THE TOLEDO STATE HOSPITAL

Local History Collections

Collection ID: LH 422
Location: LH-422

(Description ID: 606954)

Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Library and Museums 

Toledo State Hospital

LH-422

Introduction
Agency History
Scope and Content
Inventory

 

Introduction

The materials in this collection were acquired from Sharon Yaros, who collected, compiled, and wrote materials for the hospital’s history through the years.

 

Agency History

 In the latter part of the nineteenth century, Northwest Ohio found itself without proper medical attention and protection for its mentally ill citizens. The General Assembly saw the need for a facility, however, the state could only provide $600,000 for the construction of the facility.  Statistics showed that existing asylums were constructed for no more than $1,500 per capita. General Roeliff Brinkerhoff, a member of the State Board of Charities, promoted  the plan of detached buildings, called the “cottage system”.  The cost of construction and equipment did not total more than $600 per capita.  His plan was a radical departure from the other asylum construction at that time.  Governor Charles Foster was interested in the project and organized a House Committee, naming Noah Swayne of Toledo as chairman.  After careful deliberation, a commission of the state officers fixed the location near Toledo. The site selected for the construction was a remote 150-acre tract of land donated by Lucas County to the state.

Thirty-two buildings were contracted for and completed by the time the first patients were received into the institution on January 6, 1888. The site consisted of twenty cottages, two strong wards, two infirmary wards, two hospital buildings, two dining room buildings, an administration building, chapel, kitchen and bakery, laundry, storehouse and boiler house.

Dr. H.A. Tobey was appointed superintendent on November 17, 1886. He remained in this position for more than nineteen years.  His first staff consisted of two assistant physicians, a secretary, steward, financial officer and matron.  By 1889, two more physicians and a storekeeper were added to the staff.  Additional attendants were hired in proportion to the number of patients in the hospital.  The ratio was one attendant for thirteen patients.

In the early years the majority of patients were transferred from other hospitals. By 1890, patients were brought in by court commitment from the community.  When admitted, the patients were given a thorough physical examination, diagnosed and classified under four types of mental disorders: congenital, mania, melancholia, or dementia.  In 1888, the average number of residents during the year was 734.

Although launched with some misgivings, Toledo State Hospital fulfilled the expectations of its supporters. All appropriations for the first 10 years totaled $855,021.58 bringing the per capita cost of construction and equipment per inmate to about $610.  The cottage construction plan, which was the hospital’s principal innovation, proved successful.  Dr. Tobey believed that the diversion, as well as useful employment, was one of the greatest means for restoration of the mentally disturbed.  Entertainment was varied and frequent.  Shows and weekly dances were held under an open tent or in one of the dining rooms prior to the construction of the auditorium in 1890.  Every patient was encouraged to engage in something to occupy the time.  The men did much of the work in improving the grounds.  Over 2,000 trees and shrubs were planted and an artificial lake was excavated.  On the second floor of the Industrial Building, constructed in 1907, the female patients worked at making rugs, weaving and fancy work. By 1899, 240 acres were under cultivation for essential garden and farm produce.  A greenhouse for propagating plants was built in 1905 and hog-pens and fences were added to increase the hospital meat supply.

By 1905, the average number of patient residents had risen to 1,766. A need for building maintenance to original buildings, construction of additional space to support new equipment, therapies and techniques was evident. A high degree of correlation existed between the expansion in the programs of Toledo State Hospital and the progress made in the whole area of mental hygiene in the years subsequent to the First World War. As the public became more enlightened about mental illness, the hospital, along with other institutions, felt the first stages of overcrowding and undertook to expand its facilities.

New admission policies in 1925 made it possible for a person to commit him/herself voluntarily with the provision that he/she stay at least six weeks in the hospital. Up to this time, many who needed treatment did not receive it because they did not want to go through court procedings.  Several clinics were opened.  One clinic provided for the treatment of neurosyphilis and another established a Mental Hygiene Clinic at the District Nurses’ Association headquarters.  This clinic was primarily for the benefit of outpatients from the hospital, however, due to the demands of the community, referrals from various family agencies and city hospitals were also accepted. 

