guntown, two engagements at Jackson, and the encounters with the enemy at Champion Hills, Vicksburg, besides many other engagements. At the battle of Shiloh, April 6, 1862, the 72d was called out in such a hurry that they had scarcely time to dress. When the enemy was driven back eighty of the rebels lay dead in front of the regiment. Mr. Peterson was ruptured during this engagement. At Holly Springs, while foraging, he narrowly escaped capture. The night before the Guntown battle Company F drew rations for seventy-seven men, and the day following the rebels captured every thing, and all of the men but thirteen. Mr. Peterson was among the fortunate number who escaped, but he was without food or ammunition and one hundred and thirty miles from Memphis . They marched to the last named place in two nights and one day. Leaving Memphis they went to Little Rock, Arkansas, by boat, and marched thence to Kansas City, and returned to Jefferson City, Missouri . They marched two days and nights through the snow. Two men in Company F were barefooted and many were poorly provided with shoes and stockings. During this raid fifteen hundred rebels were killed, two hundred were made prisoners and four hundred horses were captured. At the end of an active service lasting four years and five months, Mr. Peterson was discharged, with his regiment at Vicksburg, September 11, 1865. Before entering the 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Mr. Peterson had served five months in the 3d Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, Company D. He is past chaplain of Hamilton Post, No. 90, G.A.R. He was born in Franklin county, Ohio, January 29, 1837, a son of Adam and Rachael ( Griffin ) Peterson. He married at Fremont, Ohio, September 11, 1870, Leah Donnels, born in Sandusky county, February 8, 1839, the daughter of John Donnels. Three children have been born to them: Ernest, June 9, 1871; Charles E, April 23, 1874, and Clarence Murl, August 27, 1883. The first wife of Mr. Peterson was Mary Jane Slaughterback. The children by this marriage were born: John, September 9, 1862; William H., November 9, 1864; and Albert, October 9, 1867. Mr. Peterson is a laborer, and resides at Rollersville, Ohio.

Henry Phillips

Entered the ranks at Albany, New York, April 19, 1861. He enlisted in Company D, 22d New York Volunteer Infantry, and the regiment was assigned to the 1st brigade, 1st division, 1st army corps. He re-enlisted at Granville, New York, in 1863, entering the same regiment. Mr. Phillips participated in the battles of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Cedar Mountain, Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, Cane River, Mobile, Fort Blakely, Spanish Fort, and many other engagements, besides about twenty skirmishes. At Alexandria, Louisiana, the regiment had a severe encounter with the enemy. Twenty-seven horses were killed. Mr. Phillips was wounded and lay for two and one-half hours under a horse. He was found by his comrades and carried to the rear. He was removed to Moranza, near the mouth of the Red river . At Clayburn, the rebels announced that they were going to capture the boys in blue, but they made a mistake. Mr. Phillips captured their palmetto flag, presented to the Clayburn guards. While marching back from Rappahannock Station, toward Bull Run, Mr. Phillips fell out of ranks to get a canteen of water. He thought that there would be a battle and he would get out of it, but the rebels swung out in line of battle from the woods, and he had the satisfaction of using fifteen rounds of ammunition. Two batteries were brought to the rear of the enemy and they were driven back. Mr. Phillips was discharged June 22, 1863, from first enlistment, and at Albany, New York, June, 1865, from second enlistment. He was born in Sandusky county, Ohio, near Fremont, September 12, 1837, a son of John and Katie (Overmyer) Phillips. He married at Rutland, Vermont, September 12, 1860, Augusta Wright, born at Manchester, Vermont, the daughter of Martin and Hannah (Woodard) Wright. They have four children: Henry Clinton, Augusta, Martin and Pamelia. Mr. Phillips is a farmer, and resides at Vickery, Sandusky county, Ohio .

George Pittenger

Enlisted at Clyde, Ohio, October 31, 1861, as a private in Company A, 72d Ohio Volunteer Infantry. His regiment was assigned to the 3d brigade, 2d division, 15th army corps. He veteranized at Germantown, Tennessee, in January, 1864. Mr. Pittenger was actively engaged in the hard-fought battle of Shiloh, and from this battlefield to Holly Springs, his regiment skirmished every day. The enemy burnt the town and all the provisions it contained, but the Union army was well supplied with food, and marched on to Memphis, Tennessee . They had many severe engagements and lost many brave men. The regiment then went to Lake Providence, crossed the Mississippi river at Grand Gulf, and were worn out when they entered the battle at Jackson, Mississippi, but they were victorious and captured guns, provisions and many prisoners. Then drove the enemy over Champion Hills and across Black River into Vicksburg, Mississippi, when they entered upon the siege of Vicksburg, and captured the city; afterward were in a number of battles, among the hardest were Guntown, Tupelo and Nashville . The 72d never turned their backs on their enemies. Mr. Pittenger was discharged, on account of chronic diarrhea, at Camp Chase, Ohio, at the end of an active service of four years. He is a member of Eaton Post, No. 55, G.A.R. He was born, in 1839, at Manchester, New York, a son of Henry and Fannie (Piper) Pittenger. He married at Clyde, Ohio, January 1, 1866, Lydia Craig. Mrs. Pittenger was born in Sandusky county, March 1, 1843, the daughter of Lewis and Harriet (Derlam) Craig. Three children have been born to them: Bertie,