Other innovations during this period included the development of a Medical Library and a Clinical Unit comprised of an X-ray room, dental office, eye, ear, nose and throat department, medical staff room and the Social Service office. A training school for nurses was organized in 1919.  The course consisted of a two year program which included courses pertinent to the nursing problems in a psychiatric hospital.  The Occupational Therapy Department was established with a staff composed of a chief therapist, two nurses, and two attendants.

A salesroom was opened to the public where furniture lamps, toys, rugs and novelties made by the patients were sold. A beauty shop was opened and operated by a licensed graduate in hair styling.

Many improvements and renovations were continually made to the physical plant during the years to meet the growing need for better and larger facilities. A medical-surgical building was completed in 1930, a nurses’ home and library were completed in 1939.  Golf had become a popular sport and a nine-hole course was laid out and developed.  There were numerous tournaments between the patients and employees.

Hydrotherapy, occupational therapy, psychotherapy, malaria therapy and medication were the principal methods of treatment.  A determined effort was made to reduce the amount of physical restraint.  Insulin and metrazol therapy were begun in 1931; electric shock treatment in 1941.  It was the policy to prescribe a daily program that would consume the time of the new, as well as the convalescent patient.

In 1944, the medical organization was comprised of the superintendent, eight assistant physicians, a dentist, druggist, superintendent of nurses, two psychiatric social workers, X-ray technician and a lab technician. There were 425 employees, including student nurses.  The school of nursing consisted of an accredited 3-year basic school, an affiliating two month school in psychiatric nursing for students in training in general hospitals, and a graduate school.  A three to six month course was also offered to the United States Senior Cadet students. Protestant and Catholic chaplains were both employed full time, and religious services were conducted throughout the year. 

The activities of the hospital were considerably curtailed because of the shortage of help and other conditions caused by World War II. With the urgent demand for nurses by the military, twenty-seven graduates entered the service.  The three-year school of nursing was discontinued because of the shortage of personnel.  An extraordinary effort was made by the hospital farm to produce as much food as possible to assist in the war effort.  There were 585 acres plus 500 leased acres under intensive cultivation.  The dairy, piggery and poultry divisions all maintained high production records. 

In the years following the war, a greater number of aged persons was being admitted. This caused a large part of the overcrowding.  In 1955, the daily population peaked at 3075.  To relieve the overcrowding, the Ohio Legislature of 1947 appropriated the funds for the start of the new receiving hospital.  The north wing was completed in 1948; front and south wings in 1953 and two west wings in 1958 to bring the capacity of the building to 220 patients.  In 1960 the 84- bed medical-surgical wing was added.

By 1957, there was a beginning decline in the average daily population. This was attributed to an increase in the medical staff, an increase in the social service programs and the use of new tranquilizing drugs. 

Several buildings that were condemned as unsafe were razed in 1959. In 1960, the new central maintenance building was completed and in 1963 a new heating plant was installed.  A central food service unit in the main kitchen, bakery and employees’ cafeteria were all opened.

The dairy operation was eliminated in 1962, but the farm organization continued to function providing the hospital with pork, vegetables, and fruit. The lawn and greenhouse sections maintained the grounds and golf course and supplied the wards with potted plants and flowers.

In 1964, the medical organization of the hospital was comprised of the superintendent, twelve assistant physicians, a clinical psychologist, pathologist, radiologist, dentist, druggist, superintendent of nurses and other professional personnel. The medical staff was assisted by a consulting staff of Toledo specialists.  There were 809 employees. An accredited three- month affiliating course in psychiatric nursing was conducted for students in training in general hospitals.  The average number of patient resident was 3290. 

At the time of admission, the patient was assigned to a psychiatrist who made a complete mental and physical examination to determine the patient’s diagnosis and mode of treatment. The most common form of therapy was the use of drugs.  In some cases electro-convulsive therapy was used.  The psychiatrist called upon the psychology department for help in both diagnosis and treatment.  The psychologist performed diagnostic testing and worked directly with the patients, using individual and group psychotherapy.  This department completed several research projects with adolescents and chronically ill.

The Activities Therapies Department was under the direction of a coordinator so that the direction and application of activities for patients could be therapeutically applied. The departments included occupational therapy, recreational therapy, patients’ library, industrial therapy and the voluntary services division.

A vocational rehabilitation counselor helped the patients to find employment or to train for certain types of employment. Patients were counseled in his/her employment needs both prior to and after release from the hospital.

The hospital district was composed from seventeen counties in Northwestern Ohio: Allen, Auglaize, Defiance, Erie, Fulton, Hancock, Hardin, Henry, Lucas, Mercer, Ottawa, Paulding, Putnam, Sandusky, Van Wert, Williams and Wood. An after-care clinic was located at the receiving hospital and clinics were held monthly in Lima, Sandusky, and Defiance.  The clinics were designed to assist the patient in making a satisfactory adjustment in the community upon release from the hospital.  The latest addition to the hospital’s program was the opening of the community services unit.  The facility provided follow-up care for released patients as well as a facility for seeing clients on an out-patient basis.

The Toledo State Hospital was one of the state’s first mental institutions to have the support of a women’s auxiliary. It was organized in 1953 and was active in fund raising to purchase comforts for patients and to facilitate operation of the staff.  They worked to acquaint and educate the public about the work being done at Toledo State Hospital and to bring about a better understanding of mental illness in the community.

The following persons have occupied the office of Superintendent:

Dr. H.A. Tobey, 1886-1906; Dr. G. R. Love, 1906-1919; Dr. O. O. Fordyce, 1919-1946; Dr. J.E. Duty, 1946-1968. (Adapted from the History of Toledo State Hospital by Lee G. Troy, n.d.)

Throughout the history of the facility, there was a need to bury those individuals who died at the institution and were never claimed by family members. As recently as 2008, burial plots and numbered markers have been identified.  This process was performed at the possible grave locations utilizing a ground penetrating radar system.  The numbered marker sites were exposed and linked to the names of the individuals buried at that specific location. Memorial Day celebrations materials are recorded in the history of the Toledo State Hospital for the years 2008, 2009, 2010.

 

Scope and Content

The materials in this collection consist of copies and originals dating from 1888 to 2010 of photographs of buildings, staff, grounds, activities ; annual reports; institutional records; medical reports; documentation of treatment and therapies; newspaper articles; census records; cemetery research and records, Ohio legislation, and histories. The materials were originally compiled and placed on flash drive by Sharon Yaros. They were printed out by Sandra Best, Mansucripts Division volunteer, and organized in a series of folders. Also indluced in this collection are some hundreds of postcards collected and preserved by Sharon Yaros.

Inventory

Ac. 5956    

2 linear ft.                                                                                           

 

Folder #1

1888 News Articles and Clippings

The collection from the Toledo State Hospital contains newspaper articles and newspaper clippings 1888-1956;   various random articles printed in hardcopies (individuals are listed alphabetically by date, newspaper and location); locations include the following: Chillicothe, OH; Coshocton, OH; Delphos, OH; Dixon, IL;  Elyria, OH;  Fort Wayne, IN; Indianapolis, IN; Ironwood, MI; Lima, OH; Mansfield, OH; Marion, OH; New Salem, OH; Newark, OH;  Reno, NV; Richwood, OH; Sandusky, OH; Toledo, OH; Troy, OH; Troy, NY;  and Zanesville, OH

 

Folder #2

Memorial Day Celebration 2008                                                                         

Black and white images of friends and participants from the Veterans Memorial Day program held at the Toledo State Hospital grounds in 2008

 

Folder #3

Memorial Day Celebration 2009                                                                         

Black and white images of friends and participants from the Veterans Memorial Day Program held at the Toledo Sate Hospital Cemetery grounds in 2009; also black and white images documenting the numbered cemetery stones linked to the individual patients from the Toledo State Hospital

 

Folder #4

Memorial Day Celebration 2010                                                                                  

Process of the monument recovery;   a black and white image of the people who participated in the probing, digging, and recovery of the stone markers;  Black and white image of a monument commemorating patients who were in the Toledo State Hospital from 1888-1922.

 

Folder #5

Articles Cemetery                                                                                                          

Toledo State Hospital Cemetery Reclamation Project Newsletter, Vol.1 Issue 1, 2007-2008

 

Folder #6             

Cemetery Brochure                                                                                                          

 Brochure from 2007 publicizing the Toledo State Hospital cemetery reclamation project; short history of the Toledo State Hospital

 

Folder #7

Cemetery Map                                                                                                       

Oct. 6, 1977 drawing of the Old Cemetery at Toledo State Hospital

 

Folder #8

Death Certificates Toledo State Hospital;                                                                         

Printed copies of death certificates A-B

 

Folder #9

Death Certificates Toledo State Hospital                                                  

Printed copies of death certificates C-E

 

Folder #10

Death Certificates Toledo State Hospital                                                                               

Printed copies of death certificates F-H

 

Folder #11

Death Certificates Toledo State Hospital                                                                               

Printed copies of death certificates I-L

                            

Folder #12

Death Certificates Toledo State Hospital                                                                               

Printed copies of death certificates M-R

 

Folder #13

Death Certificates Toledo State Hospital                                                                               

Printed copies of death certificates S-T

 

Folder # 14

Death Certificates Toledo State Hospital                                                                               

Printed copies of death certificates U-Z

 

Folder #15

Governor’s Deed State of Ohio                                                                                       

Deed preparation and transfer of property to the Medical College of Ohio, Effective October 29, 1993 by

Governor George V. Voinovich

 

Folder # 16

Ground Penetrating Radar Survey                                                                      

Copy of 2009 power point describing the site, process and results in locating grave sites

at the Toledo State Hospital cemetery

 

Folder #17

House Bill #398                                                                                                  

Copy of HB #398 requiring Department of Mental Health to create information about patients, buried, entombed, or inurned in the cemetery located on the grounds of or adjacent to the grounds of Toledo State Hospital.

 

 

Folder #18

House Bill #372

Deed from the State of Ohio to transfer land to Medical College of Ohio, June 24, 1993

 

Folder #19

Medical College of Ohio Cemetery Purchase

Description of cemetery parcel being transferred to the Medical College of Ohio with black and white images and drawings

 

Folder #20

Morgue

Black and white images of morgue built in 1888; architectural drawing and replacement cost for the structure.

 

Folder #21

Research Toledo State Hospital Cemeteries/Burial Records

Ohio Code #5121.11 identify burial expense, alphabetical listing of patients, date of death, cause of death; Toledo Blade article published 2008 about reclaiming burial sites of forgotten

 

Folder #22

Toledo State Hospital Cemetery Photographs

Five black and white images of grave stones in the Toledo State Hospital cemetery

 

Folder #23

Toledo State Hospital #1

Black and white images of grave stones, numbered markers and flags marking possible grave sites.

 

Folder #24

Toledo State Hospital #2

Black and white images of grave stones, numbered markers and flags marking possible grave sites.

 

Folder #25

Adams Township Lucas County Ohio

Maps of Adams Township from 1861-to unknown date

 

Folder #26

Annual Report 1888

A seventy-four page detailed accounting of population, expenses, trustees, officers, maintenance and budget for the fiscal year ending November 15, 1888

 

Folder #27

Annual Report 1894

A sixty-three page detailed accounting of population, expenses, trustees, officers, maintenance and budget for the fiscal year ending November 15, 1894

 

Folder #28

Annual Report 1897

A fifty-six page detailed accounting of population, expenses, trustees, officers, maintenance and budget for the fiscal year ending November 15, 1897

 

Folder #29

Annual Report 1898

A sixty-one page detailed accounting of population, expenses, trustee, officers, maintenance and budget for the fiscal year ending November 15, 1898

 

Folder #30

Architect Edward O. Fallis

Information about Edward. O. Fallis, architect for the Toledo State Hospital to include tombstones and obituary from Toledo Blade circa 1927

 

Folder #31

Toledo Insane Asylum Buildings, Circa 1890

Black and white images of Toledo State Hospital buildings, dining room, and grounds.

 

Folder #32

Early Newspaper Articles Toledo State Hospital

Newspaper articles from a variety of newspapers circa: 1903-1960

 

Folder #33

Toledo State Hospital photographs owned by Snell Family, Toledo, OH

Variety of black and white images from the Toledo State Hospital including; dairy barn, canning project, various buildings, water tower and kitchen.

 

Folder #34

Toledo Mental Health Center 100-Year Celebration (title description only)

 

Folder #35

Toledo State Hospital Letterheads

Samples of letterhead from the Toledo State Hospital showing institutional transitions

 

Folder #36

Longview State Hospital Video

Available on flash drive only

 

Folder #37

McKecknie and Oswald Photographs

Black and white images of Toledo State Hospital buildings from the McKecknie and Oswald Photograph Studio

 

Folder #38

Ohio Mental Health Law 1831

A copy of the 1831 Ohio Mental Health Law for the safe keeping of Idiots, Lunatics, Insane persons, the protection of their property and other purposes.

 

Folder #39

Paul Dunbar

A promissory note from Paul Dunbar to Dr. H.A. Toby in the amount of $215.

 

Folder #40

Toledo Insane Asylum 1888-1894 [1893-1894]

Weekly Bill of Fare (dining room menus) for patients at the Toledo State Hospital

 

Folder #41

Urns

Black and white images of the large urns that decorated the front of buildings and driveway entrances at the Toledo State Hospital.

 

Folder #42

United States Census 1900-1910-1920

Census records from 1900-1920 for the population at the Toledo State Hospital, Adams Township, Lucas County, OH

 

Folder #43

Toledo Hospital Histories

Timeline for the Toledo Mental Health Center Centennial report-1888-1988; Toledo Mental Health Center Milestones, 1914 ;  A Handbook of the Public Men and Public Institutions of Ohio Formation of the North-West Territory 1787-July 1, 1901; The History of Toledo State Hospital by Lee G. Troy; A History of Medical Practice in Toledo and Maumee Valley Area, 1600-1990;  A New Departure in the Treatment of Insane.

 

Folder #44

Weather Reports 1887

A copy of the September 1887 Monthly Weather Review.

 

Folder #45

1974 Toledo State Hospital Photographs

Sixteen black and white images of the buildings that were part of the Toledo State Hospital in 1974

 

Folder #46

Aerial Photographs of the Hospital

Eight black and white aerial photographs dating from 1931

 

Folder #47

Artifacts from the Toledo State Hospital

Thirty-three black and white images show a variety of artifacts found on a hillside by Swan Creek: glass bottles, dishes, decorative pottery, stove, metal handle/hinges, brick, medicine bottles, pipe bowl and stem, brick and glass button.

 

Folder #48

Auditorium

Three black and white images show the main stage, side and rear views of the auditorium at Toledo State Hospital

 

Folder #49

Chapel

Black and white images reveal the St. Dymphna Chapel at various stages on the grounds of the Toledo State Hospital; Chapel and Shed prior to demolition, chapel ca. 1970;  article from the Catholic Chronicle, May12, 1978, “St. Dymphna Chapel at TMHC Awaiting Wrecker’s Ball”;  an article (source unknown) St. Dymphna goes ecumenical;  short history of the chapel, stained glass window from chapel.

 

Folder #50

Demolition of Buildings at Toledo State Hospital

A pictorial history of fifteen black and white images of the demolition of buildings at the Toledo State Hospital on November 1981

 

Folder #51

Laundry Fire, May 1981

The fifteen black and white images document the fire at the Toledo State Hospital laundry building.

 

Folder #52

Toledo State Hospital Cottage Artifacts

Forty-three black and white images documenting the artifacts that were discovered at the cottage sites of the Toledo State Hospital including bricks, tile, grates, flooring, wall plaster, nails, spoon, steps and foundation of the cottages.

 

Folder #53

Toledo State Hospital Geriatric Center Dedication

The architectural drawing of the Geriatric Center and a copy of the dedication program on April 19, 1973.

 

Folder #54

Toledo State Hospital Signs

Five black and white images of the Toledo State Hospital signs through the years to include: Toledo Mental Health Center, James Rhodes, Governor, Toledo Mental Health Center, George Voinovich, Gov.; Northcoast Behavioral Healthcare, (date unknown); Northwest Ohio Psychiatric Hospital,  circa 2009.

 

Folder #55

Hospital Buildings at the Toledo State Hospital Grounds

Black and white images of the Toledo State Hospital Buildings to include; female cottages, male cottages, administration building, morgue, physician’s residence, masonry shop, multiple barns, carpenter building, amusement building, bull barn, heating plant, double residence hall, grain barn, garages, green house, implement storage, industrial building, Kraut plant and white barn.

 

Folder #56

New Receiving Hospital at the Toledo State Hospital

Twenty five black and white images including; the architectural drawings of the new receiving building, April 9, 1970 ground breaking; November 1, 1952 dedication with Judge Norris as speaker; entrance doors, 1961 medical staff, Serenity Hall, hospital sign listing James Rhodes as Governor.

 

Folder #57

Photos of Toledo State Hospital Buildings

A variety of black and white images showing the buildings on the Toledo State Hospital ground to include; women’s hospital, administration building, associate dining hall for men, main entrance in 2004, men’s hospital Sept 1977, alcoholic ward Sept. 1977.

 

Folder #58

Toledo Mental Health Center

Eight black and white images of cottages and buildings that are located on the Toledo State Hospital grounds.

 

Folder #59

Toledo Mental Health Center 1990

Nine black and white images taken in 1990 on the Toledo Mental Health Center grounds, including pictures of the admitting building, chapel, duck ­pond, annex entrance, annex units, health center sign with George Voinovich, Governor and the TMHC human resource sign.

 

Folder #60

Toledo Mental Health Center Unknown Years

Eight black and white images have been identified as the following; Building 1, 4-5-6,

Cottage 5 M-H 1-2-3, Cottage 1, 2, and 3, L Building, M Building and W-3 and L Building, M- H Building 1-2-3.

 

Folder #61

Toledo Mental Health Center 1976

Fifty-eight black and white images reveal the efficiency of the center included in the folder are; administration building, amusement hall, rear view of cottage, K, J, H, F, blacksmith shop, chapel, cottages, 1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9,10,,11,12. cottage A, Catholic chapel, firehouse, greenhouse, ice house, industrial building, kraut cellar, men’s hospital, various views of the triplex original storeroom, patients’ library, plumbing shop, residence building 1940, sunken garden, women’s hospital, water tower/record storage circa Oct. 1976.

 

Folder #62

Toledo State Hospital 1957

Fifty-eight black and white images document the living environment of both male and female in at the Toledo State Hospital circa 1957; images include the following for both genders; cottage bathrooms, kitchens, sink, breadbox and dumbwaiter, dormitory rooms for sleeping, dining rooms, outside clothes storage, entrances under the wards, ,recreation rooms, back porch, auditorium and coved ceiling, window security, New Receiving  area, employees cafeteria, sink in hydrotherapy room, surgical room, patients room for surgery; notation [ 1 bathtub for 61 men.]

 

Folder #63

Toledo State Hospital Architectural Drawing

Five black and white images of the architectural drawing show the plans for grading and seeding the grounds on the Toledo State Hospital with notation for the gas, water, sanitary, storm sewers and existing tunnel locations

 

Folder #64

Various Photos circa 1888-2004

Eighty-five black and white images show various areas of the Toledo State Hospital grounds from 1888 thru 2004; including: four scenes from the pond and bridge, aerial view of the Toledo State Hospital, variety of resident buildings and cottages, early view of the ballfield and water tower, the Neuropsychiatric Unit, physician’s residence circa 2004, patients working the fields circa 1888, bakery, garages, interior of dorms in circa 1950s, nurses’ building, minimum care room, factory inside the hospital grounds, powerhouse, comparison of building structure (old and new), beds on cottage porch circa 1957, library circa 1950s, original insulated with saw dust ice house, alcoholic ward circa 1977  and a  variety of chapel images.  

 

Folder #65

Census 1880 Northwest Ohio Insane

Copies of the original census record from Adams Township, Lucas County, Ohio from June 1, 1879-May 31, 1880 from the Northwest Ohio Insane Asylum.

 

Folder #66

Newspaper Articles

Newspaper articles reporting on the Northwest Ohio Hospital for the Insane [aka Toledo State Hospital] include the following: “Toledo Blade”, July 5, 1888; “Ohio Saturday Evening”, June 30, 1888; “Toledo Daily Blade” Jan. 19, 1888; and “Toledo Blade” June 1, 1949

 

Folder #67

Ohio State Law

A copy of the House Joint Resolution No. 41 in the State of Ohio allowing the admittance of Lizzie Egley to Northwest Ohio Hospital for the Insane in 1882; information is located in Ohio Law LXXIX, 1882;  a copy of the Senate Joint Resolution No. 70 Ohio Law, LXXXII, 1885 authorizing  the attorney-general to contract for the maintenance of the insane in the Lucas county insane asylum not to exceed 90 people with at the cost of $4.25 per week at the Northwest Ohio Hospital for the Insane.  

 

Folder #68

Polk Toledo Directory 1879-1892

A listing for the Northwest Ohio Hospital for the Insane [aka Toledo State Hospital] with address, name of superintendent, physician, matron, mechanic and number of patients from 1879-1892. 

 

Folder #69

Northwest Ohio Insane Asylum 1888

Black and white copy of the map that identified the area where the Northwest Ohio Insane Asylum was located in Adams Twp., Lucas County OH

 

Folder #70

Northwest Ohio Hospital for the Insane

Black and white image of a photograph of the Northwest Ohio Hospital for the insane circa 1888

 

Folder #71

Department of Mental Health Police

Black and white images of a badge for the State Hospital Police and a patch for the Police Mental Health worker.

 

Folder #72

Hospital Pins and Patches

Article from the “Motive Magazine” May/June 1969 that focused on Mrs. Charles Schnapp, a volunteer for the Toledo State Auxiliary, for 47 years at the Toledo State Hospital; magazine published by the Ohio Department of Mental Hygiene and Correction;  a variety of insignia patches for the Toledo State Hospital

 

Folder # 73

Hospital Staff

Nine black and white images for the 1933-34 School of Nursing at the Toledo State Hospital; a group composite and individual images identified;   1954 Toledo State Hospital Reunion group portrait reunion, at Cambridge State Hospital;  black and white images of alumni of Toledo State Hospital School of Nursing circa 1946;  June 27, 1964 article reporting on  the first reunion reception; list of names for the  Nursing School Graduates at Toledo State Hospital, 1934 (9).1935 (9), 1936 (6), 1937 (4), 1938 (11), 1939 (7), 1940 (3), 1941 (9), 1942 (12), 1943 (9), 1944 (12), 1945 (9), 1946 (10), 1947 (11); individual images of nurses graduation from 1941-1944; congratulation telegrams for the reunion participants; Toledo State Hospital Nursing song 1964. 

 

Folder #74

1972 Article Toledo State Library

Copy of the article “Books and Bricks-There is More Than That to a Library” focus on the library at Toledo Mental Health Center containing over 7,000 volumes accessible to patients

 

Folder # 75

Dr. Henry Archibald Tobey, Supt. Toledo State Hospital

Correspondence with Mayor Jones and letters from the patients from the Toledo State Hospital

 

Folder #76

Hardin County Medical Society Meeting

A record of the Hardin County Medical Society meetings, circa 1850 including by-laws, code of ethics, bill of charges, and meeting records

 

Folder #77

Journal of American Chemical Society

The journal contains sketches of the 1891 gas meter registered and patented by Dr. Henry A. Tobey.

 

Folder #78

History of Montgomery County Medical Society

Documentation of the Montgomery County Medical Society organized Sept 13, 1849 including names of members, by-laws, and agenda

 

Folder # 79

Obituary Notice for Dr. H. A. Tobey

A complete obituary for Dr. Henry A. Tobey published in the “American Journal of Insanity”, Massillon, OH, April, 1910; a biographical sketch of Dr. Tobey listed in Union County, Ohio; gravesite and family headstone monument for Dr. Henry Tobey (1852-1908), wife, Minnie Conklin Tobey (1857-1902), wife, Alice Tobey McBride (1884-1931); Historic Woodlawn Cemetery

 

Folder #80

Annual Ohio State Conference

The 5th Annual Ohio State Conference Report for the Insane held Oct. 15-18, 1895 in Columbus, OH

 

Folder #81

Dr. H. A. Tobey’s Supt., Communication

A 1886 copy of Dr. H. A. Tobey acceptance letter for the position of Superintendent of the Asylum; a black and white image of a photo of Dr. H. A. Tobey; a July 1892 listing of appointments and resignations for positions in asylums throughout the United States including Dr. Henry Tobey, Supt. of Asylum, Toledo, OH;   an article from “New York Times” July 3, 1907   listing Dr. Tobey as a patient at the Toledo State Hospital

 

Folder #82

Toledo State Hospital Employee Job and Wages

A listing of job titles from 1911-1949 for the Toledo State Hospital; a copy of the wages and pay-role record for October 15, 1911 employees at the Toledo State Hospital

 

Folder #83

Mental Health Center Cookbook

A copy of the Centennial Cookbook for the Mental Health Center that contains fifty-six pages of recipes

 

Folder #84

Fountain Dedication

Variety of black and white images that highlight the dedication of the fountain in honor of Dr. Joseph Duty who served Toledo State Hospital from 1946-1968.  

 

Folder # 85

Dr. George Love, Superintendent of Toledo State Hospital

A report of “History of Institutional Care of the Insane” authored by George Love, M.D., Supt. of Toledo State Hospital

 

Folder #86

Medical Doctors and Directors at Toledo State Hospital

Listing of and black and white images of the medical doctors, directors and superintendents at the Toledo State Hospital from 1888-1989

 

Folder #87

Nurses at Toledo State Hospital

Individual black and white class composite images  of  classes 1931 thru 1946, School of Nursing; thirteen black and white images of the Directors of Nursing at the Toledo State Hospital from 1931-1988; thirty-two black and white images of nurses at the Toledo State Hospital

 

Folder #88

Directors in the School of Nursing at Toledo State Hospital

Eleven individual black and white images of the women serving as Director in the School of Nursing; a composite of the women and a list of names and years served in that position

 

Folder #89

Orientation Manual for the Toledo State Hospital Receiving and Recovery

A forty-four page document that identifies an organizational chart, guidelines for employees, listing of departments with sub-title departments, and job descriptions

 

Folder #90

School of Nursing

Black and white composites from class of 1931-1947; memorabilia from the nurses’ residents to include cups, punch bowl and cups, vases, nurse’s cap, School of Nursing Accreditation Certificate for nurses, Honor Roll list of nurses serving their country; group picture from the class of 1941; black and white photo of Cottage A; copy of the School of Nursing Affiliate of Psychiatric Nursing diploma

 

Folder # 91

Toledo State Hospital Baseball

Two 1897 articles and transcriptions from Toledo Blade with an account of the baseball games; black and white images of the baseball team circa 1890; black and white female in uniform, circa 1890; view of the recreation grounds that include a view of the baseball diamond

 

Folder # 92

Toledo State Hospital Employees

A list of Toledo State Hospital employees in 1889; obituary for Geraldine Shoop, Director of Nursing; a reflective interview with Angie Danford, R.N 1954-1987; black and white image of nurses group, date unknown

 

Folder #93

Patients at the Toledo State Hospital

A listing of the Allen County resident admissions 1889-1892; listing of amusement for Nov. 15, 1894; weekly menus from 1889-1894; a list of clothing articles issued to patients in 1888; record of Richland County resident admissions  to the Toledo Asylum ca. 1891; monthly statement for patient care from Crawford County

 

Folder #94

Poems by Jennie L. Dickerson

Thirty pages of poems by Jennie L. Dickerson

 

Folder #95

Postcards from Toledo State Hospital

Eighty- two black and white images of various buildings and grounds, ca. 1907-1952

 

Folder # 96

Toledo State Hospital Auxiliary

Newspaper articles circa 1950-1980 reporting on the establishment of the Toledo State Hospital Auxiliary, officers, events, activities, barber shop project, patients request to improve facility

 

Folder # 97

Research from Toledo State Hospital

Published research by Gordon McDonald, “Effect of Test Retest Intervals and Item Arrangement of the Shortened Forms of the MMPI” and published research by James Bond, “In Investigation of Social in Schizophrenia Interaction”, ca. 1950

 

Folder #98

Original photographs of Toledo State Hospital

Toledo State Hospital building (interior and exterior, undated); original image of staff (undated); black and white prints of Toledo State Hospital nurses home, circa 1941; watercolor photograph of administration building, circa 1940

 

Album

Collection of twenty-nine black and white 8 ½ x 10 photographs; three colored prints; twenty- nine 3 ½  x 5 prints of Toledo State Hospital buildings, circa 1974

Album 1890 Veterans U.S. Census of the Sailors and Soldiers Home

Photographs of Toledo State Hospital Buildings

Toledo State Hospital Cemetery Reclamation Project, 2010

Postcards showing varying scenes of Toledo State Hospital Grounds